Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

Detailing the contents of the 1,204 texts inscribed in these 478 manuscripts, Nancy K. Florida's fully-indexed catalogue of Javanese-language manuscripts guides the reader through a wide range of materials.

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

Detailing the contents of the 1,204 texts inscribed in these 478 manuscripts, Nancy K. Florida's fully-indexed catalogue of Javanese-language manuscripts guides the reader through a wide range of materials.

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

This book completes a series of three volumes cataloguing the Javanese-language manuscripts housed in four repositories in the Central Javanese city of Surakarta that were preserved in microfilm under the auspices of the Cornell University ...

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

This book completes a series of three volumes cataloguing the Javanese-language manuscripts housed in four repositories in the Central Javanese city of Surakarta that were preserved in microfilm under the auspices of the Cornell University's Surakarta Manuscript Project. The present volume describes the manuscripts of the Radya Pustaka Museum and the private library of the late Panembahan Hardjonagoro, a body of materials that date from the early eighteenth to the early twentieth century. Detailing the contents of the 1,204 texts inscribed in these 478 manuscripts, Nancy K. Florida's fully-indexed catalogue guides the reader through a wide range of materials. The manuscripts catalogued include autobiographical writings; gamelan notation; works of calendrical divination; annotated translations of the Qur’an; compendia of colonial laws and regulations; Sufi poetry; royal genealogies; handbooks on horsemanship; histories of legendary heroes; and scripts for wayang performances. Each entry includes information of titles, authors, dates and places of composition, dates and places of inscription, identities of scribes and patrons, and concise descriptions of the contents. Each title is also provided with a subject categorization, along with notes on the physical size and condition of the original manuscript, descriptions of scripts and scribal styles, papers, and watermarks. It is an essential resource for researchers of Javanese history and culture.

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

The second volume of the annotated bibliography of Javanese manuscripts housed in the Reksa Pustaka library in Surakarta, the first institutionalized library in the Indies founded and administered by native Javanese.

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

The second volume of the annotated bibliography of Javanese manuscripts housed in the Reksa Pustaka library in Surakarta, the first institutionalized library in the Indies founded and administered by native Javanese.

Writing the Past Inscribing the Future

History as Prophesy in Colonial Java Nancy K. Florida, Professor of Javanese and Islamic Studies Nancy K Florida ... The first of a four - volume annotated catalog for these manuscripts , my Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscript ...

Writing the Past  Inscribing the Future

Located at the juncture of literature, history, and anthropology, Writing the Past, Inscribing the Future charts a strategy of how one might read a traditional text of non-Western historical literature in order to generate, with it, an opening for the future. This book does so by taking seriously a haunting work of historical prophecy inscribed in the nineteenth century by a royal Javanese exile—working through this writing of a colonized past to suggest the reconfiguration of the postcolonial future that this history itself apparently intends. After introducing the colonial and postcolonial orientalist projects that would fix the meaning of traditional writing in Java, Nancy K. Florida provides a nuanced translation of this particular traditional history, a history composed in poetry as the dream of a mysterious exile. She then undertakes a richly textured reading of the poem that discloses how it manages to escape the fixing of "tradition." Adopting a dialogic strategy of reading, Florida writes to extend—as the work’s Javanese author demands—this history’s prophetic potential into a more global register. Babad Jaka Tingkir, the historical prophecy that Writing the Past, Inscribing the Future translates and reads, is uniquely suited for such a study. Composing an engaging history of the emergence of Islamic power in central Java around the turn of the sixteenth century, Babad Jaka Tingkir was written from the vantage of colonial exile to contest the more dominant dynastic historical traditions of nineteenth-century court literature. Florida reveals how this history’s episodic form and focus on characters at the margins of the social order work to disrupt the genealogical claims of conventional royal historiography—thus prophetically to open the possibility of an alternative future.

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts

This book completes a series of three volumes cataloguing the Javanese-language manuscripts housed in four repositories in the Central Javanese city of Surakarta that were preserved in microfilm under the auspices of the Cornell University ...

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts


Indonesian Manuscripts from the Islands of Java Madura Bali and Lombok

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts. Volume 1. Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta. Ithaca, New York: Southeast Asia Program Cornell University. Florida, Nancy K. (2000). Javanese Literature in Surakarta ...

Indonesian Manuscripts from the Islands of Java  Madura  Bali and Lombok

Indonesian Manuscripts from the Islands of Java, Madura, Bali and Lombok is an original, pioneering, and richly illustrated work that discusses hitherto unaddressed features of manuscript traditions of these islands. The extensive description of palm-leaf manuscripts in particular opens up avenues for further study.

Traces of the Ramayana and Mahabharata in Javanese and Malay Literature

De stille kracht: Het Europese binnenlands bestuur op Java en Madoera, 1808–1942. Amsterdam: Bert Bakker, 1994. Florida, Nancy K. Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts. Volume 2: Manuscripts of the Mangkunagaran Palace.

Traces of the Ramayana and Mahabharata in Javanese and Malay Literature

Local renderings of the two Indian epics Ramayana and Mahabharata in Malay and Javanese literature have existed since around the ninth and tenth centuries. In the following centuries new versions were created alongside the old ones, and these opened up interesting new directions. They questioned the views of previous versions and laid different accents, in a continuous process of modernization and adaptation, successfully satisfying the curiosity of their audiences for more than a thousand years. Much of this history is still unclear. For a long time, scholarly research made little progress, due to its preoccupation with problems of origin. The present volume, going beyond identifying sources, analyses the socio-literary contexts and ideological foundations of seemingly similar contents and concepts in different periods; it examines the literary functions of borrowing and intertextual referencing, and calls upon the visual arts to illustrate the independent character of the epic tradition in Southeast Asia.

Historical Dictionary of Indonesia

Florida, Nancy. Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts. Vol. 1, Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Southeast Asia Program, 1993. ———. Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts. Vol.

Historical Dictionary of Indonesia

This third edition of Historical Dictionary of Indonesia contains a chronology, an introductory essay, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 900 cross-referenced entries on important personalities, politics, economy, foreign relations, religion, and culture. This book is an excellent access point for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Indonesia.

Tall Tree Nest of the Wind The Javanese Shadow play Dewa Ruci Performed by Ki Anom Soeroto

FloridA, nAncy K., 1993, Javanese literature in Surakarta manuscripts. Vol. I. Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta. Ithaca (nY): southeast Asia Program, cornell University. ------------, 1995, Writing the past, ...

Tall Tree  Nest of the Wind  The Javanese Shadow play Dewa Ruci Performed by Ki Anom Soeroto

Javanese shadow puppetry is a sophisticated dramatic form, often felt to be at the heart of Javanese culture, drawing on classic texts but with important contemporary resonance in fields like religion and politics. How to make sense of the shadow-play as a form of world-making? In Tall Tree, Nest of the Wind, Bernard Arps explores this question by considering an all-night performance of Dewa Ruci, a key play in the repertoire. Thrilling and profound, Dewa Ruci describes the mighty Bratasena’s quest for the ultimate mystical insight. The book presents Dewa Ruci as rendered by the distinguished master puppeteer Ki Anom Soeroto in Amsterdam in 1987. The book’s unusual design presents the performance texts together with descriptions of the sounds and images that would remain obscure in conventional formats of presentation. Copious annotations probe beneath the surface and provide an understanding of the performance's cultural complexity. These annotations explain the meanings of puppet action, music, and shifts in language; how the puppeteer wove together into the drama the circumstances of the performance in Amsterdam, Islamic and other religious ideas, and references to contemporary Indonesian political ideology. Also revealed is the performance’s historical multilayering and the picture it paints of the Javanese past. Tall Tree, Nest of the Wind not only presents an unrivalled insight into the artistic depth of wayang kulit, it exemplifies a new field of study, the philology of performance.

On the Subject of Java

The “SMP” reference, however, is based on the cataloging system of the Surakarta Manuscript Project (1980–83), ... The first of a fourvolume annotated catalog for these manuscripts, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts, vol.

On the Subject of  Java

What are the limits of cultural critique? What are the horizons? What are the political implications? John Pemberton explores these questions in this far-reaching ethnographic and historical interpretation of cultural discourse in Indonesia since 1965. Pemberton considers in particular how the appearance of order under Soeharto's repressive New Order regime is an effect of an enigmatic politics founded upon routine appeals to cultural values. Through a richly textured ethnographic account of events ranging from national elections to weddings, Pemberton simultaneously elucidates and disturbs the contours of the New Order cultural imaginary. He pursues the fugitive signs of circumstances that might resist the powers of New Order rule through unexpected village practices, among graveyard spirits, and within ascetic refuges. Key to this study is a reexamination of the historical conditions under which a discourse of culture emerges. Providing a close reading of a number of Central Javanese manuscripts from the late eighteenth century on, Pemberton outlines the conditions of knowledge formation in Indonesia since the beginning of Dutch colonial control. As he overturns common assumptions concerning colonial encounters, he discloses the gradual emergence in these texts of a discursive figure inscribed in contrast to the increasingly invasive presence of the Dutch: a figuration of difference that came to be called "Java."

Banishment and Belonging

Florida, Nancy K. Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta, vol. I. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993. Writing the Past, Inscribing the Future: History as Prophecy in ...

Banishment and Belonging

Lanka, Ceylon, Sarandib: merely three disparate names for a single island? Perhaps. Yet the three diverge in the historical echoes, literary cultures, maps and memories they evoke. Names that have intersected and overlapped - in a treatise, a poem, a document - only to go their own ways. But despite different trajectories, all three are tied to narratives of banishment and exile. Ronit Ricci suggests that the island served as a concrete exilic site as well as a metaphor for imagining exile across religions, languages, space and time: Sarandib, where Adam was banished from Paradise; Lanka, where Sita languished in captivity; and Ceylon, faraway island of exile for Indonesian royalty under colonialism. Utilising Malay manuscripts and documents from Sri Lanka, Javanese chronicles, and Dutch and British sources, Ricci explores histories and imaginings of displacement related to the island through a study of the Sri Lankan Malays and their connections to an exilic past.

Shadows of Empire

Many Dutch scholars and others interested in documenting Javanese literary and dramatic traditions focused excessive attention on the small percentage of Ramayana ... Florida , Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts , 1 : 234-38 .

Shadows of Empire

Shadows of Empire explores Javanese shadow theater as a staging area for negotiations between colonial power and indigenous traditions. Charting the shifting boundaries between myth and history in Javanese Mahabharata and Ramayana tales, Laurie J. Sears reveals what happens when these stories move from village performances and palace manuscripts into colonial texts and nationalist journals and, most recently, comic books and novels. Historical, anthropological, and literary in its method and insight, this work offers a dramatic reassessment of both Javanese literary/theatrical production and Dutch scholarship on Southeast Asia. Though Javanese shadow theater (wayang) has existed for hundreds of years, our knowledge of its history, performance practice, and role in Javanese society only begins with Dutch documentation and interpretation in the nineteenth century. Analyzing the Mahabharata and Ramayana tales in relation to court poetry, Islamic faith, Dutch scholarship, and nationalist journals, Sears shows how the shadow theater as we know it today must be understood as a hybrid of Javanese and Dutch ideas and interests, inseparable from a particular colonial moment. In doing so, she contributes to a re–envisioning of European histories that acknowledges the influence of Asian, African, and New World cultures on European thought—and to a rewriting of colonial and postcolonial Javanese histories that questions the boundaries and content of history and story, myth and allegory, colonialism and culture. Shadows of Empire will appeal not only to specialists in Javanese culture and historians of Indonesia, but also to a wide range of scholars in the areas of performance and literature, anthropology, Southeast Asian studies, and postcolonial studies.

Islam Translated

Literature, Conversion, and the Arabic Cosmopolis of South and Southeast Asia Ronit Ricci ... See Nancy K. Florida, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts, vol. 1: Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta (Ithaca: ...

Islam Translated

The spread of Islam eastward into South and Southeast Asia was one of the most significant cultural shifts in world history. As it expanded into these regions, Islam was received by cultures vastly different from those in the Middle East, incorporating them into a diverse global community that stretched from India to the Philippines. In Islam Translated, Ronit Ricci uses the Book of One Thousand Questions—from its Arabic original to its adaptations into the Javanese, Malay, and Tamil languages between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries—as a means to consider connections that linked Muslims across divides of distance and culture. Examining the circulation of this Islamic text and its varied literary forms, Ricci explores how processes of literary translation and religious conversion were historically interconnected forms of globalization, mutually dependent, and creatively reformulated within societies making the transition to Islam.

Exile in Colonial Asia

Ambon is part of the Moluccas Islands in the eastern part of the Indonesian archipelago, located approximately fifteen ... Florida, Nancy K. Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton ...

Exile in Colonial Asia

Exile was a potent form of punishment and a catalyst for change in colonial Asia between the seventeenth and early twentieth centuries. Vast networks of forced migration supplied laborers to emerging colonial settlements, while European powers banished rivals to faraway locations. Exile in Colonial Asia explores the phenomenon of exile in ten case studies by way of three categories: “kings,” royals banished as political exiles; “convicts,” the vast majority of those whose lives are explored in this volume, sent halfway across the world with often unexpected consequences; and “commemoration,” referring to the myriad ways in which the experience and its aftermath were remembered by those exiled, relatives left behind, colonial officials, and subsequent generations of descendants, devotees, historians, and politicians. Intended for a broad readership interested in the colonial period in Asia (South and Southeast Asia in particular), the volume encompasses a range of disciplinary perspectives: anthropology, gender studies, literature, history, and Asian, Australian, and Pacific studies. In addition to presenting fascinating, little-known, and varied case studies of exile in colonial Asia and Australia, the chapters collectively offer a sweeping, contextualized, comparative approach that links the narratives of diverse peoples and locales. Rather than confining research to the European colonial archives, whenever possible the authors put special emphasis on the use of indigenous primary sources hitherto little explored. Exile in Colonial Asia invites imaginative methodological innovation in exploring multiple archives and expands our theoretical frontiers in thinking about the interconnected histories of penal deportation, labor migration, political exile, colonial expansion, and individual destinies.

Historical Dictionary of Indonesia

Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts , Volume 1 : Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta . Ithaca , N.Y .: Cornell Southeast Asia Program , 1993 . [ 0010 ] . Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts , Volume 2 ...

Historical Dictionary of Indonesia

Indonesia is Asia's third largest country in both population and area, a sprawling tropical archipelago of some 180 million people from hundreds of ethnic groups with a complex and turbulent history. One of Asia's newly industrializing countries, it is already a major economic powerhouse. In over 800 clear and succinct entries, the dictionary covers people, places, and organizations, as well as economics, culture, and political thought from Indonesia's ancient history up until the recent past. Includes a comprehensive bibliography, maps, chronology, list of abbreviations, and appendix of election results and major office-holders. This second edition has been thoroughly updated and expanded to cover the events that have occurred in Indonesia's history in the past fifteen years.

The Malay Hikayat Mi r j Nabi Mu ammad

Florida, Nancy K. (1993) Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts. vol. 1, Introduction and Manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta. Ithaca, NewYork: Southeast Asia Program Cornell University. ——— (2000) Javanese Literature in ...

The Malay Hikayat Mi  r  j Nabi Mu   ammad

The Malay version of The Prophet Muḥammad’s Nocturnal Journey to Heaven and Hell has never been published in Malay or in English Translation. The book wants to enhance interest in this important text in the global Islamic literary tradition.

The Canon in Southeast Asian Literature

'Reading the unread in traditional Javanese literature', Indonesia 44: 1-15. (1993) Javanese literature in Surakarta manuscripts, Vol. 1. Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta. Ithaca, New York: Southeast Asia Program, ...

The Canon in Southeast Asian Literature

The literary canon is one of the most lively areas of debate in contemporary literary studies. This set of essays is both timely and original in its focus on the canon in South-East Asian literatures, covering Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. They vary in focus, from the broad panoramic survey of trends in a national literature to very specific discussions of the role of individuals in shaping a canon or the place of a particular text within a tradition, and from contemporary to traditional literature. They include discussions of the development of prose fiction, censorship and artistic freedom, the role of westerners in codifying indigenous literatures, the writing of literary history, the development of literary criticism and indigenous aesthetics.

Java Essay

According to Nancy Florida, it was composed during the reign of King Balitung, 898–910 AD (Nancy K. Florida, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: 1. Introduction and Manuscripts of the keraton Surakarta, Cornell University ...

Java Essay

Java Essay: The history and culture of a southern country encompasses many different aspects of the history of Java, Indonesia, offering a unique insight into the Asian country and exploring how its history has impacted on its culture. Author Masatoshi Iguchi explores a panoply of historical events, ranging from the deportation of Japanese Christians in the early 17th century to Batavia – the Indonesian capital now commonly known as Jakarta – to the history of the kingdoms that built Borobudur and Prambanan. The study of stone inscriptions from ancient and medieval times, as well as a number of old records and documents of both domestic and foreign origins, are intertwined with the author’s own insight and thought on the facts and events of Indonesia. Masatoshi’s personal experiences of visiting the indigenous people of Indonesia highlights the interesting nature of a country not yet fully understood. Within the book is an abundance of photographs and drawings, intended to provide readers with visual aids that further their insight into this country’s history and culture. Written in an accessible style, with reference to external sources, Java Essay is a history book that will appeal to readers with an interest in the history and culture of Indonesia. It will prove a fascinating read for academics, as well as travellers and visitors to Indonesia alike.