Joanna and Ulysses

A young Greek woman's unhappy memories of death and war cause her to seek solitude on the island of Santorini

Joanna and Ulysses

A young Greek woman's unhappy memories of death and war cause her to seek solitude on the island of Santorini

Joanna and Ulysses

Joanna and Ulysses

Joanna's holiday on the little Greek island of Santorini was meant to be a solitary one in which she would recover from the bitterness of the Greek war and her mothers's death--until she adopted Ulysses, the mistreated little donkey.

Joanna and Ulysses A Novel

A woman vacationing on Santorini provides care for a maltreated donkey.

Joanna and Ulysses  A Novel


Joanna and Ulysses

Joanna and Ulysses

An Athenian painter on an island holiday rescues a donkey from a brutal master, and in caring for the animal's wounds she heals her own.

Understanding May Sarton

Before turning to the two major novels of her early period , mention must be made of two shorter novellas : The Fur Person ( 1957 ) and Joanna and Ulysses ( 1963 ) . Her nostalgic tale The Fur Person celebrates her cat Tom Jones ...

Understanding May Sarton

Fulk provides a comprehensive study - and one that does not assume Sarton's writings to be of interest exclusively or even primarily to female readers. Rather than limiting Sarton's literary accomplishments to the categories of feminist and lesbian writing, as other critics have done, Fulk approaches them in a way that he contends "comes closer to the spirit of Sarton's work as she saw it.""--BOOK JACKET.

Wisconsin Library Bulletin

JOANNA AND ULYSSES . 1963. 127p . Norton , $ 3.95 . * A holiday on an Aegean Island to paint as the heart desires confronts the 30 - year - old Joanna , a modern woman of Athens who has spent years in family duties and looking after her ...

Wisconsin Library Bulletin


The Novels of May Sarton Volume One

Joanna in Joanna and Ulysses is a painter, but this is one of those Sarton fictions which I prefer to call fables, as Sarton herself sometimes calls them. One would particularly like to recommend all four of them to those who interest ...

The Novels of May Sarton Volume One

Three luminous novels from a New York Times–bestselling author and National Book Award finalist whose “prose leaves compelling echoes in one’s mind” (The New York Times Book Review). Throughout her long and acclaimed career, May Sarton refused to be categorized. As a memoirist, poet, and novelist, she broke new ground by openly exploring homosexuality, gender inequality, and other once taboo social issues. Gathered here in one volume are three of her most memorable and moving works of fiction. Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing: Widely regarded as her most important work, Sarton’s 1965 semiautobiographical novel centers upon Hillary Stevens, an author now in her twilight years. As she prepares to publish anew, Stevens sits down to discuss her life, the arc of her creative journey, and her love affairs—with both men and women. “The plot of this short novel is deceptively simple, the mood subtle, the feeling intense” (The New York Times Book Review). A Shower of Summer Days: The Irish estate home Dene Court has been shuttered for years—but this summer Violet Dene Gordon and her husband Charles return from British Burma, electrifying life in the sleepy village that adjoins Violet’s childhood home. As an added complication, Violet’s American niece is being sent to Ireland to separate her from an unsuitable romantic attachment. A National Book Award finalist, “A Shower of Summer Days establishes once and for all [Sarton’s] unmistakable authority” (The New York Times Book Review). The Magnificent Spinster: This “absolutely compelling . . . monument to love . . . [and] friendship” is actually the story of two women: Cam, the novel’s narrator, and the recently deceased Jane Reid. Unmarried and childless, Jane left no family to remember her, so Cam sets out to immortalize the life of her quietly remarkable friend and teacher in fiction (The Cleveland Plain Dealer).

Mrs Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing

Joanna in Joanna and Ulysses is a painter, but this is one of those Sarton fictions which I prefer to call fables, as Sarton herself sometimes calls them. One would particularly like to recommend all four of them to those who interest ...

Mrs  Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing

Sarton’s most important novel tells the story of a poet in her seventies, whose life is retold episodically during an interview with two writers from a literary magazine Hilary Stevens’s prolific career includes a provocative novel that shot her into the public consciousness years ago, and an oeuvre of poetry that more recently has consigned her to near-obscurity. Now in the twilight of her life, Hilary, who is both a feminist and a lesbian, is receiving renewed attention for an upcoming collection of poems, one that has brought two young reporters to her Cape Cod home. As Hilary prepares for the conversation, she recalls formative moments both large and small. She then embarks on the interview itself—a witty and intelligent discussion of her life, work, and romantic relationships with men and women. After the journalists have left, Hilary helps a visiting male friend with his anxiety over being gay and imparts wisdom about channeling his own creative passions. This ebook features an extended biography of May Sarton.

A Grievance Too Great

He tell me he think Ulysses kill my missus.” Joanna stopped laughing. “That's ridiculous,” she said. “Ulysses and Laura were killed in an accident with runaway horses.” Behind the door, Deme' was wiping sweat from his forehead.

A Grievance Too Great

Demetrius and Sophocles Xenopolos are the sons of a ruthless power mongering Greek father and a beautiful cultured American mother. Sophocles learns inhumanity, greed and murderous brutality from his father. Demetrius emulates his mother with his love of beauty, creativity and productivity. The two protagonists represent the aspects that exist in the consciousness of human nature: one that is manifested by bestial avariciousness and the other representing creativity, growth and a desire for utilizing the benevolence of nature. This is the duality that resides in the human consciousness existing in the saga against a background of the turbulent 1900’s in America. The story’s riveting action springs from the arid soil of the Arizona desert where sheer will and uncompromising determination fuels the creation of a thriving orange ranch. In this epic tome, spanning the tumultuous years from 1905 to the end of World War I, a woman is murdered, another is seduced, a child is kidnapped and south of the border another country is in the throes of a revolution. Within these pages, the reader will find the workings in the wheels of justice and a reconciliation of opposites that brings the peace that can be found in the half hidden recesses of the human heart. Cabral, a mistress of storytelling, weaves together plot, purpose and a cast of characters that unveil conflict, intimacy, and the compassion of human nature while it reflects a rich perspective of the philosophy, psychology and spirituality designed to captivate us with passion and pathos. Bouquets to Cabral for another great read. Aurora Terrenus Author of The Shroud of Sophia A Grievance Too Great, will sweep you into a younger America in which clearly defined characters will lead you through the riveting details of love, hate, the power of the human will and the desire to destroy that which is indestructible. An absolute must on your reading list. Jeannie Rejaunier Author of The Beauty Trap A Grievance Too Great is so much more than a story of revenge and regeneration. It is alive with living breathing characters that march right into your consciousness never to be forgotten. An exciting, unforgettable work. Jack Marlando Television writer/director

May Sarton

Nelson did not get much chance to heal May in 1963, for she was rather seldom there, though after poetry readings in January at Bryn Mawr, Radcliffe, and New York University (arranged by Bogan), she finished Joanna and Ulysses, ...

May Sarton

The first biography of May Sarton: a brilliant revelation of the life and work of a literary figure who influenced her thousands of readers not only by her novels and poetry, but by her life and her writings about it. May Sarton's career stretched from 1930 (early sonnets published in Poetry magazine) to 1995 (her journal At Eighty-Two). She wrote more than twenty novels, and twenty-five books of poems and journals. The acclaimed biographer Margot Peters was given full access to Sarton's letters, journals, and notes, and during five years of research came to know Sarton herself--the complex woman and artist. She gives us a compelling portrait of Sarton the actress, the poet, the novelist, the feminist, the writer who struggled for literary acceptance. She shows us, beneath Sarton's exhilarating, irresistible spirit, the needy courtier and seducer, the woman whose creativity was propelled by the psychic drama she created in others. We watch young May at age two as she is abruptly uprooted from her native Belgium by World War I, a child ignored both by her mother, who was intent on her own artistic vision and reluctant to cope with a child, and by her father, obsessed with his academic research. We see Sarton as a young girl in America, and then later, at nineteen, choosing a life in the theatre, landing a job in Eva Le Gallienne's Civic Repertory, and gathering what would become a tight-knit coterie of friends and lovers . . . Sarton beginning to write poetry and novels . . . Sarton making friends with Elizabeth Bowen and Julian Huxley, Erika and Klaus Mann, Virginia Woolf, the poet H.D.--charming and enlisting them with her work, her vitality, her hunger for love, driven by her need to conquer (among her conquests: Bowen, Huxley, and later his wife, Juliette). We see her intense friendships with literary pals, including Muriel Rukeyser (her lover), and Louise Bogan, Sarton's "literary sibling, who at once encouraged her and excluded her from a world in which Bogan was a central figure. We see Sarton begin to create in the spiritual journals that inspired the devotion of readers the image of a strong, independent woman who lived peacefully with solitude--an image that contradicted the reality of her neediness, loneliness, and isolation as she pushed away loved ones with her demands and betrayals. A fascinating portrait of one of our major literary figures--a book that for the first time reveals the life that she herself kept hidden.

The Ladies Home Journal

Joanna & Ulysses ( Continued ) ) ca 11 was struggling with all his strength to brea the tethering rope . He was straining 6 : 3 ward , shaking his head from side to side i is an odd , insistent , heartbreaking rhytha ) As the boat got ...

The Ladies  Home Journal


The Burro

After all , the best way to treat a pet burro is in the fashion that Joanna treated Ulysses , as narrated in a children's book by May Sarton . Warmhearted Joanna rescued overworked little Ulysses from a cruel donkey driver on the island ...

The Burro

The donkey, the onager, the koulan-the burro. All are names for one of the world’s most used and abused beasts of burden. If the horse was the animal of conquest, it was the lowly burro who made it possible for civilization to spread to the far reaches of the earth. Burros brought wood to the fires, raised water from the wells, toiled in the fields, carried the great and the poor, followed the conquistadors to the New World, and packed for the prospector and miner. Recommended by Cleveland Amory, renowned animal welfare advocate and founder of the Black Beauty Ranch, this book is an eloquent and appealing account of the burro’s past and present. It includes a chapter on the selection, feeding, and care of pet burros.

The New York Times Book Review

Ulysses " is the exho goes insane , but recovers . ... In many ways grim's Progress , " a twentieth - cen- Joanna Godden , and whose adven- that he had come “ Susan Spray " is a more mature in & cloud over tury " Inferno , " the trial ...

The New York Times Book Review


Hellenes and Hellions

begins when a thirty - year - old Athenian girl , Joanna , leaves her widowed father behind and goes to the ... Santorini helps Joanna to be reborn as an artist and a woman , the most effective cause being Ulysses , a little dying ...

Hellenes and Hellions


The Use of English

TEENAGE JOANNA AND ULYsses , by May Sarton . ( Blackie , 8s . 6d . ] A ROOF OVER YOUR HEAD , by Bill Naughton . [ Blackie , 1os . 6d . ] THIS TIME NEXT WEEK , by Leslie Thomas . ( Blackie , 10s . 6d . ] ...

The Use of English


Joanna and Ulysse

Joanna's holiday on the little Greek island of Santorini was meant to be a solitary one in which she would recover from the bitterness of the Greek war and her mothers's death--until she adopted Ulysses, the mistreated little donkey.

Joanna and Ulysse

Joanna's holiday on the little Greek island of Santorini was meant to be a solitary one in which she would recover from the bitterness of the Greek war and her mothers's death--until she adopted Ulysses, the mistreated little donkey.

Images of Women in Fiction

In Joanna and Ulysses , Joanna , like Hilary , is an artist . On her vacation island she develops her talents to their fullest after forming a warm attachment with a donkey which she buys to save him from the brutal beatings of his ...

Images of Women in Fiction