Journey to the Western Front

This is a classic gem of Great War literature. It is accompanied by a new introduction by Nigel Cave.

Journey to the Western Front

Journey to the Western Front was first published in 1936; Ralph Mottram served on the Western Front for most of the war, first with the Royal Norfolks and then as a liaison with the civilians in the forward zone of the BEF, mainly on the Franco-Belgian border.He conducted the groundwork for the book in late 1935 and early 1936, although he had been back to the old battlefields before. He covers much of the France and Flanders campaigning ground, using the imaginative method of dividing it into five areas, roughly based on those held by each of the five Armies of the BEF. It is fascinating to see today's Somme and Salient through the eyes of a gifted author and veteran of the campaign who was writing just as the great remembrance construction work of the Imperial War Graves Commission was coming to an end, whilst the landscape, villages and towns had been restored to some semblance of normality.Almost everything that Mottram describes, only a few years before the area was to be ravaged by another world war, is recognisable today. What he brings to this very personal guide is the educated eye of one who lived amongst the local population during the war years and yet was part of the massive undertaking that was the BEF. A literary man, the book is replete with acute observations, whilst the descriptions are always put into the context of the fighting men whom he knew and makes extensive use of the wealth of material - memoirs and histories - that was published in the years immediately after the war.This is a classic gem of Great War literature. It is accompanied by a new introduction by Nigel Cave.

The War Walk

The War Walk


A Journey to the Western Front

Its Western Front presents its incredible and tragic history. The travel and historical experience along the Western Front is highly rewarding--and "A Journey" provides the material with which to make your trips.

A Journey to the Western Front

History and Travel Guide to the First World War 700-kilometer Western Front. Travels are from Belgian Flanders (starting at Nieuwpoort on the North Sea) to the Artois and Picardy in northern France, over east to the Aisne-Marne, Champagne, and Lorraine, and finally south to the Alsace (by the Swiss border). Featured are fifty of the best Western Front sites to visit, along with excellent and analytical historical accounts. The history of the entire war unfolds as all chapters are read. The First World War is called the seminal event of the 20th century by many historians. Its Western Front presents its incredible and tragic history. The travel and historical experience along the Western Front is highly rewarding--and "A Journey" provides the material with which to make your trips.

Dark Journey Three key NZ battles of the western front

this significant volume will see the completion of over seven years' writing and research by esteemed military historian Glyn Harper. the book will include the revision and reissuing of his two earlier detailed histories of the New Zealand ...

Dark Journey  Three key NZ battles of the western front

this significant volume will see the completion of over seven years' writing and research by esteemed military historian Glyn Harper. the book will include the revision and reissuing of his two earlier detailed histories of the New Zealand Divisions' major Western Front battles of World War One: Massacre at Passchendaele (2000) Spring offensive (2003) combined with an unpublished account of the third major battle of the Somme, at Bapaume, during which several VCs were awarded to New Zealand troops. Dark Journey presents the first comprehensive overview of New Zealand's involvement in World War One by one of our most highly regarded historians. It also provides indepth analysis of the NZ war contribution, with startling revelations about the true scale of casualties, consistently under-reported in the past. this will be Glyn Harper's master work, bringing together research and resources from his previous books, presenting the full story of New Zealand's Western Front experiences on a deservedly grand scale.

Vasco Loureiro

Vasco Loureiro


The War Walk

THE WAR WALK describes his pilgrimage to the Western Front battlefields: it is a compelling blend of history, travel and personal anecdotes from some of the last surviving veterans of the First World War.

The War Walk

A tourist guide, a history and a personal story of the Western Front 1914-18 Nigel Jones's uncle was killed in action near Ypres in 1915, aged just eighteen, and his father served on Field Marshal Haig's staff: no wonder then, that he has always been fascinated by the First World War. THE WAR WALK describes his pilgrimage to the Western Front battlefields: it is a compelling blend of history, travel and personal anecdotes from some of the last surviving veterans of the First World War. He follows the old trench networks from the Belgian coast to the Swiss frontier, bringing each battlefield to life with vivid eyewitness testimony and investigating how the sites are preserved today for modern visitors.

Beyond the Western Front A Study of Siegfried Sassoon s Poetry

Sassoon‟s poetry from The Heart‟s Journey onwards marks a new direction in his poetic development. The terrestrial problems have lost significance to the poet. He has come to realize that the “spiritual” is “real”.1 The spirit of his ...

Beyond the Western Front  A Study of Siegfried Sassoon   s Poetry

Dr Dharmadas Banerjee‘s book Beyond the Western Front: A Study of Siegfried Sassoon’s Poetry is an attempt to look ‗beyond‘ the popular evaluation of Sassoon as a War Poet. By the writer‘s own admission he wants to capture Sassoon‘s versatile poetic genius to dispel this popular appraisal. A poet of rare merit Sassoon is also known for his romantic sensibilities. His love for the English countryside is evident in his autobiographical memoirs. His Diaries and letters are a potent source to know about the profound influence that the catastrophic First World War had on him. The author has also tried to focus on Sassoon‘s quest for ―the world undiscovered within us‖ which is discernible in the poems of the later phase of Sassoon‘s poetic career

The Western Front

Jones, N. (1983) The War Walk: A Journey Along the Western Front. London: Robert Hale Ltd. ICOM (International Council of Museums) (2007) ICOM Statues Article 3 – Definition of Terms. At: http://archives.icom.museum/hist_def_eng.html ...

The Western Front

The Western Front has become, once again, and after 100 years, an important and increasingly popular tourist destination. The Centenary is already encouraging large numbers of visitors to engage with this highly poignant landscape of war and to commemorate the sacrifice and loss of a previous generation. Interest is also being sharpened in the Ôplaces of warÕ as battle-sites, trench-systems, bunkers and mine craters gain a clearer identity as war heritage. For the first time this book brings together the three strands of heritage, landscape and tourism to provide a fresh understanding of the multi-layered nature of the Western Front. The book approaches the area as a rich dynamic landscape which can be viewed in a startling variety of ways: historically, materially, culturally, and perceptually. To illustrate these two dominant interpretations of the regionÕs landscape Ð commemorative and heritage Ð are highlighted and their relationship to tourism explored. Tourism is a lens through which these layers can be peeled away, and each understood and interacted with according to the individualÕs own knowledge, motivation, and degree of emotional engagement. Tourism is not regarded here as a passive phenomenon, but as an active agent that can determine, dictate and inscribe this evocative landscape. The Western Front: Heritage, Landscape and Tourism is a timely addition to our increasing interest in the First World War and the places where it was fought. It will be indispensable to those who seek a deeper understanding of the conflict from previously undervalued perspectives.

Long Journey for Civilization

本书讲述次世界大战期间,中国派出14万华工到西线为英,法军队服务,为协约国取得大战的胜利作出了重要贡献.主要内容:1.次世界大战与中国;2."以工代兵"战略的出笼和法国招工团;3 ...

Long Journey for Civilization


All Quiet on the Western Front Erich Maria Remarque

According to Paul, his journey of learning was practically completed in his “first bombardment.” In that moment, “the world as they [the older generation] taught it to us broke in pieces . . . we saw that there was nothing of their ...

All Quiet on the Western Front   Erich Maria Remarque

Remarque's 1929 novel is among the finest antiwar literature written after the First World War.

The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of Paris

concrete, and knowing, evocation of the geography, particularly in Voyage au bout de la nuit and the two volumes of ... 302) In other words, it is on the Place Clichy that Bardamu's journey from the Western Front, where he may have died ...

The Cambridge Companion to the Literature of Paris

A comprehensive exploration of Paris through the texts and experiences of a vast and vibrant range of authors.

Writing disenchantment

To negotiate the journey to the Western Front by mechanised transport and the mechanisation of men through training contrasts with the approach to Gallipoli by boat. The trenches lack a similar accretion of romance: 'In France there was ...

Writing disenchantment

It has become axiomatic that First World War literature was disenchanted, or disillusioned, and returning combatants were unable to process or communicate that experience. In Writing disenchantment, Andrew Frayn argues that this was not just about the war: non-combatants were just as disenchanted as those who fought, and writers such as D. H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf produced some of the sharpest criticisms. Its language already existed in contemporary sociological and historical accounts of the problems of mass culture and the modern city, whose structures contained the conflict and were strengthened during it. Archival material, sales data and reviews are used to chart disenchantment in a wide range of early twentieth-century war literature from novels about fears of invasion and pacifism, through the modernist novels of the 1920s to its dominance in the War Books Boom of 1928–30. This book will appeal to scholars and students of English literature, social and cultural history, and gender studies.

From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer

The papers had been full of tales of those who had made it rich and it was this that had prompted him to undertake the long and dangerous journey. However, the newspapers had not mentioned the thousands who had trekked there in vain or ...

From Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer

Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris was an adventurer, a man possessed of great courage and charm, who fulfilled every schoolboy fantasy and really did 'live the dream'. ??The second youngest of seven children, the ordinary life held little appeal for Sydney so, in 1898, at the age of 17, he left home in Ilford for the Klondike gold rush. Arriving too late to make his fortune he decided to join the US Army.??Two and a half years later, after seeing action in the Boxer Rebellion and the Philippines Insurrection, Sydney returned to England where he met and married Elsa de Verde Verder, a lady from an affluent Vermont family. A year later Sydney joined the Kings Colonials Imperial Yeomanry, later renamed the King Edward's Horse. ??Still seeking excitement, in August 1914 he transferred to the Royal Flying Corps and in 1916 went to France with 23 Squadron to fly the FE2b. Life expectancy for pilots on the front lines was very short and he was badly wounded while gun-spotting over enemy lines. After several months recovering he was posted to Turnberry as Chief Instructor and on the 13th August 1917, he was posted to Marske (by-the-Sea), with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, to form and command No.2 Fighting School. In 1919 he was awarded the Air Force Cross.??But war was not quite finished with Sydney. In 1936, fleeing imminent bankruptcy, he became involved with the International Brigades in the Spanish Civil War. Returning back to England he joined the RAFVR (Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve) and when the Second World War broke out he was posted to Turnhouse as Section Controller. This really didn't suit him and, determined to see more action, at the age of 58, he arranged a transfer to France as Adjutant with No 1 Squadron where his duties included liaising with the French Air Force. He later transferred to 1 ATS near Perpignan and was one of the last to leave France with the German Blitzkrieg only a few hours away. Despite his ill health he continued to serve throughout the war and in 1947 became Commander at Marchwood Park where the members of the 'Guinea Pig' club went to recover.??A remarkable life led in an era of endless possibilities.??Royalties from this book will go to Help 4 Homeless Veterans who support Servicemen and women into suitable accommodation, and empower them to develop a civilian career through their links with employers and other organisations.

Reporting the First World War in the Liminal Zone

This book deals with an aspect of the Great War that has been largely overlooked: the war reportage written based on British and American authors’ experiences at the Western Front.

Reporting the First World War in the Liminal Zone

This book deals with an aspect of the Great War that has been largely overlooked: the war reportage written based on British and American authors’ experiences at the Western Front. It focuses on how the liminal experience of the First World War was portrayed in a series of works of literary journalism at different stages of the conflict, from the summer of 1914 to the Armistice in November 1918. Sara Prieto explores a number of representative texts written by a series of civilian eyewitness who have been passed over in earlier studies of literature and journalism in the Great War. The texts under discussion are situated in the ‘liminal zone’, as they were written in the middle of a transitional period, half-way between two radically different literary styles: the romantic and idealising ante bellum tradition, and the cynical and disillusioned modernist school of writing. They are also the product of the various stages of a physical and moral journey which took several authors into the fantastic albeit nightmarish world of the Western Front, where their understanding of reality was transformed beyond anything they could have anticipated.

Landscapes of the Western Front

The journey to the front was also met with enthusiasm for new recruits and older hands as it ensured an end to the tedium ofthe drills, exercises or labouring, during rest periods behind the lines. This excitement was reinforced as the ...

Landscapes of the Western Front

This book examines the British soldiers on the Western Front and how they responded to the war landscape they encountered behind the lines and at the front. Using a multidisciplinary perspective, this study investigates the relationship between soldiers and the spaces and materials of the warzone, analyzing how soldiers constructed a ‘sense of place’ in the hostile, unpredictable environment. Drawing upon recent developments within First World War Studies and the anthropological examination of the fields of conflict, an ethnohistorical perspective of the soldiers is built which details the various ways soldiers responded to the physical and material world of the Western Front. This study is also grounded in the wider debates on how the First World War is remembered within Britain and offers an alternative perspective on the individuals who fought in the world’s first global conflagration nearly a century ago.

Recharting the Thirties

the Menin Gate ( 1932 ) , and Journey to the Western Front Twenty Years After ( 1936 ) . These war - related works of the 1930s — vital documents from a decade marked , in England , by frenetic cultural mythification of the Great War ...

Recharting the Thirties

The aim of Recharting the Thirties is to revitalize the awareness of the reading public with regard to eighteen writers whose books have been largely ignored by publishers and scholars since their major works first appeared in the thirties. The selection is not based on a political agenda, but encompasses a wide and divergent range of philosophies; clearly, the contrasts between Empson and Upward, or between Powell and Slater, indicated the wide-ranging vision of the period. Women writers of the period have largely been marginalized, and the writings of Sackville-West and Burdekin, for example, not only present distinct feminine voices of the period, but also illuminate how much good literature has been forgotten.

Photographing the Fallen

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Acknowledgements -- Prologue -- Glossary of Abbreviations -- Chapter 1 Journey to the Western Front -- Chapter 2 The Graves Registration Unit -- Chapter 3 Digs and Darkrooms -- Chapter 4 Shellfi re ...

Photographing the Fallen

Ivan Bawtree has left behind a vast array of archives that tell the story of his work as a photographer with the Graves Registration Units on the Western Front from 1915 to 1919. He traveled to numerous parts of Northern France and Flanders most notably the Ypres Salient to photograph and record graves of fallen soldiers on behalf of grieving relatives. He was one of only three professional photographers assigned to this task, hired by the newly formed Graves Registration Commission in 1915. Through his pencil and lens we gain detailed insight not just into the work he did and the men he worked with, but also aspects of the military zones, the perils of proximity to the Front Line, the devastation of war, and the birth and early work of the Imperial War Graves Commission. Today, the war cemeteries that Ivan saw spring up across battle-scarred landscapes and provide the most widespread and enduring reminder of the scale of loss and sacrifice of the Great War.