Jane Austen: The Novels

Jane Austen: The Novels


The Complete Novels of Jane Austen

The Complete Novels of Jane Austen

Jane Austen is without question, one of England's most enduring and skilled novelists. With her wit, social precision, and unerring ability to create some of literature's most charismatic and believable heroines, she mesmerises her readers as much today as when her novels were first published. Whether it is her sharp, ironic gaze at the Gothic genre invoked by the adventures of Catherine Morland in Northanger Abbey; the diffident and much put-upon Fanny Price struggling to cope with her emotions in Mansfield Park; her delightfully paced comedy of manners and the machinations of the sisters Elinor and Marianne in Sense and Sensibility; the quiet strength of Anne Elliot in Persuasion succeeding in a world designed to subjugate her very existence; and Emma - 'a heroine whom no one but myself will like' teased Austen - yet another irresistible character on fire with imagination and foresight. Indeed not unlike her renowned creator. Jane Austen is as sure-footed in her steps through society's whirlpools of convention and prosaic mores as she is in her sometimes restrained but ever precise and enduring prose.

Jane Austen's Novels

The Fabric of Dialogue

Jane Austen's Novels


Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen

Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen

Mastering the Novels of Jane Austen is the ideal companion for anyone studying the works of this endearing literary figure. An engaging account of the six most-read Austen novels, this book captures the imagination with its fresh and lively approach. - Provides a detailed critique of Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and Persuasion - Links the significance of the works from the past to the present day in the light of contemporary attitudes to women, tradition, and innovation - Explores the influence of art, architecture, music, literature, theology, philosophy, history and politics in the novels - Discusses both traditional and contemporary literary theory, and examines Austen's use of wit and irony, and the nuances of her vocabulary If you are looking for a book that will entertain, challenge, and illuminate your understanding of Jane Austen, this is it! A must-have guide for anyone preparing for exams or looking to gain the maximum satisfaction from their reading of the novels of this much-loved author.

Jane Austen

The Dialectics of Self-actualization in Her Novels

Jane Austen


Jane Austen: Novels, Letters and Memoirs

Jane Austen: Novels, Letters and Memoirs

First published in 1995. Here, republished for the first time,is the first edition text of Jane Austen's much loved classic masterpieces. A rare and inaccessible resource for most scholars, the first editions are unique documents in the history of English literature. Covering Northanger Abbey & Persuasion Vol III.

Jane Austen

The Six Novels

Jane Austen

First published in 1965, this reissued work by Wendy Craik provides a thorough and extensive study of Jane Austen's six complete novels: Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion. This is a truly groundbreaking study of Austen which, in addition to a close analysis of the novels themselves, also goes on investigate the principles by which Jane Austen selected and arranged her material.

Female Relationships in Jane Austen's Novels

A Critique of the Female Ideal Propagated in 18th Century Conduct Literature

Female Relationships in Jane Austen's Novels


Between Self and World

The Novels of Jane Austen

Between Self and World

In this detailed historical analysis of Jane Austen's fictional representation of the individual subject, Thompson argues that Austen's notions of private experience and public performance are neither natural nor eternal, but are peculiar to her period and that these notions are best understood in Georg Lukacs's terms of the objectification of social relations under capital. In Austen's language and in her descriptive technique, we can discern a recurrent pattern in which the fundamental elements of her fictional world, material things as well as emotions, are indicated but not described--they are briefly exposed and then withdrawn again from view. The "inner life" of characters in general is both presented and protected by a pattern of privacy. Austen's representational technique, her form of narrative, needs to be related to the social history of privacy. And, when combined with the the later discussions of changing concepts of language, character, and marriage, we can trace the development of some modern notions of individuality, interiority, intimacy, and romance. We see that despite Austen's self-conscious political, moral, and religious conservatism, and despite her class identification with the gentry and their sentiments of noblesse oblige, the way in which Austen's heroine defines herself in relation to all categories of existence is inevitably determined by the alienating effects of capital, under which social relations and practices are externalized and objectified and from which, consequently, the individual is alienated. Elizabeth Bennet and Emma Woodhouse as characters embody the interrelation between economic, political, and social changes and their private or domestic consequences. The author's concern is the relation between history and the individual subject and, moreover, the ways in which we have come to think in terms of just this sort of opposition. If "History is what hurts," as Fredric Jameson puts it, in Austen's novels, love is what soothes, for private or domestic romance comes to function as the ideological negation of history, a refuge into a "natural" and "timeless" world of privacy and intimacy. Intimacy functions to efface the ideological contradiction between social responsibility and private withdrawal. Austen's achievement is to integrate the privatization of human relations into the appropriate vehicle, the courtship narrative or domestic love story.