Indo Iranian Journal

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Indo Iranian Journal


Transitive Nouns and Adjectives

This book explores the wealth of evidence from early Indo-Aryan for the existence of transitive nouns and adjectives, a rare linguistic phenomenon which, according to some categorizations of word classes, should not occur.

Transitive Nouns and Adjectives

This book explores the wealth of evidence from early Indo-Aryan for the existence of transitive nouns and adjectives, a rare linguistic phenomenon which, according to some categorizations of word classes, should not occur. John Lowe shows that most transitive nouns and adjectives attested in early Indo-Aryan cannot be analysed as a type of non-finite verb category, but must be acknowledged as a distinct constructional type. The volume provides a detailed introduction to transitivity (verbal and adpositional), the categories of agent and action noun, and to early Indo-Aryan. Four periods of early Indo-Aryan are selected for study: Rigvedic Sanskrit, the earliest Indo-Aryan; Vedic Prose, a slightly later form of Sanskrit; Epic Sanskrit, a form of Sanskrit close to the standardized 'Classical' Sanskrit; and Pali, the early Middle Indo-Aryan language of the Buddhist scriptures. John Lowe shows that while each linguistic stage is different, there are shared features of transitive nouns and adjectives which apply throughout the history of early Indo-Aryan. The data is set in the wider historical context, from Proto-Indo-European to Modern Indo-Aryan, and a formal linguistic analysis of transitive nouns and adjectives is provided in the framework of Lexical-Functional Grammar.

Eschatology in the Indo Iranian Traditions

Indologica Taurinensia 23-24 : 583-605 . 1999a . " Yonder World in the Atharvaveda . ” Indo - Iranian Journal 42.2 : 107-20 . 1999b . " Pits , Pitfalls , and the Underworld in the Veda . ” Indo - Iranian Journal 42.3 : 211-26 . 2000a .

Eschatology in the Indo Iranian Traditions

Eschatology in the Indo-Iranian Traditions traces the roots of the belief in life after death from the earliest religious beliefs of the Indo-European people, through its first textual emergence among the Indo-Iranians. Tracing the Indo-Iranian concepts of the nature and constitution of man, with special reference to the doctrine of the Soul and its transmigration, the book demonstrates the profound nature of the physical, ethical, spiritual, and psychological ideals embodied in these thought systems as preserved in the Indian and Iranian scriptures. The central issue was death and the journey to the afterlife. Exploring the characteristic features of Indo-Iranian religions provides a better understanding of the development of eschatological beliefs in later religions in the same way that the Zoroastrian apocalyptic beliefs point to genetic historical relations among Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, and Islam. This comparative study enriches our understanding of the antecedents of afterlife beliefs and creates enthusiasm for further in-depth research into the Indo-Iranian religion as a system, acknowledging its genetic historical connections with both earlier and subsequent traditions. Eschatology in the Indo-Iranian Traditions has wide-ranging appeal to upper undergraduate and graduate courses in comparative religion, Asian studies, philosophy, and Indian and Iranian studies.

Proceedings of the All India Oriental Conference

The basis of this work , published in the series Orientalia RhenoTraiectina ( ed . by J. Gonda ) is the author's doctoral ... James W. Boyd & Firoze M. Kotwal , Worship in a Zoroastrian Fire temple Indo - Iranian Journal Volume 28 No.

Proceedings of the All India Oriental Conference


Iran

Journal of the British Institute of Persian Studies ABBREVIATIONS ... New Series IA Iranica Antiqua "J Indo-Iranian Journal IJMES International Journal of Middle East Studies ILN Illustrated London News Isl Der Islam JA Journal ...

Iran

Vols. for 1963- include the Director's report, 1961/62-

Buddhist Logic

Buddhist Logic


Asiatische Studien

Indo - Iranian Journal 48 ( 1-2 ) , Spring 2005 ( come out 2006 ) . ( a.o. Walter Slaje : “ Kaschmir im Mittelalter und die Quellen der Geschichtswissenschaft " ; Peter M. Scharf : “ Pāṇinian accounts of the Vedic subjunctive : let ...

Asiatische Studien


The Da va Cult in the G th s

Kotwal, FM and Boyd, JW 1992, A Persian Offering: The Yasna; a Zoroastrian High Liturgy, Association pour l'avancement des études iraniennes, Paris. Kuiper, FBJ 1957, 'Avestan Mazdā', Indo-Iranian Journal, vol. 1, pp. 86–95.

The Da  va Cult in the G  th  s

Addressing the question of the origins of the Zoroastrian religion, this book argues that the intransigent opposition to the cult of the daēvas, the ancient Indo-Iranian gods, is the root of the development of the two central doctrines of Zoroastrianism: cosmic dualism and eschatology (fate of the soul after death and its passage to the other world). The daēva cult as it appears in the Gāthās, the oldest part of the Zoroastrian sacred text, the Avesta, had eschatological pretentions. The poet of the Gāthās condemns these as deception. The book critically examines various theories put forward since the 19th century to account for the condemnation of the daēvas. It then turns to the relevant Gāthic passages and analyzes them in detail in order to give a picture of the cult and the reasons for its repudiation. Finally, it examines materials from other sources, especially the Greek accounts of Iranian ritual lore (mainly) in the context of the mystery cults. Classical Greek writers consistently associate the nocturnal ceremony of the magi with the mysteries as belonging to the same religious-cultural category. This shows that Iranian religious lore included a nocturnal rite that aimed at ensuring the soul’s journey to the beyond and a desirable afterlife. Challenging the prevalent scholarship of the Greek interpretation of Iranian religious lore and proposing a new analysis of the formation of the Hellenistic concept of ‘magic,’ this book is an important resource for students and scholars of History, Religion and Iranian Studies.

Indian Journal of History of Science

Journal of the American Oriental Society 80 , 330 - 335 . ... Journal of Near Eastern Studies 29 , 103 - 123 . ... in Sanskrit Texts of Architecture ( Orientation Methods in the İsānaśivagurudevapaddhati ) Indo - Iranian Journal 29 .

Indian Journal of History of Science


The Indo Aryan Languages

(1976) 'The genitive form as the basis of some pronominal bases in Prakrit”, Journal of the Oriental Institute, Baroda 25: 343–8. ... Kuiper, F. B. J. (1957) 'The PaisàcI fragment of the Kuvalayamālā', Indo-Iranian Journal 1: 229–40.

The Indo Aryan Languages

The Indo-Aryan languages are spoken by at least 700 million people throughout India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka and the Maldive Islands. They have a claim to great antiquity, with the earliest Vedic Sanskrit texts dating to the end of the second millennium B.C. With texts in Old Indo-Aryan, Middle Indo-Aryan and Modern Indo-Aryan, this language family supplies a historical documentation of language change over a longer period than any other subgroup of Indo-European. This volume is divided into two main sections dealing with general matters and individual languages. Each chapter on the individual language covers the phonology and grammar (morphology and syntax) of the language and its writing system, and gives the historical background and information concerning the geography of the language and the number of its speakers.

Journal of the International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies

... AS/ES Asiatische Studien/Etudes Asiatiques (Bern) IetT Indica et Tibetica (Swisttal-Odendorf) IU Indo-Iranian Journal (Dordrecht) IT Indologica Taurinensia (Torino) JAOS Journal of the American Oriental Society (New Haven, Conn.) ...

Journal of the International College for Postgraduate Buddhist Studies


Brill Middle East and Islamic Studies Journals Online

Provides full-text access to the following journals published by Brill: Abgadyat Al-Bayan: Journal of Quran and Hadith Studies Arab Law Quarterly Arabica Die Welt des Islams Hawwa Indo-Iranian Journal Inner Asia Intellectual History of the ...

Brill Middle East and Islamic Studies Journals Online

Provides full-text access to the following journals published by Brill: Abgadyat Al-Bayan: Journal of Quran and Hadith Studies Arab Law Quarterly Arabica Die Welt des Islams Hawwa Indo-Iranian Journal Inner Asia Intellectual History of the Islamicate World Iran and the Caucasus Islamic Africa Islamic Law and Society Journal of Abbasid Studies Journal of Arabic Literature Journal of Islamic Manuscripts Journal of Persianate Studies Journal of Sufi Studies Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication Middle East Law and Governance Muqarnas Online Oriens Sociology of Islam Studia Islamica Turkish Historical Review.

Transitive Nouns and Adjectives

This text explores the wealth of evidence from early Indo-Aryan for the existence of transitive nouns and adjectives, a rare linguistic phenomenon.

Transitive Nouns and Adjectives

This text explores the wealth of evidence from early Indo-Aryan for the existence of transitive nouns and adjectives, a rare linguistic phenomenon. The data is set in the wider historical context, from Proto-Indo-European to Modern Indo-Aryan, and analysed from diachronic, typological, and theoretical perspectives.

The Avestan Vowels

1959 : Avestan ainita- ' unharmed ' , Indo - Iranian Journal 3 , 137-140 ( = 1997 : 336-339 ) . 1960 : The ancient Aryan verbal contest , Indo - Iranian Journal 4 , 217-281 . 1967 : The Sanskrit Nom . Sing . vít , Indo - Iranian Journal ...

The Avestan Vowels

For the first time, the vowels of Avestan are studied comprehensively on the synchronic and diachronic level. All vowel changes which have occurred after the Proto-Iranian stage are discussed, and they are placed in a relative chronology. The phonological system of Avestan at various stages of its development is reconstructed, and the relationship between Old Avestan and Young Avestan is reviewed. Also, many philological details are discussed. This volume is of interest for Indo-Iranian philology, for Indo-European linguistics and for Iranian linguistics.