Isaiah 1 33 Volume 24

toward Salvation: A Rhetorical Analysis of Isaiah 56–59. American University Studies 7.13. New York: Lang, 1986. ———. “Zum Text des Tritojesaia.” ZAW 33 (1913) 89– 91. Rofé, A. “Nevertheless 'Trito-Isaiah.' ” 'al hePereq 2 (1986) 7–15 ...

Isaiah 1 33  Volume 24

The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Overview of Commentary Organization Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Each section of the commentary includes: Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English. Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation. Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here. Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research. Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues. General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliographycontains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.

Isaiah 1 39

Ward, J. M. Amos and Isaiah: Prophets of the Word of God. Nashville: Abingdon, 1969. Watts, J. D. W. Isaiah 133. Volume 24. Word Biblical Commentary. Waco, Texas: Word Books, 1985. Young, E. J. The Book of Isaiah. Volume 1 and 2.

Isaiah 1 39

General editor Lloyd J. Ogilvie brings together a team of skilled and exceptional communicators to blend sound scholarship with life-related illustrations. The design for the Preacher's Commentary gives the reader an overall outline of each book of the Bible. Following the introduction, which reveals the author's approach and salient background on the book, each chapter of the commentary provides the Scripture to be exposited. The New King James Bible has been chosen for the Preacher's Commentary because it combines with integrity the beauty of language, underlying Hebrew and Greek textual basis, and thought-flow of the 1611 King James Version, while replacing obsolete verb forms and other archaisms with their everyday contemporary counterparts for greater readability. Reverence for God is preserved in the capitalization of all pronouns referring to the Father, Son, or Holy Spirit. Readers who are more comfortable with another translation can readily find the parallel passage by means of the chapter and verse reference at the end of each passage being exposited. The paragraphs of exposition combine fresh insights to the Scripture, application, rich illustrative material, and innovative ways of utilizing the vibrant truth for his or her own life and for the challenge of communicating it with vigor and vitality.

The Preacher s Commentary Complete 35 Volume Set Genesis Revelation

Kissane, E.J. The Book of Isaiah. Volume 1. Rev. ed. Dublin: Browne & Nolan, Ltd., 1960. Koch, K. The Prophets. Volume 1. ... Watts, J. D. W. Isaiah 133. Volume 24. Word Biblical Commentary. Waco, Texas: Word Books, 1985.

The Preacher s Commentary  Complete 35 Volume Set  Genesis     Revelation

Written BY Preachers and Teachers FOR Preachers and Teachers The Preacher's Commentary, Complete 35-Volume Set: Genesis–Revelation offers pastors, teachers, and Bible study leaders clear and compelling insights into the entire Bible that will equip them to understand, apply, and teach the truth in God's Word. Each volume is written by one of today's top scholars, and includes: Innovative ideas for preaching and teaching God's Word Vibrant paragraph-by-paragraph exposition Impelling real-life illustrations Insightful and relevant contemporary application An introduction, which reveals the author's approach A full outline of the biblical book being covered Scripture passages (using the New King James Version) and explanations Covering the entire Bible and combining fresh insights with readable exposition and relatable examples, The Preacher's Commentary will help you minister to others and see their lives transformed through the power of God's Word. Whether preacher, teacher, or Bible study leader--if you're a communicator, The Preacher's Commentary will help you share God's Word more effectively with others. Volumes and authors include: Genesis by D. Stuart Briscoe Exodus by Maxie D. Dunnam Leviticus by Gary W. Demarest Numbers by James Philip Deuteronomy by John C. Maxwell Joshua by John A. Huffman, Jr. Judges & Ruth by David Jackman 1 & 2 Samuel by Kenneth L. Chafin 1 & 2 Kings by Russell H. Dilday 1 & 2 Chronicles by Leslie C. Allen Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther by Mark D. Roberts Job by David L. McKenna Psalms 1-72 by Donald M. Williams Psalms 73-150 by Donald M. Williams Proverbs by David A. Hubbard Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon by David A. Hubbard Isaiah 1-39 by David L. McKenna Isaiah 40-66 by David L. McKenna Jeremiah & Lamentations by John Guest Ezekiel by Douglas Stuart Daniel by Sinclair B. Ferguson Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, and Jonah by Lloyd J. Ogilvie Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi by Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. Matthew by Myron S. Augsburger Mark by David L. McKenna Luke by Bruce Larson John by Roger L. Fredrikson Acts by Lloyd J. Ogilvie Romans by D. Stuart Briscoe 1 & 2 Corinthians by Kenneth L. Chafin Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon by Maxie D. Dunnam 1 & 2 Thessalonians, 1 & 2 Timothy, Titus by Gary W. Demarest Hebrews by Louis H. Evans, Jr. James, 1 & 2 Peter, and Jude by Paul A. Cedar 1, 2 & 3 John, and Revelation by Earl F. Palmer

Isaiah 40 66

Ward, J. M. Amos and Isaiah: Prophets of the Word of God. Nashville: Abingdon, 1969. Watts, J. D. W. Isaiah 133. Volume 24. Word Biblical Commentary. Waco, Texas: Word Books, 1985. Young, E.J. The Book of Isaiah. Volume 1 and 2.

Isaiah 40 66

General editor Lloyd J. Ogilvie brings together a team of skilled and exceptional communicators to blend sound scholarship with life-related illustrations. The design for the Preacher's Commentary gives the reader an overall outline of each book of the Bible. Following the introduction, which reveals the author's approach and salient background on the book, each chapter of the commentary provides the Scripture to be exposited. The New King James Bible has been chosen for the Preacher's Commentary because it combines with integrity the beauty of language, underlying Hebrew and Greek textual basis, and thought-flow of the 1611 King James Version, while replacing obsolete verb forms and other archaisms with their everyday contemporary counterparts for greater readability. Reverence for God is preserved in the capitalization of all pronouns referring to the Father, Son, or Holy Spirit. Readers who are more comfortable with another translation can readily find the parallel passage by means of the chapter and verse reference at the end of each passage being exposited. The paragraphs of exposition combine fresh insights to the Scripture, application, rich illustrative material, and innovative ways of utilizing the vibrant truth for his or her own life and for the challenge of communicating it with vigor and vitality.

Old Testament Survey

1 Note S. R. Driver, An Introduction to the Literature of the Old Testament (1891; reprint, Gloucester, Mass. ... (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1986);andJohn D. W.Watts, Isaiah 133,vol.24 inWordBiblical Commentary (Waco, TX: Word, 1985).

Old Testament Survey

This second edition of the widely used and highly praised Old Testament Survey revises the original edition and greatly expands its attention to historical and geographical topics. These are combined with the first edition’s focus on literature and narrative, and an increased amount of improved maps are also included. In all, the book charts every major element that unifies the Old Testament, making it an excellent companion for Bible reading. Any student desiring a thorough and time-tested overview of the Bible’s first half will find it in this updated edition of Old Testament Survey.

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church Volume 1

to Amos 5:24 , “ But let justice roll down like waters , and righteousness like an everflowing stream . ' " " To preach prophetically is far more ... John D. W. Watts , Isaiah 1-33 , Word Biblical Commentary , vol . 24 ( Waco , Tex .

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church  Volume 1

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church is a multivolume study by Hughes Oliphant Old that canvasses the history of preaching from the words of Moses at Mount Sinai through modern times. In Volume 1, The Biblical Period, Old begins his survey by discussing the roots of the Christian ministry of the Word in the worship of Israel. He then examines the preaching of Christ and the Apostles. Finally, Old looks at the development and practice of Christian preaching in the second and third centuries, concluding with the ministry of Origen.

Isaiah s New Exodus and Mark

Vriezen , T. C. , ' Essentials of the Theology of Isaiah ' in Israel's Prophetic Heritage eds . ... 1 , ed . P. Achtemeier ( Missoula : Scholars , 1978 ) 109-19 . Isaiah 1-33 , Isaiah 34-66 WBC vol . 24 , 25 ( Waco , Texas : Word ...

Isaiah s New Exodus and Mark

A revision of the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Cambridge, 1990.

Isaiah

The Book of Isaiah is one of the greatest in the Bible in two respects. ... the companion volumes in the Word Biblical Commentary are abbreviated as WBC, with volume 24 referring to Isaiah 133 and volume 25 referring to Isaiah 34–66.

Isaiah

A companion series to the acclaimed Word Biblical Commentary.Finding the great themes of the books of the Bible is essential to the study of God’s Word and to the preaching and teaching of its truths. These themes and ideas are often like precious gems: they lie beneath the surface and can only be discovered with some difficulty. While commentaries are useful for helping readers understand the content of a verse or chapter, they are not usually designed to help the reader to trace important subjects systematically within a given book a Scripture. The Word Biblical Themes series helps readers discover the important themes of a book of the Bible. This series distills the theological essence of a given book of Scripture and serves it up in ways that enrich the preaching, teaching, worship, and discipleship of God’s people.Volumes in this series:• Written by top biblical scholars• Feature authors who wrote on the same book of the Bible for the Word Biblical Commentary series• Distill deep and focused study on a biblical book into the most important themes and practical applications of them• Give reader’s an ability to see the “big picture” of a book of the Bible by understanding what topics and concerns were most important to the biblical writers• Help address pressing issues in the church today by showing readers see how the biblical writers approached similar issues in their day• Ideal for sermon preparation and for other teaching in the churchWord Biblical Themes are an ideal resource for any reader who has used and benefited from the Word Biblical Commentary series, and will help pastors, bible teachers, and students as they seek to understand and apply God’s word to their ministry and learning.

Kyrie Eleison Its Liturgical Use and Theological Significance in the Roman Ambrosian and Hispano Mozarabic Rites

542 Cf. J. JENSEN-W. H. IRWIN, “Isaiah 1–39,” in NJBC, 230–231. 543. In the Latin, English, ... 547 Cf. J. D. W. WATTs, Word Biblical Commentary, vol. 24: Isaiah 133, edd. ... Rv 18,6). of 6 apbā24s 33,2: 27 j6 s, z ő O &/opia.

Kyrie Eleison  Its Liturgical Use and Theological Significance in the Roman  Ambrosian and Hispano Mozarabic Rites

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The Messianic Matrix

28 Peter C. Craigie, Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 19: Psalms 1-50 (Dallas: Word, 1998), n.p. on CD-ROM. 29 Ibid. 30 Ladd, A Theology of the New Testament, 164. 31 Watts, Word Biblical Commentary, Volume 24: Isaiah 1-33, ...

The Messianic Matrix

"The Messianic Matrix" is a thrilling journey of theological concepts that define the Pentecostal experience. It is a groundbreaking and sweeping endeavor that utilizes the best of modern scholarship.

The Oxford Handbook of Isaiah

“Breaking an Eternal Covenant: Isaiah 24:5 and Inner-Isaianic Discourse about Covenant. ... “La composition littéraire de l'apocalypse d'Isaïe (Is., XXIV–XXVII).” EThL 50 (1974): 5–38. Watts, John D. W. Isaiah 133. Vol.

The Oxford Handbook of Isaiah

"The book of Isaiah is one of the longest books in the Hebrew Bible. It contains some of the most hauntingly beautiful passages in the entire Bible, and it has influenced Judaism and Christianity to an exceptional extent. Many of its passages feature in the liturgies of the synagogue and of the church. In Jewish tradition, the threefold acclamation of God's holiness in Isa 6:3 is recited in prayers throughout the day: it is, for example, among the benedictions framing the recitation of the Shema' in the morning and part of the central prayer called the Amidah. In Christian tradition, Isa 7:14 is understood to predict the virgin birth; and Isa 9:1-7, the incarnation. Isa 40:3-5 is identified as speaking about John the Baptist, and Isa 52:13-53:12 is read on Good Friday to illustrate Jesus's suffering, death, and resurrection"--

Word Biblical Themes Collection

References in the text that follows which refer to the companion volumes in the Word Biblical Commentary are abbreviated as WBC, with volume 24 referring to Isaiah 133 and volume 25 referring to Isaiah 34–66. PART 1 KNOWING GOD AND HIS ...

Word Biblical Themes Collection

A companion series to the acclaimed Word Biblical Commentary. Finding the great themes of the books of the Bible is essential to the study of God's Word and to the preaching and teaching of its truths. These themes and ideas are often like precious gems: they lie beneath the surface and can only be discovered with some difficulty. While commentaries are useful for helping readers understand the content of a verse or chapter, they are not usually designed to help the reader to trace important subjects systematically within a given book a Scripture. The Word Biblical Themes series helps readers discover the important themes of a book of the Bible. This series distills the theological essence of a given book of Scripture and serves it up in ways that enrich the preaching, teaching, worship, and discipleship of God's people. Volumes in this series: Written by top biblical scholars Feature authors who wrote on the same book of the Bible for the Word Biblical Commentary series Distill deep and focused study on a biblical book into the most important themes and practical applications of them Give reader's an ability to see the "big picture" of a book of the Bible by understanding what topics and concerns were most important to the biblical writers Help address pressing issues in the church today by showing readers see how the biblical writers approached similar issues in their day Ideal for sermon preparation and for other teaching in the church Volumes in the Word Biblical Themes: 15-Volume Set include: Exodus by John I. Durham Joshua by Trent C. Butler 1 and 2 Kings by T. R. Hobbs 1 and 2 Chronicles by Roddy L. Braun Psalms by Leslie C. Allen Isaiah by John D. W. Watts Daniel by John Goldingay Hosea-Jonah by Douglas Stuart Micah-Malachi by Ralph L. Smith John by George R. Beasley-Murray 1 and 2 Corinthians by Ralph P. Martin Philippians by Gerald F. Hawthorne 1 and 2 Thessalonians by Leon Morris 1 Peter by J. Ramsey Michaels 2 Peter and Jude by Richard J. Bauckham Word Biblical Themes are an ideal resource for any reader who has used and benefited from the Word Biblical Commentary series, and will help pastors, bible teachers, and students as they seek to understand and apply God's word to their ministry and learning.

Pre Nicene Christology in Paschal Contexts

Ronald E.Clements,Isaiah1–39(London:Marshal,Morgan &Scott,1980),34;John D.W.Watts,Isaiah 133 as vol. 24 of World Biblical Commentary (Waco, TX: World Books, 1985), 133–134; John J. Collins, Isaiah (Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical ...

Pre Nicene Christology in Paschal Contexts

In Pre-Nicene Christology in Paschal Contexts Dragoş A. Giulea re-examines the earliest texts concerning the festival of Easter in light of Jewish Second Temple traditions.

Dialogue in the Book of Signs

A Polyvalent Analysis of John 1:19-12:50 Johnson Thomaskutty ... “John 1:43–51 and 'The Son of Man' in the Fourth Gospel. ... Hong Kong: Sutton Publishing Limited. Watts, J.D.W., 1985. Isaiah 133. Word Biblical Commentary. Vol. 24.

Dialogue in the Book of Signs

Dialogue in the Book of Signs offers a polyvalent analysis of John 1:19-12:50 at the micro-, meso-, and macro-levels. With the help of several synchronic methods, including genre, narrative, rhetorical, and dramatic, the author analyzes the content, form, and function of John’s dialogue.

The Joy of Exile

Evangelical Theological Society Papers (3 April 1992): 1-6. Hubbard, David A., and Glenn W. Barker, eds. Word Biblical Commentary. Vol. 24, Isaiah 1- 33, by John D. W. Watts. Dallas: Word Books, 1985. Hubbard, David A., and Glenn W.

The Joy of Exile

The Joy of Exile presents a well-researched commentary on the last book of the Bible. It demonstrates Revelation's dependence on Old Testament imagery while exploring its transforming message for disciples in all times and places. The Joy of Exile encourages readers to see this often misunderstood and misrepresented book as an encouraging guide to faithful discipleship in a rebellious world.

Ex Auditu Volume 24

1 Der Derian notes that, contrary to the implicit meaning and value we habitually ascribe to it, ... William Shakespeare, Macbeth, 3.5.32–33. 4. ... Walter Brueggemann, Isaiah 1–39 (Louisville: Westminster John Knox, 1998), 102 VOL. 24 ...

Ex Auditu   Volume 24

CONTENTS: Introduction Klyne Snodgrass Fear in the Garden: The State of Emergency and the Politics of Blessing Scott Bader-Saye Response to Bader-Saye Amy E. Black "In God We Trust"? The Challenge of the Prophets R. W. L. Moberly Response to Moberly Robert L. Hubbard, Jr. Imagining the Unthinkable: Exposing the Idolatry of National Security in Amos M. Daniel Carroll R. Response to Carroll Robert D. Haak Security and Self-Sufficiency: A Comparison of Paul and Epictetus John M. G. Barclay Response to Barclay Joel Willitts Martin Luther's Teachings on Security in the Psalms and Their Significance for the Art of Reading Scripture G. Sujin Pak Response to Pak Jo Ann Deasy "One Who Trusts Will Not Panic": Providence and the Prophet of Desecuritization Jill Carson Colwell Response to Colwell Darrell Cosden The Radical Insecurity of Idolatry? Or of Faith? Randall C. Zachman Response to Zachmann Kyle J. A. Small Homeland Insecurity: The Spiritual Lust for an Escape Clause Ben Witherington III Response to Witherington Andy Johnson Hoofbeats Full of Grace? Andy Johnson Security William H. Willimon Protecting God: Psalm 91, Luke 4:1-14 Brent Laytham

Writing and Reading the Scroll of Isaiah

Rendtorff's contributions to the study of Isaiah are substantive. ... Sweeney proposes a detailed outline which represents the structure of the book as a whole.23 Part I (1:133:24) has to do with God's plans for worldwide sovereignty ...

Writing and Reading the Scroll of Isaiah

The studies in this volume investigate Isaiah's use of early sacred tradition, the editing and contextualization of oracles within the Isaianic tradition itself, and the interpretation of the book of Isaiah in later traditions (as in the various versions and interpretations of the text).

Psalm 49 and the Path to Redemption

Online: http://search.atlaonline.com. Van Buren, E. Douglas. “The God Ningizzida.” Iraq 1.1 (1934) 60–89. Watts, John D. W. Isaiah 133. In Word Biblical Commentary. Vol. 24. Edited by John D. W. Watts. Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 1985.

Psalm 49 and the Path to Redemption

In Psalm 49 and the Path to Redemption, Janet Smith revisits her PhD dissertation, Dust or Dew: Immortality in the Ancient Near East and in Psalm 49, reconfiguring the book for a general audience and expanding it to focus on a theme of biblical redemption. The new work takes the reader through the development of Israel's belief in an afterlife, both the positive hope but also the negative fate of those who are spiritually impoverished. Beyond that, Psalm 49 takes the reader into the mind and heart of the sages and priests who wrote many of the psalms. There we find how much we share with them emotionally and spiritually. Since Christianity is a movement with roots in the Old Testament, the reader is introduced to some important redemption concepts as expressed by Jesus Christ. Finally, the book reviews a few modern near-death experiences to ask if the Scriptures regarding afterlife have relevance today. This book is thought provoking and should cause anyone reading it to think about their own personal path to redemption.

A Consuming Passion

Watts, John D. W. Isaiah 133. Word Biblical Commentary, vol. 24. Waco, TX: Word, 1985. Wengst, Klaus. Das Johannesevangelium: 2. Teilband: Kapitel 11–21. Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 2007. Wenham, John. “The Case for Conditional Immortality.

A Consuming Passion

This diverse collection of essays in honor of Edward William Fudge explores the topics of hell and immortality, for which Fudge has been widely known through his magnum opus, The Fire That Consumes. Most Christians believe people will live and suffer in hell forever, but Fudge defends a view known historically as "conditional immortality." He and a growing minority of Christians believe God will grant immortality only to those who meet the condition of being united with Christ on the Last Day, while those who do not will perish forever. Although Christians sharing Fudge's view have defended it both before and after him, conditionalists today still point to The Fire That Consumes as the seminal treatment of the topic. In July 2014, Christians from around the world gathered at the inaugural Rethinking Hell conference, to celebrate Fudge's life and work and to discuss the nature of hell in an open and respectful forum. This volume contains most of the essays presented at that conference, and several others volunteered by conditionalists since then, as a gift to Fudge for the tremendous impact he has had on them, and for the continued work he does for God's kingdom.

A View from Above

1890 Watts, John D.W., “Isaiah 1-33,” Vol.24 of Word Biblical Commentary (Waco: Word Books), 1985 Webber, David, “Cyberspace: The Beast's Worldwide Spiderweb,” Foreshocks of Antichrist, 495.

A View from Above

Imagine what your Christian development would be like if ? you grasped the true character of God. ? you were captivated by appreciation of and love for God's Word. ? you were not frightened away by the ?haunted house? of Revelation. ? you appreciated how the early church's experience influenced the message of Revelation. ? you understood how various viewpoints on Revelation developed over time. ? you enjoyed a perspective which prevents tunnel vision. ? you understood viewpoints about which you were previously unaware. ? you esteemed fellow believers who have different understandings of Revelation. ? you appreciated how the meaning of Jesus? sacrifice is pictured in Revelation. ? you practiced the message of Revelation in everyday life. ? you were strengthened by an unshakable faith in God. ? your faith was heartfelt and growing rather than formal or ritualistic. ? you were strong enough to stand firm in the face of any and all spiritual opposition. ? you were known for your moral and spiritual purity. ? you were able to resist the seductions of our culture. ? you demonstrated the sacrificial style of Jesus rather than the self-serving style of society. ? you enjoyed the blessings of those who ?keep the words? of Revelation's message. ? your anticipation of Jesus? return rose above a distracting concern with earthquakes, wars, and developing social events. ? you appreciated your present and future spiritual realities. ? you were eager rather than fearful about the future. ? you enjoyed the depths of the relationship toward which God is moving us.