Journey to Accompong

Journey to Accompong


Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham

His praise for Journey to Accompong demonstrates that he perceived the text to be an extension of his own anthropological method, which sought to shift the focus from cultural practices onto practitioners themselves in order to explore ...

Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham

Josephine Baker and Katherine Dunham were the two most acclaimed and commercially successful African American dancers of their era and among the first black women to enjoy international screen careers. Both also produced fascinating memoirs that provided vital insights into their artistic philosophies and choices. However, difficulties in accessing and categorizing their works on the screen and on the page have obscured their contributions to film and literature.Hannah Durkin investigates Baker and Dunham’s films and writings to shed new light on their legacies as transatlantic artists and civil rights figures. Their trailblazing dancing and choreography reflected a belief that they could use film to confront racist assumptions while also imagining—within significant confines—new aesthetic possibilities for black women. Their writings, meanwhile, revealed their creative process, engagement with criticism, and the ways each mediated cultural constructions of black women's identities. Durkin pays particular attention to the ways dancing bodies function as ever-changing signifiers and de-stabilizing transmitters of cultural identity. In addition, she offers an overdue appraisal of Baker and Dunham's places in cinematic and literary history.

The Peoples of the Caribbean

Accompong is a Maroon settlement in the remote area of central-western Jamaica known as the Cockpit Country. ... recount folk tales, sell goods, chant, and dance, as well take part in war dances, road marches and sing treaty songs.

The Peoples of the Caribbean

Offers a comprehensive guide to the archaeology and traditional culture of the Caribbean.

People Get Ready

Katherine Dunham's travels and writings constitute another extremely complex case study in African American and ... Like Hurston, Dunham visited the Accompong Maroons, publishing a personalized account in Journey to Accompong (1937).

People Get Ready

Throughout this book, Kevin Meehan offers historical and theoretical readings of Caribbean and African American interaction from the 1700s to the present. By analyzing travel narratives, histories, creative collaborations, and political exchanges, he traces the development of African American/Caribbean dialogue through the lives and works of four key individuals: historian Arthur Schomburg, writer/archivist Zora Neale Hurston, poet Jayne Cortez, and politican Jean-Bertrand Aristide. People Get Ready examines how these influential figures have reevaluated popular culture, revised the relationship between intellectuals and everyday people, and transformed practices ranging from librarianship and anthropology to poetry and broadcast journalism. This discourse, Meehan notes, is not free of contradictions, and misunderstandings arise on both sides. In addition to noting dialogues of unity, People Get Ready focuses on instances of intellectual elitism, sexim, color, prejudice, imperialism, national, chauvinism, and other forms of mutual disdain that continue to limit African American and Caribbean solidarity.

Women At Sea

Katherine Dunham's travels and writings constitute another extremely complex case study in Caribbean travel writing. ... Like Hurston, Dunham visited the Accompong Maroons, publishing a personalized account in her monograph, Journey to ...

Women At Sea

From cross-dressing pirates to servants and slaves, women have played vital and often surprising roles in the navigation and cultural mapping of Caribbean territory. Yet these experiences rarely surface in the increasing body of critical literature on women s travel writing, which has focused on European or American women traveling to exotic locales as imperial subjects. This stellar collection of essays offers a contestatory discourse that embraces the forms of travelogue, autobiography, and ethnography as vehicles for women s rewriting of "flawed" or incomplete accounts of Caribbean cultures. This study considers writing by Caribbean women, such as the slave narrative of Mary Prince and the autobiography of Jamaican nurse Mary Seacole, and works by women whose travels to the Caribbean had enormous impacts on their own lives, such as Aphra Behn and Zora Neale Hurston. Ranging across cultural, historical, literary, and class dimensions of travel writing, these essays give voice to women writers who have been silenced, ignored, or marginalized.

Harlem s Glory

KATHERINE DUNHAM Twenty - Seventh Day , from Journey to Accompong This afternoon I was very despondent . Mai was away on private business of her own , Ba ' Teddy and Ba'Weeyums were at work in the fields , Rachel and Hannah and Sweetie ...

Harlem s Glory

Gathers little-known writings from African American women

Katherine Dunham

Herskovits was " thrilled with her diary , " about the Accompong trip , which she sent to him from the field . ... 15 Individuals Dunham came to know in Accompong were named and vividly characterized in Journey to ACcompong ...

Katherine Dunham

She believes that dancing involves the development of an entire person and that the rituals and traditions of dance are integral to the study of culture. Throughout her career she has been a living model of the socially responsible artist working to wet cultural appetites and combat social injustice. Building on Dunham's published memoirs. A Touch of Innocence and Island Possessed. Joyce Aschenbrenner's multifaceted portrait blends personal observations based on her own interactions with Dunham, archival documents, and interviews with Dunham's colleagues, students, and members of the Katherine Dunham Dance Company. Integrating these sources, Aschenbrenner characterizes the social, familial, and cultural environment of Dunham's upbringing and the intellectual and artistic community she embraced at the University of Chicago that laid the groundwork for her development as a dancer, anthropologist, and humanitarian.

Listening for Africa

In a draft version of her Journey to Accompong, Dunham slips into the discourse of primitivism in describing musical ... revivalists and the descendants of Accompong's runaway slaves: “When the travelling band of 'revivalists' visits, ...

Listening for Africa

In Listening for Africa David F. Garcia explores how a diverse group of musicians, dancers, academics, and activists engaged with the idea of black music and dance’s African origins between the 1930s and 1950s. Garcia examines the work of figures ranging from Melville J. Herskovits, Katherine Dunham, and Asadata Dafora to Duke Ellington, Dámaso Pérez Prado, and others who believed that linking black music and dance with Africa and nature would help realize modernity’s promises of freedom in the face of fascism and racism in Europe and the Americas, colonialism in Africa, and the nuclear threat at the start of the Cold War. In analyzing their work, Garcia traces how such attempts to link black music and dance to Africa unintentionally reinforced the binary relationships between the West and Africa, white and black, the modern and the primitive, science and magic, and rural and urban. It was, Garcia demonstrates, modernity’s determinations of unraced, heteronormative, and productive bodies, and of scientific truth that helped defer the realization of individual and political freedom in the world.

New Orleans in the Atlantic World

43 A decade later in 1947, Hurston discussed Dunham's research on the Maroons, Journey to Accompong, in a review entitled ''Thirty Days Among Maroons,'' the title of which included the following advertisements-for-myself subtext: ...

New Orleans in the Atlantic World

The thematic project ‘New Orleans in the Atlantic World’ was planned immediately after hurricane Katrina and focuses on what meteorologists have always known: the city’s identity and destiny belong to the broader Caribbean and Atlantic worlds as perhaps no other American city does. Balanced precariously between land and sea, the city’s geohistory has always interwoven diverse cultures, languages, peoples, and economies. Only with the rise of the new Atlantic Studies matrix, however, have scholars been able to fully appreciate this complex history from a multi-disciplinary, multilingual and multi-scaled perspectivism. In this book, historians, geographers, anthropologists, and cultural studies scholars bring to light the atlanticist vocation of New Orleans, and in doing so they also help to define the new field of Atlantic Studies. This book was published as a special issue of Atlantic Studies.

African Sovereigns

Katherine Dunham and Ted Cook, Katherine Dunham's Journey to Accompong (New York: Henry Holt, 1946), 44. 78. “Jamaicans Have Roots in Ghana,” Afro-American (Baltimore), August 13, 1960. 79. Laura Tanna, Jamaican Folk Tales and Oral ...

African Sovereigns

The Workings of Diaspora shows how the lived experience of Jamaican Maroons is linked to the African Diaspora. The author demonstrates that an examination of Jamaican Maroon communities, particularly their socio-political development, can further highlight the significance of the African Diaspora as an analytical tool.

Resources Planning and Environmental Management in a Changing Caribbean

At the time of Katherine Dunham's journey to Accompong in 1941 , while hunting was waning , peasant marketing by mule still complemented cultivation ( Dunham , 1946 , in Barker and Spence , 1988 : 200 ) . With the construction of the ...

Resources  Planning and Environmental Management in a Changing Caribbean

This volume reports on contemporary research by geographers and others into resource management and planning issues in the Caribbean region. The common theme is the search for developmental strategies that focus on social and economic needs without further deterioration of the resource base.

The Asante World

118 Dunham, Katherine Dunham's Journey to Accompong, 44. 119 “Jamaicans Have Roots in Ghana,” Afro-American (Baltimore), August 13, 1960. 120 Laura Tanna, Jamaican Folk Tales and Oral Histories (Kingston: Institute of Jamaica ...

The Asante World

The Asante World provides fresh perspectives on the Asante, the largest Akan group in Southern Ghana, and what new scholars are thinking and writing about the "world the Asante made." By employing a thematic approach, the volume interrogates several dimensions of Asante history including state formation, Asante-Ahafo and Bassari-Dagomba relations in the context of Asante northward expansion, and the expansion to the south. It examines the role of Islam which, although extremely intense for just a short time, had important ramifications. Together the essays excavate key aspects of Asante political economy and culture, exemplified in kola nut production, the kente/adinkra cloth types and their associated symbols, proverbs, and drum language. The Asante World explores the Asante origins of Jamaican maroons, Asante secular government, contemporary politics of progress, governance through the institution of Ahemaa or Queenmothers, epidemiology and disease, and education in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Featuring innovative and insightful contributions from leading historians of the Asante world, this volume is essential reading for advanced undergraduates, postgraduates, and scholars concerned with African Studies, African diaspora history, the history of Ghana and the Gold Coast, the history of Islam in Africa, and Asante history.

Darkening Mirrors

Dunham wrote accounts of her travels and research, including Journey to Accompong, about her experience in Jamaica, and Dances of Haiti and Island Possessed (1969), about her work in Haiti.

Darkening Mirrors

Darkening Mirrors analyzes the complicated relationships between African American identity, as reflected in performances, and the forces of imperialist and racial oppression.

Katherine Dunham

37 Third, Hurston castigated Dunham for living in Accompong for only thirty days. Such a short visit, Hurston wrote in her review of Journey to Accompong, “hardly affords time enough for the fieldworker to scratch the surface.

Katherine Dunham

One of the most important dance artists of the twentieth century, dancer and choreographer Katherine Dunham (1909-2006) created works that thrilled audiences the world over. As an African American woman, she broke barriers of race and gender, most notably as the founder of an important dance company that toured the United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Australia for several decades. Through both her company and her schools, she influenced generations of performers for years to come, from Alvin Ailey to Marlon Brando to Eartha Kitt. Dunham was also one of the first choreographers to conduct anthropological research about dance and translate her findings for the theatrical stage. Katherine Dunham: Dance and the African Diaspora makes the argument that Dunham was more than a dancer-she was an intellectual and activist committed to using dance to fight for racial justice. Dunham saw dance as a tool of liberation, as a way for people of African descent to reclaim their history and forge a new future. She put her theories into motion not only through performance, but also through education, scholarship, travel, and choices about her own life. Author Joanna Dee Das examines how Dunham struggled to balance artistic dreams, personal desires, economic needs, and political commitments in the face of racism and sexism. The book analyzes Dunham's multiple spheres of engagement, assessing her dance performances as a form of black feminist protest while also presenting new material about her schools in New York and East St. Louis, her work in Haiti, and her network of interlocutors that included figures as diverse as ballet choreographer George Balanchine and Senegalese president Léopold Sédar Senghor. It traces Dunham's influence over the course of several decades from the New Negro Movement of the 1920s to the Black Power Movement of the late 1960s and beyond. By drawing on a vast, never-utilized trove of archival materials along with oral histories, choreographic analysis, and embodied research, Katherine Dunham: Dance and the African Diaspora offers new insight about how this remarkable woman built political solidarity through the arts.

Thinking Through Theatre and Performance

Dunham, Katherine (1946), Journey to Accompong, New York: H. Holt and Company. Re-issued in 2013 as Katherine Dunham's Journey to Accompong, Literary Licensing, LLC. Dunham, Katherine (1959), A Touch of Innocence, New York:

Thinking Through Theatre and Performance

Thinking Through Theatre and Performance presents a bold and innovative approach to the study of theatre and performance. Instead of topics, genres, histories or theories, the book starts with the questions that theatre and performance are uniquely capable of asking: How does theatre function as a place for seeing and hearing? How do not only bodies and voices but also objects and media perform? How do memories, emotions and ideas continue to do their work when the performance is over? And how can theatre and performance intervene in social, political and environmental structures and frameworks? Written by leading international scholars, each chapter of this volume is built around a key performance example, and detailed discussions introduce the methodologies and theories that help us understand how these performances are practices of enquiry into the world. Thinking through Theatre and Performance is essential for those involved in making, enjoying, critiquing and studying theatre, and will appeal to anyone who is interested in the questions that theatre and performance ask of themselves and of us.

Blackening Europe

Her “professorship at Yale” was described as follows on the dust jacket of Journey to Accompong: “While Katherine Dunham was appearing in 'Cabin in the Sky' she spent a Sunday evening at the Yale University Graduate School, delivering a ...

Blackening Europe

Traditional Scholars have often looked at African American studies through the lens of European theories, resulting in the secondarization of the African American presence in Europe and its contributions to European culture. Blackening Europe reverses this pattern by using African American culture as the starting point for a discussion of its influences over traditional European structures. Evidence of Europe's blackening abound, form French ministers of Hip-hop and British incarnations of "Shaft" to slavery memorial in the Netherlands and German youth sporting dreadlocks. Collecting essays by scholars from both sides of the Atlantic and fields as diverse as history, literature, politics, social studies, art, film and music, Blackening Europe explores the implications of these cultural hybrids and extends the growing dialogues about Europe's fascination with African America.

Symbolism 16

In 2011, the Chief Abeng Blower of Accompong, Hansley Reid, explained the origins and other significance of the Abeng in ... Katherine Dunham and Ted Cook, Katherine Dunham's Journey to Accompong (New York: Henry Holt, ), .

Symbolism 16

Essays in this special focus constellate around the diverse symbolic forms in which Caribbean consciousness has manifested itself transhistorically, shaping identities within and without structures of colonialism and postcolonialism. Offering interdisciplinary critical, analytical and theoretical approaches to the objects of study, the book explores textual, visual, material and ritual meanings encoded in Caribbean lived and aesthetic practices.

Island People

The larger aspect and resonance of the venue for that speech, the Maroons' old capital of Accompong, suggested much about its contents. This village was described by the American choreographer Katherine Dunham in her 1946 book, Journey ...

Island People

Shortlisted for the Edward Stanford Travel Writing Awards Clustered together in azure-blue waters are a collection of little islands whose culture, history and people have touched every corner of the world. From the moment Columbus gazed out at what he mistook for India, and wrote in his journal of 'the most beautiful land that human eyes have ever seen,' the Caribbean has been the subject of fantasies, myths and daydreams. It was claimed, and its societies were built to enrich old Europe, and much later its beaches were splashed across billboards advertising fizzy drinks, its towns and people pictured in holiday brochures. But these islands are so much more than gloss, white sand and palm trees, they form a region rich in colour, beauty and strength. Home of the Rastafarian faith, Che Guevara's stomping ground and birthplace of reggae, the Caribbean has produced some of the world's most famous artists, activists, writers, musicians and sportsmen - from Usain Bolt to Bob Marley and from Harry Belafonte to V. S. Naipaul. In the pages of Island People we hear the voices of the Caribbean people, explore their home and learn what it means to them, and to the world. In this fascinating and absorbing book, the product of almost a decade of travel and intense study, Joshua Jelly-Schapiro strips away the fantasy and myth to expose the real islands, and the real people, that make up the Caribbean.

African American Pioneers in Anthropology

Fieldwork and Its Fruits Katherine Dunham's first field trip to the West Indies — especially her stay in Haiti ... This theme is especially pronounced in Journey to Accompong , her first field account available to the general public .

African American Pioneers in Anthropology

This pathbreaking collection of intellectual biographies is the first to probe the careers of thirteen early African-American anthropologists, detailing both their achievements and their struggle with the latent and sometimes blatant racism of the times. Invaluable to historians of anthropology, this collection will also be useful to readers interested in African-American studies and biography. The lives and work of: Caroline Bond Day, Zora Neale Hurston, Louis Eugene King, Laurence Foster, W. Montague Cobb, Katherine Dunham, Ellen Irene Diggs, Allison Davis, St. Clair Drake, Arthur Huff Fauset, William S. Willis Jr., Hubert Barnes Ross, Elliot Skinner