Judge Lynch

About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work.

Judge Lynch

Excerpt from Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years Lynching has many legal definitions: It means one thing in Kentucky and North Carolina and another in Virginia or Minnesota. For the purpose of this work it is defined as the execution without process of the law, by a mob, of any individual suspected or convicted of a crime or accused of an offense against the prevailing social customs. The state of Minnesota clearly defines it as the killing of a human being by the act or procurement of a mob. In Kentucky and North Carolina the lynch-victim must have been in the hands of the law or there was no lynching. Virginia defines it simply as murder and ordains that every person composing the mob, upon conviction, shall be punished by death. There is more than the simple dictionary definition of lynching. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Judge Lynch His First Hundred Years

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Judge Lynch  His First Hundred Years

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Judge lynch

Judge lynch


Judge Lynch His First 100 Years

For the purpose of this work it is defined as the execution without process of the law, by a mob, of any individual suspected or convicted of a crime or accused of an offense against the prevailing social customs.

Judge Lynch  His First 100 Years

"TO HELL WITH THE LAW" LYNCHING has many legal definitions. It means one thing in Kentucky and North Carolina and another in Virginia or Minnesota. For the purpose of this work it is defined as the execution without process of the law, by a mob, of any individual suspected or convicted of a crime or accused of an offense against the prevailing social customs. The state of Minnesota clearly defines it as the killing of a human being by the act or procurement of a mob. In Kentucky and North Carolina the lynch-victim must have been in the hands of the law or there was no lynching. Virginia defines it simply as murder and ordains that every person composing the mob, upon conviction, shall be punished by death. There is more than the simple dictionary definition of lynching. Behind every lynching, beyond the destruction of the unfortunate victim, is the debasement of citizenship, the crucifixion of justice and democratic government, the prostitution of public officials, and the depraved behavior of the mob-members. FRANK SHAY, 1938

Lynching

Jesse Carr, “The Lawlessness of Law: Lynching and Anti-lynching in the Contemporary USA,” Settler Colonial Studies 6, ... Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Biblo and Tannen, 1969), 18–22; James Elbert Cutler, ...

Lynching

While victims of antebellum lynchings were typically white men, postbellum lynchings became more frequent and more intense, with the victims more often black. After Reconstruction, lynchings exhibited and embodied links between violent collective action, American civic identity, and the making of the nation. Ersula J. Ore investigates lynching as a racialized practice of civic engagement, in effect an argument against black inclusion within the changing nation. Ore scrutinizes the civic roots of lynching, the relationship between lynching and white constitutionalism, and contemporary manifestations of lynching discourse and logic today. From the 1880s onward, lynchings, she finds, manifested a violent form of symbolic action that called a national public into existence, denoted citizenship, and upheld political community. Grounded in Ida B. Wells’s summation of lynching as a social contract among whites to maintain a racial order, at its core, Ore’s book speaks to racialized violence as a mode of civic engagement. Since violence enacts an argument about citizenship, Ore construes lynching and its expressions as part and parcel of America’s rhetorical tradition and political legacy. Drawing upon newspapers, official records, and memoirs, as well as critical race theory, Ore outlines the connections between what was said and written, the material practices of lynching in the past, and the forms these rhetorics and practices assume now. In doing so, she demonstrates how lynching functioned as a strategy interwoven with the formation of America’s national identity and with the nation’s need to continually restrict and redefine that identity. In addition, Ore ties black resistance to lynching, the acclaimed exhibit Without Sanctuary, recent police brutality, effigies of Barack Obama, and the killing of Trayvon Martin.

Outrage in Ohio

Violence, 309–310, 315; Christopher Waldrep, The Many Faces of Judge Lynch: Extralegal Violence and Punishment in America (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002), 97; Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Ives ...

Outrage in Ohio

On a hot and dusty Sunday in June 1872, 13-year-old Mary Secaur set off on her two-mile walk home from church. She never arrived. The horrific death of this young girl inspired an illegal interstate pursuit-and-arrest, courtroom dramatics, conflicting confessions, and the daylight lynching of a traveling tin peddler and an intellectually disabled teenager. Who killed Mary Secaur? Were the accused actually guilty? What drove the citizens of Mercer County to lynch the suspects? David Kimmel seeks answers to these provoking questions and deftly recounts what actually happened in the fateful summer of 1872, imagining the inner workings of the small rural community, reconstructing the personal relationships of those involved, and restoring humanity to this gripping story. Using a unique blend of historical research and contemporary accounts, Outrage in Ohio explores how a terrible crime ripped an Ohio farming community apart and asks us to question what really happened to Mary Secaur.

American Lynching

William Lloyd Garrison suggested in 1856 that over three hundred white men had been lynched in the past twenty years; quoted in Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Ives Washburn, 1938), p. 63.

American Lynching

A history of lynching in America over the course of three centuries, from colonial Virginia to twentieth-century Texas. After observing the varying reactions to the 1998 death of James Byrd Jr. in Texas, called a lynching by some, denied by others, Ashraf Rushdy determined that to comprehend this event he needed to understand the long history of lynching in the United States. In this meticulously researched and accessibly written interpretive history, Rushdy shows how lynching in America has endured, evolved, and changed in meaning over the course of three centuries, from its origins in early Virginia to the present day. “A work of uncommon breadth, written with equally uncommon concision. Excellent.” —N. D. B. Connolly, Johns Hopkins University “Provocative but careful, opinionated but persuasive . . . Beyond synthesizing current scholarship, he offers a cogent discussion of the evolving definition of lynching, the place of lynchers in civil society, and the slow-in-coming end of lynching. This book should be the point of entry for anyone interested in the tragic and sordid history of American lynching.” —W. Fitzhugh Brundage, author of Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930 “A sophisticated and thought-provoking examination of the historical relationship between the American culture of lynching and the nation’s political traditions. This engaging and wide-ranging meditation on the connection between democracy, lynching, freedom, and slavery will be of interest to those in and outside of the academy.” —William Carrigan, Rowan University “In this sobering account, Rushdy makes clear that the cultural values that authorize racial violence are woven into the very essence of what it means to be American. This book helps us make sense of our past as well as our present.” —Jonathan Holloway, Yale University

Chicago Police Problems

Shay: Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years 56. Barnes: The Repression of Crime 57. Cable: The Silent South 58. Kammerer: The Unmarried Mother 59- Doshay: The Boy Sex Offender and His Later Career 60. Spaulding: An Experimental Study of ...

Chicago Police Problems


Liberalizing Lynching

Justice: The Lynching of Mack Charles Parker (New York: Oxford University Press, 1986); and George C. Wright, ... The Tragedy of Lynching (Chapel Hill: Arno Press, 1969); Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Ives ...

Liberalizing Lynching

This study explores the relationship between the American liberal regime and the illiberal act of lynching. It explores the federal government's pattern of non-intervention regarding the lynchings of African Americans from the late 19th century to the 1960s. Although popular belief holds that the federal government was unable to address racial violence in the South, Kato argues that its actions and decisions show that federal inaction was not primarily a consequence of institutional or legal incapacities, but rather a decision supported and maintained by all three branches of the federal government.

Lynchings

... Lynch—LauxAn Investigation into the History of Lynching in the United States (New York, 1905); Walter White, Rope and Faggot: A Biography ry'j'udge Lynch (New York, 1929); and Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New ...

Lynchings

Lynchings: Extralegal Violence in Florida during the 1930sThis study examines the 13 lynchings that occurred in the southern state of Florida during the decade of the 1930s. It provides a lively and detailed narrative account of each lynching and concludes that there is no one single theory or explanation of these extralegal executions. The author does, however, reveal several patterns common to these separate acts of vigilantism. For example, most Florida lynchings were not rural, small-town ceremonial hangings of black males accused of sexual offenses. Rather, the majority of lynch victims were forcibly seized from police and shot by small bands of carefully organized vigilantes rather than frenzied mobs. Moreover, one third of these lynchings occurred in urban areas. The study finishes with a brief overview of the three Florida lynchings of the 1940s and the sudden end of this southern lynch law in modern America.

Rough Justice

Rabinowitz , Howard N. Race Relations in the Urban South , 1865–1890 . ... Rosenberg , Charles E. The Trial of the Assassin Guiteau : Psychiatry and Law in the Gilded Age . ... Judge Lynch : His First Hundred Years .

Rough Justice

Investigates the pervasive and persistent commitment to "rough justice" that characterized rural and working class areas of most of the United States in the late nineteenth century. This work examines the influence of race, gender, and class on understandings of criminal justice and shows how they varied across regions.

Lethal Punishment

One source reported that nearly one hundred mob members spent the time waiting for Lowry's arrival in the lobby of the Peabody, Memphis's premier hotel. Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years ...

Lethal Punishment

Why did some offenses in the South end in mob lynchings while similar crimes led to legal executions? Why did still other cases have nonlethal outcomes? In this well-researched and timely book, Margaret Vandiver explores the complex relationship between these two forms of lethal punishment, challenging the assumption that executions consistently grew out of-and replaced-lynchings. Vandiver begins by examining the incidence of these practices in three culturally and geographically distinct southern regions. In rural northwest Tennessee, lynchings outnumbered legal executions by eleven to one and many African Americans were lynched for racial caste offenses rather than for actual crimes. In contrast, in Shelby County, which included the growing city of Memphis, more men were legally executed than lynched. Marion County, Florida, demonstrated a firmly entrenched tradition of lynching for sexual assault that ended in the early 1930s with three legal death sentences in quick succession. With a critical eye to issues of location, circumstance, history, and race, Vandiver considers the ways that legal and extralegal processes imitated, influenced, and differed from each other. A series of case studies demonstrates a parallel between mock trials that were held by lynch mobs and legal trials that were rushed through the courts and followed by quick executions. Tying her research to contemporary debates over the death penalty, Vandiver argues that modern death sentences, like lynchings of the past, continue to be influenced by factors of race and place, and sentencing is comparably erratic.

Jury Nullification

On the one hand, a stronger a priori case can be made that juries would nullify in lynch- ing cases than in the civil rights murders; ... NAACP, supra note 26, 25-26; Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years, 131-132 (1938). 30.

Jury Nullification

The Founding Fathers guaranteed trial by jury three times in the Constitution—more than any other right—since juries can serve as the final check on government’s power to enforce unjust, immoral, or oppressive laws. But in America today, how independent c

Lynchings in Kansas 1850s 1932

In her article, Yost cites neither Frank Shay's Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (1900) nor James Elbert Cutler's Lynch-Law: An Investigation into the History of Lynching in the United States (1905).

Lynchings in Kansas  1850s  1932

In 1933, Genevieve Yost, Kansas State Historical Society cataloger, published a "History of Lynching in Kansas." The present book is a development of that work, researched with the benefit of modern technology. The author locates 58 lynchings Yost missed and removes 19 from her list that for various reasons are not lynchings in Kansas. Yost apparently catalogued her 123 entries, some containing up to six names, based on her newspaper sources' headlines, not the actual stories on the lynchings. Her catalog places some events in counties that did not exist at the time of the lynching. In this book, errors in her data are corrected: misspelled names, incorrect places and dates, and the number of victims per incident. In agreement with Yost, the author finds that most of the victims were white men who were horse thieves, their deaths taking place in the eastern tier of counties bordering Missouri, an area then and now where most Kansans lived. The last lynching in Kansas took place in 1932 in the extreme northwest of the state, and an interview of an eyewitness is included.

Lynchings in Mississippi

57. Frank Shay, Judge Lynch, His First Hundred Years, ¡05; Ginzburg, ¡00 Years of Lynchings, 227; Clarion-Ledger, June 23, ¡935. 58. Shay, Judge Lynch, 248; Newsweek, April 24, ¡937, ¡2. On April ¡3, ¡937, a reporter from Jackson, ...

Lynchings in Mississippi

Lynching occurred more in Mississippi than in any other state. During the 100 years after the Civil War, almost one in every ten lynchings in the United States took place in Mississippi. As in other Southern states, these brutal murders were carried out primarily by white mobs against black victims. The complicity of communities and courts ensured that few of the more than 500 lynchings in Mississippi resulted in criminal convictions. This book studies lynching in Mississippi from the Civil War through the civil rights movement. It examines how the crime unfolded in the state and assesses the large number of deaths, the reasons, the distribution by counties, cities and rural locations, and public responses to these crimes. The final chapter covers lynching’s legacy in the decades since 1965; an appendix offers a chronology.

Lynching in America

... Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Ives Washburn, 1938), 103–105. 10. Richard L. McCormick, “The Discovery That Business Corrupts Politics: A Reappraisal of the Origins of Progressivism,” American Historical ...

Lynching in America

"Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order."--Publisher description.

Lynching Reconsidered

White ViolenceandBlack Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery. Amherst: Universityof Massachusetts Press, 1988. Shay, Frank. Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years. New York: Ives Washburn, Inc.,1938. Smith, Dan W. Jr.'JamesO.

Lynching Reconsidered

The history of lynching and mob violence has become a subject of considerable scholarly and public interest in recent years. Popular works by James Allen, Philip Dray, and Leon Litwack have stimulated new interest in the subject. A generation of new scholars, sparked by these works and earlier monographs, are in the process of both enriching and challenging the traditional narrative of lynching in the United States. This volume contains essays by ten scholars at the forefront of the movement to broaden and deepen our understanding of mob violence in the United States. These essays range from the Reconstruction to World War Two, analyze lynching in multiple regions of the United States, and employ a wide range of methodological approaches. The authors explore neglected topics such as: lynching in the Mid-Atlantic, lynching in Wisconsin, lynching photography, mob violence against southern white women, black lynch mobs, grassroots resistance to racial violence by African Americans, nineteenth century white southerners who opposed lynching, and the creation of 'lynching narratives' by southern white newspapers. This book was first published as a special issue of American Nineteenth Century History

Communicative Engagement and Social Liberation

Crites, “A History of the Association of Southern Women for Prevention of Lynching,” 91. ... York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2002); Frank Shay, Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years (New York: Biblo and Tannen Booksellers and Publishers, Inc., ...

Communicative Engagement and Social Liberation

This work addresses limitations in current approaches to rhetorical historiography and provides fresh philosophical ground that responds to these limitations. By integrating philosophical ideas, a philosophy of communicative engagement is formed and illustrated with descriptions of three women’s successful efforts to change the face of society.

The Social Gospel in Black and White

have provided a subscription base that the Basis never achieved. But the odds were heavily against any ... Judge Lynch. His First Hundred Years (New York: I. Washhurn. 1938), 2. "The Outlook," Christian Union 43 (19 March 1891): 363.

The Social Gospel in Black and White

In a major revision of accepted wisdom, this book, originally published by UNC Press in 1991, demonstrates that American social Christianity played an important role in racial reform during the period between Emancipation and the civil rights movement. As organizations created by the heirs of antislavery sentiment foundered in the mid-1890s, Ralph Luker argues, a new generation of black and white reformers--many of them representatives of American social Christianity--explored a variety of solutions to the problem of racial conflict. Some of them helped to organize the Federal Council of Churches in 1909, while others returned to abolitionist and home missionary strategies in organizing the NAACP in 1910 and the National Urban League in 1911. A half century later, such organizations formed the institutional core of America's civil rights movement. Luker also shows that the black prophets of social Christianity who espoused theological personalism created an influential tradition that eventually produced Martin Luther King Jr.