Invisible Women

Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men

Invisible Women

*THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER* ‘HELL YES. This is one of those books that has the potential to change things – a monumental piece of research’ Caitlin Moran Imagine a world where... · Your phone is too big for your hand · Your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body · In a car accident you are 47% more likely to be injured. If any of that sounds familiar, chances are you’re a woman. From government policy and medical research, to technology, workplaces, and the media. Invisible Women reveals how in a world built for and by men we are systematically ignoring half of the population, often with disastrous consequences. Caroline Criado Perez brings together for the first time an impressive range of case studies, stories and new research from across the world that illustrate the hidden ways in which women are forgotten, and the profound impact this has on us all. Discover the shocking gender bias that affects our everyday lives. ‘A book that changes the way you see the world’ Sunday Times ‘Revelatory, frightening, hopeful’ Jeanette Winterson **Winner of the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize 2019** **Winner of the Readers' Choice Books Are My Bag Award 2019** **Winner of the FT & McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2019 Book of the Year Award 2019** **The Times Current Affairs Book of the Year 2019**

Invisible Women

What's Wrong With Women's Prisons?

Invisible Women

In a book that is accessible to general readers and professionals alike, Angela Devlin has vividly recreated the realities of prison life for women at the end of the twentieth century. She describes the cavalier way in which women can be treated; the lack of provision for many basic needs; the over crowding; the liberal use of medication as a means of control; the violence which stems from drug misuse; the plight of black and ethnic minority women and foreign nationals; and the self-mutilation and suicide attempts of women in desperate need of help. Invisible Women 'lifts the lid' on women's prisons. It is a book that will shock as well as inform.

INVISIBLE WOMEN

INVISIBLE WOMEN

This book is based on a phenomenological study on undocumented Mexican immigrant mothers of high school students who have lived in the U.S. for at least five years and received social services. Most of these mothers have emigrated from rural areas of the central and southern Mexican States of Guanajuato, Michoacan, Queretaro, among others. According to the participants, socio-economic conditions forced them to leave their homelands hoping to find a better life in the U.S.

In the Land of Invisible Women

A Female Doctor's Journey in the Saudi Kingdom

In the Land of Invisible Women

"In this stunningly written book, a Western trained Muslim doctor brings alive what it means for a woman to live in the Saudi Kingdom. I've rarely experienced so vividly the shunning and shaming, racism and anti-Semitism, but the surprise is how Dr. Ahmed also finds tenderness at the tattered edges of extremism, and a life-changing pilgrimage back to her Muslim faith." - Gail Sheehy The decisions that change your life are often the most impulsive ones. Unexpectedly denied a visa to remain in the United States, Qanta Ahmed, a young British Muslim doctor, becomes an outcast in motion. On a whim, she accepts an exciting position in Saudi Arabia. This is not just a new job; this is a chance at adventure in an exotic land she thinks she understands, a place she hopes she will belong. What she discovers is vastly different. The Kingdom is a world apart, a land of unparralled contrast. She finds rejection and scorn in the places she believed would most embrace her, but also humor, honesty, loyalty and love. And for Qanta, more than anything, it is a land of opportunity. A place where she discovers what it takes for one woman to recreate herself in the land of invisible women.

Calling Invisible Women

A Novel

Calling Invisible Women

A delightfully funny novel packing a clever punch, from the author of the New York Times bestselling Julie and Romeo A mom in her early fifties, Clover knows she no longer turns heads the way she used to, and she's only really missed when dinner isn't on the table on time. Then Clover wakes up one morning to discover she's invisible--truly invisible. She panics even more when her family doesn't notice a thing. Her best friend immediately observes the change, which relieves Clover immensely--she's not losing her mind after all!--but she is crushed by the realization that neither her husband nor her children ever truly look at her. She was invisible even before she knew it. Clover discovers that there are others like her, women of a certain age who seem to have disappeared. As she uses her invisibility to get to know her family and her town better, Clover leads the way in helping invisible women become recognized and appreciated no matter what their role. Smart and hilarious, with indomitable female characters, Calling Invisible Women will appeal to anyone who has ever felt invisible.

Critical to Care

The Invisible Women in Health Services

Critical to Care

Who counts as a health care worker? The question of where we draw the line between health care workers and non-health care workers is not merely a matter of academic nicety or a debate without consequences for care. It is a central issue for policy development because the definition often results in a division among workers in ways that undermine care. Critical to Care uses a wide range of evidence to reveal the contributions that those who provide personal care, who cook, clean, keep records, and do laundry make to health services. As a result of current reforms, these workers are increasingly treated as peripheral even though the research on what determines health demonstrates that their work is essential. The authors stress the invisibility and undervaluing of 'women's work' as well as the importance of context in understanding how this work is defined and treated. Through a gendered analysis, Critical to Care establishes a basis for discussing research, policy, and other actions in relation to the work of thousands of marginalized women and men every day.

Invisible Women

Junior Enlisted Army Wives

Invisible Women

Military manpower policy is often crafted by policymakers without an in-depth understanding of the life experiences and views of junior enlisted personnel. It is plausible to expect that some policymakers attribute the attitudes and experiences of these young soldiers to such features as youth or lack of an advanced education and may thus believethemselves able to empathize with this population group by recalling their own parallel life experiences. However, this approach oversimplifies the life experiences of these families and neglects the reality that most policymakers and professional managers have never experienced the compendium of problems these couples face, such as youth, lack ofeducation, financial difficulties, emotional and physical distance from extended family, and invisibility in a large bureaucracy. At the center of this book are the personal stories of three junior enlisted spouses, told in their own voices and selected to emphasize the dilemmas numerous enlisted families face. The stories provide insight into the experiencesand attitudes of other junior enlisted families. Those interested or involved in the military, or those who live a military lifestyle--at any pay grade--will find these stories both useful and engaging.

Of Lovely Tyrants and Invisible Women

The Female Invalid as Metaphor in the Fiction of Ellen Glasgow

Of Lovely Tyrants and Invisible Women

This book examines images of female illness and invalidism as a metaphor of women's position of invisibility in Victorian and fin-de-siecle America, which pervade the fiction of the Virginia writer Ellen Glasgow (Richmond, 1873-1945). The study contends that the author explores the Victorian cult of invalidism to reveal the mechanisms of patriarchy: her novels warn against adhering to its values, since women are moulded to become epitomes of extreme delicacy and selflessness, being ultimately reduced to virtual inexistence. Many times physically incapacitating, Glasgow seems to suggest, the doctrine of female self-effacement always debilitates women's autonomy as human beings. The female invalids in Glasgow's fiction thus operate as uncanny mirrors of the self women become if they adhere to the traditional code of femininity and its adjoining principle of self-sacrifice.

Invisible Women

True Stories of Courage and Survival

Invisible Women

In 'Fatwa' Jacky Trevane told her nightmare story of domestic abuse. Now in 'Invisible Women' she tells the true stories of some of these women who have lost their identities and are forced to make the tough choice of remaining invisible to survive, or fight to be who they really are.