The Japanese Sword

One of the foremost experts on the Japanese sword describes their history andppreciations in this book, with photographs and illustrations.

The Japanese Sword

One of the foremost experts on the Japanese sword describes their history andppreciations in this book, with photographs and illustrations.

Modern Japanese Swords and Swordsmiths

In part three of this book, the authors present informative interviews with twenty-two modern smiths, who demonstrate how the blade's aesthetic power derives from a symmetry of the sword's basic elements-steel, shape, and texture-and this ...

Modern Japanese Swords and Swordsmiths

The lineage of the Japanese sword can be traced back over a thousand years, and throughout its long history the sword has emerged as one of Japan's most durable cultural assets. Part of its mythical appeal lies in the unique harmony of its historical roles as deadly hand-held weapon, embodiment of the samurai spirit, and powerful symbol of warfare. The types of sword that have been made, their forging methods, and the styles of blade have been influenced by historical events and shaped by developments in the means of combat, giving rise to five distinct periods and a host of styles and schools. The most recent period, gendaito, began in the late nineteenth century, during Japan's drive to modernize its military forces. The demand for traditional swords all but disappeared, and many schools and styles became virtually extinct. In this authoritative new book, Leon and Hiroko Kapp, together with leading swordsmith Yoshindo Yoshihara, coauthors of the bestselling The Craft of the Japanese Sword, describe this most recent period of sword history, and present the work of key craftsmen active today. Through a detailed chronicle of major events in the modern sword world, the authors illustrate the developments in sword-making, its movement into artistic spheres, and the challenges swordsmiths have faced over the last century. Many of today's smiths seek to revive the ancient arts of sword forging, and at the same time create a vital and meaningful artistic role for the sword in a modern context. In part three of this book, the authors present informative interviews with twenty-two modern smiths, who demonstrate how the blade's aesthetic power derives from a symmetry of the sword's basic elements-steel, shape, and texture-and this harmony affords the blade a singular and delicate beauty. Part four widens the scope beyond swordsmiths to include perspectives from other experts involved with gendaito, from martial arts practitioner to metallurgist. The book also includes comprehensive and intricate lineage charts of the major historical schools. The heightened aesthetic sense that characterizes the contemporary sword and its production has ushered in what can be categorized as a distinctly new era of sword history-shin-gendaito. Throughout this book the authors make a compelling argument for the introduction of this new term, which can more accurately reflect the dynamic changes that have taken place in this most modern chapter of sword history. Lavishly illustrated with rare historical photographs and works of the best smiths, including Living National Treasures, this will be essential reading for the student and connoisseur alike, as well as readers interested in skilled craftsmanship in general.

The Japanese Sword

The book also deals with the techniques used in the making of the sword and the associated terminology.

The Japanese Sword

Drawing on the V&A's magnificent collection, this illustrated survey examines the development of the Japanese sword in an historical and social context from the 8th to the 12th century. The development of the sword from its origins as one of the world's most effective cutting weapons in seen in the context of the emergence and development of Japan's ruling military class, the samurai, to whom it was indispensable both as a weapon and symbol of power. The book also deals with the techniques used in the making of the sword and the associated terminology. In addition to weapons from the V&A's own collections, illustrations include comparative materials from Japan's Tokyo National Museum, as well as prints showing graphic depictions of swords in action.

The Craft of the Japanese Sword

From raw steel to tempered blade, this text presents a visual account of thencient craft of swordmaking as practiced in modern Japan.

The Craft of the Japanese Sword

From raw steel to tempered blade, this text presents a visual account of thencient craft of swordmaking as practiced in modern Japan.

The Connoisseur s Book of Japanese Swords

Connoisseur's Book Japanese Swords is a Kodansha International publication.

The Connoisseur s Book of Japanese Swords

Connoisseur's Book Japanese Swords is a Kodansha International publication.

Legends and Stories around the Japanese Sword 2

The tantō Uraku Rai Kunimitsu In the first volume of the Legends around the
Japanese Sword we learnt that swords were considered as essential presents for
higher ranking bushi. As Hideyori received a tantō from Katō Kiyomasa, quasi as
 ...

Legends and Stories around the Japanese Sword 2


Art of the Japanese Sword

With 256 full-color pages, this sword book illustrates in meticulous detail how modern craftsmen use traditional methods to prepare their steel, forge the sword and create the unique hardened edge.

Art of the Japanese Sword

In The Art of the Japanese Sword, master swordsmith Yoshindo Yoshihara offers a detailed look at the entire process of Japanese sword making, including the finishing and appreciation of Japanese blades. Japanese sword art stands out in many ways: functionality as a weapon, sophisticated metallurgy and metal smithing, the shape of the blade itself—all contribute to the beauty of these remarkable weapons. The Art of the Japanese Sword conveys to the reader Japanese samurai sword history and Japanese sword care, as well as explaining how to view and appreciate a blade. With 256 full-color pages, this sword book illustrates in meticulous detail how modern craftsmen use traditional methods to prepare their steel, forge the sword and create the unique hardened edge. By gaining a good understanding of how a sword is actually made, the reader will be able to appreciate the samurai sword more fully. Topics include: Appreciating the Japanese sword History of the Japanese sword Traditional Japanese steel making Making the sword Finishing the sword

Japanese Swords

Cultural Icons of a Nation; The History, Metallurgy and Iconography of the
Samurai Sword (Downloadable Material) Colin M. Roach. (1332–1573), it can be
assumed that swords were appreciated for their artistic qualities. As it was also
from ...

Japanese Swords

With over 300 stunning photographs and woodblock prints along with extensive historical and cultural commentary, Japanese Swords is the ultimate authority on Samurai weaponry. Historically, Japanese warriors considered their swords to be far greater than simple weaponry. Their swords were both lethal tools and divine companions — social and religious icons. Traditionally worn by the samurai as a sign of social status, the Japanese sword represented the junction between the reigning military class and those whom they ruled. Moreover, the samurai sword was a technological and artistic marvel. Many scholars consider it to be the finest sword ever constructed. In terms of symbolism and historical importance, no other blade comes close to the Japanese sword. With a historical, iconographical, and technological perspective, author Cohn M. Roach provides an in-depth study of these magnificent weapons in Japanese Swords. This richly illustrated sword book weaves the blade's primary influences together, tracking its history and illuminating its progress from infancy to grandeur. By studying the evolution of the Japanese sword from this perspective, we better understand Japan and its warrior archetype. Combining research materials from multiple disciplines, Roach uses his expertise as an educator to guide readers through the sword's rise to greatness in a unique way. This book discusses the history, development, and spiritual symbolism of the sword, as well as the esoteric metallurgical techniques used in making it. It also covers the difficult training practices used by skilled swordsmen. Japanese Swords also includes a companion DVD featuring a beautifully-filmed documentary that explores the traditional swordmaker's craft. The DVD also contains an introduction to the Japanese sword at a sword shop in Kyoto and a visit to a dojo for a beginner's class in the medieval sword-drawing art called iaido.

Japanese Swords

Providing a rich history and detailed diagrams of various Japanese swords, this volume posits that the swords of Japan are the most effective and require the most skill to handle.

Japanese Swords


Japanese Swords

JAPANESE SWORDS Japanese swords (known as 'nihonto'), are, unsurprisingly
– Swords made in Japan. They come in many different sizes, shapes, fields of
application and methods of manufacture, with some of the more common
varieties ...

Japanese Swords

First published in 1913, this book contains a fascinating treatise on Japanese swords, in particular the 'katana', 'wakizashi', and 'tachi'. It includes interesting historical information, detailed descriptions, a discussion of notable sword smiths and warriors, details on manufacture, and much more. "Japanese Swords" is highly recommended for those with an interest in Japanese history and culture, and it would make for a worthy addition to collections of allied literature. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new introduction on fencing.

Japanese Swords

The individual books are excerpted from the previously published book, A History of Edged Weapon Warfare, also by Martina Sprague. Look for more books in this series in the near future.

Japanese Swords

The sword, a treasured combat arm and symbol of identity, status, and courage has held a special place in most countries of the world. The samurai, however, may have received unparalleled attention in the history of the sword. This brief introduction to medieval Japan demonstrates how the politically strong samurai shaped the view one held of battle. Following the abolishment of the samurai class, the Meiji Restoration, and the opening of Japan to the West in the nineteenth century, Japan was anxious to move ahead with modern military equipment and the building of a national army. Few traditional swords were made and the Japanese adopted western style cavalry sabers. In the twentieth century the sword continued to be carried into battle as a supplementary weapon; not necessarily practical for the battlefield but, nevertheless, serving an important function as a "crutch for the heart." The gunto, or new-army sword, which was modeled after the samurai katana but modernized to conform to western standards, was carried by army and navy officers and cavalry troops until Japan's fall at the end of World War II.This book focuses on the era that one normally associates with the medieval period. It starts by exploring the history of Japanese sword making, the development of metallurgic science, and the skill required of the swordsmith to forge a strong and battle-worthy blade that adhered to the standards followed by the samurai warrior class. It then covers samurai mentality and philosophy of sword fighting, with respect to the battlefield use of the katana and the dynamics of Japanese swordsmanship. It summarizes with a history of the gunto new-army sword and the practical and philosophical value this sword had to the twentieth-century soldier. The concluding remarks focus on the sword as a symbol of Japanese culture.Knives, Swords, and Bayonets: A World History of Edged Weapon Warfare is a book series that examines the history of edged weapons in Europe, Asia, Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East and surrounding areas before gunpowder increased the distance between combatants. The book series takes a critical look at the relationship between the soldier, his weapon, and the social and political mores of the times. Each book examines the historical background and metallurgic science of the knife, sword, or bayonet respectively, and explores the handling characteristics and combat applications of each weapon. The individual books are excerpted from the previously published book, A History of Edged Weapon Warfare, also by Martina Sprague. Look for more books in this series in the near future.

Japanese Sword

Japanese Sword


Japanese Swords

Japanese Swords


Single Edged Swords

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Single Edged Swords

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 37. Chapters: Japanese swords, Falchion, Backsword, Japanese swordsmithing, Japanese sword mountings, Dao, Kilij, Japanese swords in fiction, Falcata, Mameluke sword, Cutlass, Talwar, Shoami, Shamshir, Makhaira, Horimono, Messer, Hamon, Kopis, Umetada, Dussack, Karabela, Pulwar, Hunting sword. Excerpt: A Japanese sword, or nihont lit. Japanese sword), is one of the traditional bladed weapons (nihonto) of Japan. There are several types of Japanese swords, according to size, field of application and method of manufacture. Photo from 1860sIn modern times the most commonly known type of Japanese sword is the Shinogi-Zukuri katana, which is a single-edged and usually curved long sword traditionally worn by samurai from the 15th century onwards. Other types of Japanese swords include: tsurugi or ken, which is a double-edged sword; dachi, nodachi, tachi, which are older styles of a very long single-edged sword; wakizashi, a medium sized sword; and the tanto which is an even smaller knife sized sword . Although they are pole-mounted weapons, the naginata and yari are considered part of the nihont family due to the methods by which they are forged. Japanese swords are still commonly seen today; antique and modernly-forged swords can easily be found and purchased. Modern, authentic nihont are made by a few hundred swordsmiths. Many examples can be seen at an annual competition hosted by the All Japan Swordsmith Association, under the auspices of the Nihont Bunka Shink Ky kai (Society for the promotion of Japanese Sword Culture). Traditional Japanese long sword and various fittings. The word katana was used in ancient Japan and is still used today, whereas the old usage of the word nihont is found in the poem, the Song of Nihont, by the Song Dynasty poet Ouyang Xiu. The word nihont became more common in Japan...

Encyclopedia of Japanese Swords Paperback

“military sword.” Generic name to describe Japanese swords produced for use by
the Japanese army and navy after the disbandment of the samurai class. When
the Meiji government banned the public carrying of swords in 1876, most of the ...

Encyclopedia of Japanese Swords  Paperback

This completely new encyclopedic reference for the Japanese sword contains about 2,500 entries, many of them illustrated by photos and drawings. The Encyclopedia of Japanese Swords is an A-Z general encyclopedia covering each and every part of the sword: the blade, the mountings, the fittings, and all their different interpretations. Further, this encyclopedia also explains the literal or etymological meaning of each Japanese term and provides an even deeper insight into the subject.

The Art of Japanese Sword Polishing

The book illustrates the methods, materials and tools used for this process. But its true aim is to enable the reader to fully appreciate the beauty of a well-crafted Japanese sword.

The Art of Japanese Sword Polishing

To understand Japanese sword polishing is to understand the Japanese sword. Down through the years, the great sword connoisseurs in Japan have been sword polishers. A swordsmith can spend a large amount of time forging a classic sword, but refining and bringing out its final shape, color and texture so that all the details of the steel and hamon (the temper line) are clearly visible is the responsibility of another craftsman - the sword polisher. An experienced polisher can tell immediately by whom a blade was made, so discintctive is each smith's work and so vital is such knowledge to the skilled polisher.The Art of Japanese Sword Polishing is the first book in English to examine in great detail the polisher's techniques - skills it often takes up to ten years of apprenticeship to master. The book illustrates the methods, materials and tools used for this process. But its true aim is to enable the reader to fully appreciate the beauty of a well-crafted Japanese sword. As readers learn both how the sword polisher enhances the beauty of the blade and how he handles the problems of coaxing out its finest qualities through his polishing techniques, they will come to a deeper understanding of the fine art of making the Japanese sword and will be able to view, purchase or collect swords with greater pleasure.

Facts and Fundamentals of Japanese Swords

This is the first book to enable the reader to accurately judge the quality and pedigree of any sword. This book is the first English translation of a key reference title published in Japanese in 2005.

Facts and Fundamentals of Japanese Swords

Aims to enable the reader to accurately judge the quality and pedigree of any sword. This book is illustrated with 160 b/w photos and 140 drawings elucidating details from nakago (tang) controlled rusting and inscriptions to the shape, dimensions, style, patina and every other visible element of the blade itself. This is the first book to enable the reader to accurately judge the quality and pedigree of any sword. This book is the first English translation of a key reference title published in Japanese in 2005. Its value lies in its purpose, which is to ensure that the reader is