The Cambridge Introduction to Satire

Provides a comprehensive overview for both beginning and advanced students of satiric forms from ancient poetry to contemporary digital media.

The Cambridge Introduction to Satire

Provides a comprehensive overview for both beginning and advanced students of satiric forms from ancient poetry to contemporary digital media.

Satire

This book is designed with several audiences in mind—the student relatively new to literary satire, the more experienced generalist, and the specialist. The student who needs an introduction to satire as a genre will find here a series ...

Satire

Here is the ideal introduction to satire for the student and, for the experienced scholar, an occasion to reconsider the uses, problems, and pleasures of satire in light of contemporary theory. Satire is a staple of the literary classroom. Dustin Griffin moves away from the prevailing moral-didactic approach established thirty some years ago to a more open view and reintegrates the Menippean tradition with the tradition of formal verse satire. Exploring texts from Aristophanes to the moderns, with special emphasis on the eighteenth century, Griffin uses a dozen figures -- Horace, Juvenal, Persius, Lucian, More, Rabelais, Donne, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Blake, and Byron -- as primary examples. Because satire often operates as a mode or procedure rather than as a genre, Griffin offers not a comprehensive theory but a set of critical perspectives. Some of his topics are traditional in satire criticism: the role of satire as moralist, the nature of satiric rhetoric, the impact of satire on the political order. Others are new: the problems of satire and closure, the pleasure it affords readers and writers, and the socioeconomic status of the satirist. Griffin concludes that satire is problematic, open-ended, essayistic, and ambiguous in its relationship to history, uncertain in its political effect, resistant to formal closure, more inclined to ask questions than provide answers, and ambivalent about the pleasures it offers.

Satire

Here is the ideal introduction to satire for the student and, for the experienced scholar, an occasion to reconsider the uses, problems, and pleasures of satire in light of contemporary theory. Satire is a staple of the literary classroom.

Satire

Here is the ideal introduction to satire for the student and, for the experienced scholar, an occasion to reconsider the uses, problems, and pleasures of satire in light of contemporary theory. Satire is a staple of the literary classroom. Dustin Griffin moves away from the prevailing moral-didactic approach established thirty some years ago to a more open view and reintegrates the Menippean tradition with the tradition of formal verse satire. Exploring texts from Aristophanes to the moderns, with special emphasis on the eighteenth century, Griffin uses a dozen figures -- Horace, Juvenal, Persius, Lucian, More, Rabelais, Donne, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Blake, and Byron -- as primary examples. Because satire often operates as a mode or procedure rather than as a genre, Griffin offers not a comprehensive theory but a set of critical perspectives. Some of his topics are traditional in satire criticism: the role of satire as moralist, the nature of satiric rhetoric, the impact of satire on the political order. Others are new: the problems of satire and closure, the pleasure it affords readers and writers, and the socioeconomic status of the satirist. Griffin concludes that satire is problematic, open-ended, essayistic, and ambiguous in its relationship to history, uncertain in its political effect, resistant to formal closure, more inclined to ask questions than provide answers, and ambivalent about the pleasures it offers.

Irony

Irony


Roman Satire

Facilitates comparative and intertextual discussion of different satirists. This text is a compact and critically up-to-date introduction to Roman satire.

Roman Satire

This compact and critically up-to-date introduction to Roman satire examines the development of the genre, focusing particularly on the literary and social functionality of satire. It considers why it was important to the Romans and why it still matters. Provides a compact and critically up-to-date introduction to Roman satire. Focuses on the development and function of satire in literary and social contexts. Takes account of recent critical approaches. Keeps the uninitiated reader in mind, presuming no prior knowledge of the subject. Introduces each satirist in his own historical time and place – including the masters of Roman satire, Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal. Facilitates comparative and intertextual discussion of different satirists.

Roman Verse Satire

This edition provides introduction to Roman verse satire for the English reader and aid to the Latin student in understanding these challenging, sometimes obscure texts.

Roman Verse Satire

-- Introduction -- Latin text with facing English translation -- Notes keyed to English translations -- Index of names Satura quidem tota nostra est (Satire is altogether ours) was the claim of the Roman Quintilian, the first century C.E. commentator on rhetorical and literary matters, for the literary world had not previously seen the likes of satire. This edition provides introduction to Roman verse satire for the English reader and aid to the Latin student in understanding these challenging, sometimes obscure texts. Lucilius, Horace, Persius, and Juvenal are equally represented, in an attempt to redress a tendency in other anthologies to favor Horace and Juvenal.

Satire and Dissent

1. introduction 1. Dentith, Parody, 185. 2. Newman, “Irony Is Dead,” 1. 3. Warner, “The Mass Public and the Mass Subject,” 396. 4. Young, Justice and thePolitics of Difference, 109. 5. Griffen, Satire, 137. 6. Bloom and Bloom, Satire's ...

Satire and Dissent

In an age when Jon Stewart frequently tops lists of most-trusted newscasters, the films of Michael Moore become a dominant topic of political campaign analysis, and activists adopt ironic, fake personas to attract attention -- the satiric register has attained renewed and urgent prominence in political discourse. Amber Day focuses on the parodist news show, the satiric documentary, and ironic activism to examine the techniques of performance across media, highlighting their shared objective of bypassing standard media outlets and the highly choreographed nature of current political debate.

Satire

If you and your students are looking for a way to connect literature, politics, and history,this is a great place to start.

Satire

What literary form has remained contemporary for over two thousand years? Satire, of course! Every age has its mockers, whether they be political cartoonists, angry poets, or bemused novelists lamenting the literary trends of the day. Prestwick House's brand-new introduction to satire encompasses its whole history, from beginnings to modern times; it covers poems, newspaper editorials, and fiction as well as satire in other media. If you and your students are looking for a way to connect literature, politics, and history,this is a great place to start.

Satire as the Comic Public Sphere

Jonathan Greenberg, The Cambridge Introduction to Satire (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019), 11. 24. Greenberg, Cambridge Introduction to Satire; John T. Gilmore, Satire, New Critical Idiom Series (London: Routledge, 2018).

Satire as the Comic Public Sphere

Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, John Oliver, and Jimmy Kimmel—these comedians are household names whose satirical takes on politics, the news, and current events receive some of the highest ratings on television. In this book, James E. Caron examines these and other satirists through the lenses of humor studies, cultural theory, and rhetorical and social philosophy, arriving at a new definition of the comic art form. Tracing the history of modern satire from its roots in the Enlightenment values of rational debate, evidence, facts, accountability, and transparency, Caron identifies a new genre: “truthiness satire.” He shows how satirists such as Colbert, Bee, Oliver, and Kimmel—along with writers like Charles Pierce and Jack Shafer—rely on shared values and on the postmodern aesthetics of irony and affect to foster engagement within the comic public sphere that satire creates. Using case studies of bits, parodies, and routines, Caron reveals a remarkable process: when evidence-based news reporting collides with a discursive space asserting alternative facts, the satiric laughter that erupts can move the audience toward reflection and possibly even action as the body politic in the public sphere. With rigor, humor, and insight, Caron shows that truthiness satire pushes back against fake news and biased reporting and that the satirist today is at heart a citizen, albeit a seemingly silly one. This book will appeal to anyone interested in and concerned about public discourse in the current era, especially researchers in media studies, communication studies, political science, and literary and cultural studies.

Horace Satire 1 9

-- The complete Latin text based on the Oxford Wickham-Garrod edition -- An introduction -- Notes on same and facing pages -- Complete vocabulary in back

Horace Satire 1 9

-- The complete Latin text based on the Oxford Wickham-Garrod edition -- An introduction -- Notes on same and facing pages -- Complete vocabulary in back

The Sacred Weapon

The Sacred Weapon


Thirteen Satires of Juvenal Vol 1

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Thirteen Satires of Juvenal  Vol  1

Excerpt from Thirteen Satires of Juvenal, Vol. 1: Introduction, Text, Etc Tm: object of the editors has been to produce an edition of Juvenal which may prove of use in aiding the students at our Schools and Universities to appreciate and understand the great Roman Satirist. They have been very anxious to try and follow the train of thought in each Satire, and to cite parallel passages from classical authors where it has appeared that real light was thrown by such quotations upon the passage before the reader. They have not always quoted at length, for fear of rendering the volume too bulky. They have found, of existing editions, Weidner's among the most useful, and have frequently borrowed from his scholarly Commentary, now, unfortunately, out of print. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Two Satires

INTRODUCTION TO SATIRE I I agree with Heinrich , who holds that this satire was intended as an introduction to Juvenal's collected satires . Although it should be remembered that the very nature of the Roman Satura was that it should be ...

Two Satires