The Kabul Beauty School

In the tradition of Reading Lolita in Tehran, woven through the book are stories of the students, for example, the 12-year-old bride who has been sold into marriage to pay off her family's debts, the medic who had not left her house for 30 ...

The Kabul Beauty School

Deborah Rodriguez arrived in Afghanistan in 2002 with nothing but a desire to help and a beauty degree. When she arrived she learned that the once-proud tradition of Afghan beauty salons had been all but destroyed by the Taliban. With her knowledge of both beauty and enterprise, Rodriguez helped found the Kabul Beauty School and opened a modern salon in Kabul. She trained local women to become beauticians - one of the few ways in which a woman could support herself and her family. And it is here that she not only empowered her students with a new sense of autonomy - in this strictly patriarchal culture the beauty school proved a small haven - but also made some of the closest friends of her life. In the tradition of Reading Lolita in Tehran, woven through the book are stories of the students, for example, the 12-year-old bride who has been sold into marriage to pay off her family's debts, the medic who had not left her house for 30 years, the newlywed who must fake her own virginity... All of these women have a story to tell, and all of them bring their stories to the Kabul Beauty School, where, along with Rodriguez herself, they learn the art of perms, friendship and freedom.

The Kabul Beauty School

And NAHIDA, the prize pupil who bears the scars of her Taliban husband's approval. In the Kabul Beauty School, these women and many others find a safe haven and the seeds of their future independence.

The Kabul Beauty School

In a little beauty school in the war zone of Kabul, a community of women comes together, all with stories to tell. DEBBIE, the American hairdresser who co-founds the training salon. As the burqas are removed in class, curls are coiffed and make-up is applied, Debbie's students share with her their stories - and their hearts. MINA, forcibly married to a man in repayment of a family debt and threatened with having her child taken away. ROSHANNA, a tearful young bride terrified her in-laws will discover she's not a virgin. And NAHIDA, the prize pupil who bears the scars of her Taliban husband's approval. In the Kabul Beauty School, these women and many others find a safe haven and the seeds of their future independence. From the bestselling author of THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP OF KABUL, this is an eye-opening, inspiring and enthralling story.

Kabul Beauty School

Debbie hanyalah seorang ahli kecantikan.

Kabul Beauty School

Debbie hanyalah seorang ahli kecantikan. Apa yang bisa ia lakukan saat harus diterjunkan ke Afganistan bersama serombongan pekerja sosial? Tanpa diduga, keahliannya sangat bermanfaat bagi para perempuan Afgan yang selama ini tersembunyi di balk Burqa. Tergugah oleh kenyataan di lapangan, Debbie mendirikan sekolah kecantikan Kabul. Tentu saja tidak mudah mengajarkan semua materi kecantikan. Ada perbedaan budaya, dan bahasa terutama. Mampukan Debbie mengatasinya? Sebuah cerita kocak tentang arti persahabatan dan cinta lintas budaya. [Bentang, Novel, Komedi, Indonesia]

The Kabul Beauty School

In the tradition of Reading Lolita in Tehran, woven through the book are stories of the students, for example, the 12-year-old bride who has been sold into marriage to pay off her family's debts, the medic who had not left her house for 30 ...

The Kabul Beauty School

Deborah Rodriguez arrived in Afghanistan in 2002 with nothing but a desire to help and a beauty degree. When she arrived she learned that the once-proud tradition of Afghan beauty salons had been all but destroyed by the Taliban. With her knowledge of both beauty and enterprise, Rodriguez helped found the Kabul Beauty School and opened a modern salon in Kabul. She trained local women to become beauticians - one of the few ways in which a woman could support herself and her family. And it is here that she not only empowered her students with a new sense of autonomy - in this strictly patriarchal culture the beauty school proved a small haven - but also made some of the closest friends of her life. In the tradition of Reading Lolita in Tehran, woven through the book are stories of the students, for example, the 12-year-old bride who has been sold into marriage to pay off her family's debts, the medic who had not left her house for 30 years, the newlywed who must fake her own virginity... All of these women have a story to tell, and all of them bring their stories to the Kabul Beauty School, where, along with Rodriguez herself, they learn the art of perms, friendship and freedom.

Kabul Beauty School

Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a humanitarian aid group.

Kabul Beauty School

Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a humanitarian aid group. Surrounded by people whose skills--as doctors, nurses, and therapists--seemed eminently more practical than her own, Rodriguez, a haird

The Kabul Beauty School

Deborah Rodriguez is one of the very few who lives smack in the middle of the urban insanity that is Kabul. In THE KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL, Debbie tells the story of the beauty school she founded and the vibrant women who study and work there.

The Kabul Beauty School

- PUBLISHER'S PROMISE - Most Westerners now working in Afghanistan spend their time tucked inside a military compound or embassy. Deborah Rodriguez is one of the very few who lives smack in the middle of the urban insanity that is Kabul. In THE KABUL BEAUTY SCHOOL, Debbie tells the story of the beauty school she founded and the vibrant women who study and work there. Debbie went to Afghanistan with nothing but a desire to help and her skills as a beautician. When she arrived, she learned that the once-proud tradition of Afghan beauty salons had been nearly destroyed by the Taliban. With her knowledge of beauty and enterprise, she opened the first salon in Kabul that actually trained local women to become beauticians - one of the few ways a woman can support herself and her family. And it is there that she made some of the closest friends of her life. The Kabul Beauty School provides a joyful haven for Debbie and the other women. All these women have a story to tell, and all of them bring their stories to THE

The Kabul Beauty School

... Rodriguez spent five years teaching at and later directing the Kabul Beauty School, the first modern beauty academy and training salon in Afghanistan.

The Kabul Beauty School

In a little beauty school in the war zone of Kabul, a community of women comes together, all with stories to tell. DEBBIE, the American hairdresser who co-founds the training salon. As the burqas are removed in class, curls are coiffed and make-up is applied, Debbie's students share with her their stories - and their hearts. MINA, forcibly married to a man in repayment of a family debt and threatened with having her child taken away. ROSHANNA, a tearful young bride terrified her in-laws will discover she's not a virgin. And NAHIDA, the prize pupil who bears the scars of her Taliban husband's approval. In the Kabul Beauty School, these women and many others find a safe haven and the seeds of their future independence. From the bestselling author of THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP OF KABUL, this is an eye-opening, inspiring and enthralling story.

The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul

THE INTERNATIONALLY BESTSELLING NOVEL 'If you love The Kite Runner you'll love The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul' LOOK MAGAZINE In a little coffee shop in one of the most dangerous places on earth, five very different women come together .

The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul

In a little coffee shop in one of the most dangerous places on earth, five very different women come together. SUNNY, the proud proprietor, who needs an ingenious plan - and fast - to keep her café and customers safe. YAZMINA, a young pregnant woman stolen from her remote village and now abandoned on Kabul's violent streets. CANDACE, a wealthy American who has finally left her husband for her Afghan lover, the enigmatic Wakil. ISABEL, a determined journalist with a secret that might keep her from the biggest story of her life. And HALAJAN, the sixty-year-old den mother, whose long-hidden love affair breaks all the rules. As these five women discover there's more to one another than meets the eye, they form a unique bond that will for ever change their lives and the lives of many others. The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul is the heart-warming and life-affirming fiction debut from the author of the bestselling memoir The Kabul Beauty School.

Margarita Wednesdays

"Irreverent, insightful, and blatantly honest, Deborah takes us along on her inspiring journey of self-discovery and renewal after she is forced to flee Afghanistan in 2007.

Margarita Wednesdays

"After being advised to commune with glowworms and sit in contemplation for one year, [hairdresser and motivational speaker] Rodriguez finally packs her life and her cat into her Mini Cooper and moves to a seaside town in Mexico. Despite having no plan, no friends, and no Spanish, a determined Rodriguez soon finds herself swept up in a world where the music never stops and a new life can begin. Her adventures and misadventures among the expats and locals help lead the way to new love, new family, and a new sense of herself"--Amazon.com.

House on Carnaval Street The

Intimate, honest and touching, this is the story of Deborah Rodriguez's often hilarious journey of self-discovery.

House on Carnaval Street  The

From Kabul to a home by the Mexican sea ... A life-affirming, sea-change memoir by the author of the international bestseller The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul. 'I hadn't been planning on making Mexico my new home, but the little house on the sea was all that I had lefta' When her family faces kidnap threats after the publication of her first book, Deborah Rodriguez is forced to flee Kabul, leaving behind her friends, her possessions, the beauty school she helped found and her two beloved businesses- a beauty salon and a coffee shop. But life proves no easier 'back home'. After a year living on top of a mountain in the Napa Valley and teetering on the edge of sanity, Deborah makes a decision. One way or another she's going to get the old Deb back. So, at the age of forty-nine, she packs her life and her cat Polly into her Mini Cooper and heads south to a pretty seaside town in Mexico. Home is now an unassuming little house on Carnaval Street. There she struggles to learn Spanish, works out with strippers and spends her Sunday nights watching clowns. And maybe - just maybe - the magic of Mexico will finally give her what she's always dreamed of- a life on her own terms . . .

The Zanzibar Wife

The Zanzibar Wife is a bewitching story of clashing cultures and conflicting beliefs, of secrets and revelations, of mystery and magic, by the author of the beloved international bestseller The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul.

The Zanzibar Wife

'A lovely novel of female friendship and support when East meets West, of magic and things we may not understand, of hope, of comfort, and in the background the enticing salty, fishy, spicy aromas of Zanzibar.' - Dinah Jeffries 'Heart-warming and poignant. A story of female courage and friendship sprinkled with magic - what's not to love?' - Rosanna Ley 'a compelling account of three very different women, each challenged by circumstances that reveal the inner conflict in their lives, and their refusal to conform. An endearing read.' - Vaseem Khan A beautiful, exotic, sweeping, emotional story, perfect for fans of The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul An internationally best selling author **************** Oman. The ancient land of frankincense, wind-swept deserts, craggy mountaintops and turquoise seas. Into this magical nation come three remarkable women, each facing a crossroad in her life. Rachel, an American war photographer, who is struggling to shed the trauma of her career. Now she is headed to Oman to cover quite a different story - for a glossy travel magazine. Ariana Khan, a bubbly English woman who has rashly volunteered as Rachel's 'fixer', a job she's never heard of in a country she knows nothing about. And Miza, a young woman living far from her beloved homeland of Zanzibar. As the second wife of Tariq, she remains a secret from his terrifying 'other' wife, Maryam. Until the day that Tariq fails to come home... As the three women journey together across this extraordinary land, they quickly learn that, in Oman, things aren't always what they appear to be... The Zanzibar Wife is a bewitching story of clashing cultures and conflicting beliefs, of secrets and revelations, of mystery and magic, by the author of the beloved international bestseller The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul. 'As if Maeve Binchy had written 'The Kite Runner' - Kirkus Reviews

The Carpetbaggers of Kabul and Other American Afghan Entanglements

of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Support for Afghanistan (parsa), first conceptualized the idea of creating a beauty school in Kabul after the fall of ...

The Carpetbaggers of Kabul and Other American Afghan Entanglements

The 2001 invasion of Afghanistan by United States and coalition forces was followed by a flood of aid and development dollars and “experts” representing well over two thousand organizations—each with separate policy initiatives, geopolitical agendas, and socioeconomic interests. This book examines the everyday actions of people associated with this international effort, with a special emphasis on small players: individuals and groups who charted alternative paths outside the existing networks of aid and development. This focus highlights the complexities, complications, and contradictions at the intersection of the everyday and the geopolitical, showing how dominant geopolitical narratives influence daily life in places like Afghanistan—and what happens when the goals of aid workersor the needs of aid recipients do not fit the narrative. Specifically, this book examines the use of gender, “need,” and grief as drivers for both common and exceptional responses to geopolitical interventions.Throughout this work, Jennifer L. Fluri and Rachel Lehr describe intimate encounters at a microscale to complicate and dispute the ways in which Afghans and their country have been imagined, described, fetishized, politicized, vilified, and rescued. The authors identify the ways in which Afghan men and women have been narrowly categorized as perpetrators and victims, respectively. They discuss several projects to show how gender and grief became forms of currency that were exchanged for different social, economic, and political opportunities. Such entanglements suggest the power and influence of the United States while illustrating the ways in which individuals and groups have attempted to chart alternative avenues of interaction, intervention, and interpretation.

A Cup of Friendship

From the author of the “bighearted . . . inspiring” (Vogue) memoir Kabul Beauty School comes a fiction debut as compelling as real life: the story of a remarkable coffee shop in the heart of Afghanistan, and the men and women who meet ...

A Cup of Friendship

From the author of the “bighearted . . . inspiring” (Vogue) memoir Kabul Beauty School comes a fiction debut as compelling as real life: the story of a remarkable coffee shop in the heart of Afghanistan, and the men and women who meet there—thrown together by circumstance, bonded by secrets, and united in an extraordinary friendship. After hard luck and some bad choices, Sunny has finally found a place to call home—it just happens to be in the middle of a war zone. The thirty-eight-year-old American’s pride and joy is the Kabul Coffee House, where she brings hospitality to the expatriates, misfits, missionaries, and mercenaries who stroll through its doors. She’s especially grateful that the busy days allow her to forget Tommy, the love of her life, who left her in pursuit of money and adventure. Working alongside Sunny is the maternal Halajan, who vividly recalls the days before the Taliban and now must hide a modern romance from her ultratraditional son—who, unbeknownst to her, is facing his own religious doubts. Into the café come Isabel, a British journalist on the trail of a risky story; Jack, who left his family back home in Michigan to earn “danger pay” as a consultant; and Candace, a wealthy and well-connected American whose desire to help threatens to cloud her judgment. When Yazmina, a young Afghan from a remote village, is kidnapped and left on a city street pregnant and alone, Sunny welcomes her into the café and gives her a home—but Yazmina hides a secret that could put all their lives in jeopardy. As this group of men and women discover that there’s more to one another than meets the eye, they’ll form an unlikely friendship that will change not only their own lives but the lives of an entire country. Brimming with Deborah Rodriguez’s remarkable gift for depicting the nuances of life in Kabul, and filled with vibrant characters that readers will truly care about, A Cup of Friendship is the best kind of fiction—full of heart yet smart and thought-provoking. From the Hardcover edition.

The Moroccan Daughter

The BRAND NEW novel from the internationally bestselling author of THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP OF KABUL In Morocco, behind the ancient walls of the medina, secrets will be revealed .

The Moroccan Daughter

The BRAND NEW novel from the internationally bestselling author of THE LITTLE COFFEE SHOP OF KABUL In Morocco, behind the ancient walls of the medina, secrets will be revealed . . . Amina Bennis has come back to her childhood home in Morocco to attend her sister's wedding. The time has come for her to confront her strict, traditionalist father with the secret she has kept for more than a year - her American husband Max. Amina's best friend Charlie, and Charlie's feisty grandmother Bea, have come along for moral support, staying with Amina and her family in their palatial riad in Fès, and enjoying all that the city has to offer. But Charlie is also hiding someone from her past - a mystery man from Casablanca. And then there's Samira, the Bennis's devoted housekeeper for many decades. Hers is the biggest secret of all - and the one that strikes at the very heart of the family . . . From the twisted alleyways of the ancient medina of Fès to a marriage festival high in the Atlas Mountains, Deborah Rodriguez's entrancing new bestseller is a modern story of forbidden love set in the sensual landscape of North Africa. PRAISE FOR DEBORAH RODRIGUEZ: 'Deborah Rodriguez is brilliant at transporting her readers to far-flung destinations' Sunday Express 'A brilliant story or strength and appreciation of difference that restores belief in humanity' Daily Telegraph 'An eye-opening and uplifting tale about sisterhood and survival' Grazia 'A heart-warming tale about female friendships' Cosmopolitan

Island on the Edge of the World

Haiti. A poor country rich in courage, strength and love.

Island on the Edge of the World

Haiti. A poor country rich in courage, strength and love. As these four women are about to discover. Charlie, the rootless daughter of American missionaries, now working as a hairdresser in Northern California. But the repercussions of a traumatic childhood far from home have left her struggling for her way in life. Bea, Charlie's eccentric grandmother, who is convinced a reunion with her estranged mother will help Charlie heal. Lizbeth, a Texas widow who has never strayed too far from home. She is on a daunting journey into the unknown, searching for the grandchild she never knew existed. And Senzey, a young Haitian mother dealing with a lifetime of love and loss, who shows them the true meaning of bravery. Together they venture through the teeming, colorful streets of Port-au-Prince, into the worlds of do-gooders doing more harm than good, Vodou practitioners, artists, activists, and everyday Haitian men and women determined to survive against all odds. For Charlie, Bea, Lizbeth and Senzey, life will never be the same again . . .

Return to the Little Coffee Shop of Kabul

This compelling story of a cafe in the heart of Afghanistan, and the men and women who meet there, is full of heart and intelligence' LOOK MAGAZINE 'A brilliant story of strength and appreciation of difference that restores belief in ...

Return to the Little Coffee Shop of Kabul

Six women forever joined by a little cafe in Kabul Sunny, former proprietor of the Little Coffee Shop and new owner of the Screaming Peacock vineyard. Can she handle the challenges of life on her own? Yasmina, the young mother who now runs the cafe, until a terrifying event strikes at the heart of her family and business... Layla and Kat Afghan teenagers in America, struggling to make sense of their place in the world... Zara, about to be forced into a marriage which will have devastating consequences... These women are about to learn what Halajan, Yazmina's rebellious mother-in-law, has known all along: when the world as you know it disappears, you find a new way to live. Reuniting us with the much-loved cast of the international bestseller, The Little Coffee Shop of Kabul. Deborah Rodriguez tells an inspiring story of women's strength and courage in a changing world.

The Taliban Afghanistan s Most Lethal Insurgents

“The Sound of Afghanistan's Revival: Music; Squelched by the Fundamentalist ... Source: “Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil,” (Book ...

The Taliban  Afghanistan s Most Lethal Insurgents

Understand the complexities of the most lethal insurgent group of America's longest war—the Taliban. • Provides insights from an author with academic training in politics and economics as well as a 30-year defense intelligence community background, including serving as an Army analyst in Afghanistan • Presents information recently obtained under the Freedom of Information Act • Analyzes the tribal, religious, political, and international elements of the greater Taliban problem

Women s Writing and Muslim Societies

An American future: the Kabul Beauty school Deborah Rodriguez's The Kabul ... In 2002, Rodriguez volunteered for aid work in Afghanistan as part of an ...

Women s Writing and Muslim Societies

Women’s Writing and Muslim Societies looks at the rise in works concerning Muslim societies by both western and Muslim women – from pioneering female travellers like Freya Stark and Edith Wharton in the early twentieth century, whose accounts of the Orient were usually playful and humorous, to the present day and such works as Azar Nafisi’s Reading Lolita in Tehran and Betty Mahmoody’s Not Without My Daughter, which present a radically different view of Muslim Societies marked by fear, hostility and even disgust. The author, Sharif Gemie, also considers a new range of female Muslim writers whose works suggest a variety of other perspectives that speak of difficult journeys, the problems of integration, identity crises and the changing nature of Muslim cultures; in the process, this volume examines varied journeys across cultural, political and religious borders, discussing the problems faced by female travellers, the problems of trans-cultural romances and the difficulties of constructing dialogue between enemy camps.

Gendering Counterinsurgency

In 2002 Mary McMakin along with a number of American hairstylists set up the temporarily successful Kabul Beauty Academy.8 It received donations from a ...

Gendering Counterinsurgency

This book analyses the various ways counterinsurgency in Afghanistan is gendered. The book examines the US led war in Afghanistan from 2001 onwards, including the invasion, the population-centric counterinsurgency operations and the efforts to train a new Afghan military charged with securing the country when the US and NATO withdrew their combat forces in 2014. Through an analysis of key counterinsurgency texts and military memoirs, the book explores how gender and counterinsurgency are co-constitutive in numerous ways. It discusses the multiple military masculinities that counterinsurgency relies on, the discourse of ‘cultural sensitivity’, and the deployment of Female Engagement Teams (FETs). Gendering Counterinsurgency demonstrates how population-centric counterinsurgency doctrine and practice can be captured within a gendered dynamic of ‘killing and caring’ – reliant on physical violence, albeit mediated through ‘armed social work’. This simultaneously contradictory and complementary dynamic cannot be understood without recognising how the legitimation and the practice of this war relied on multiple gendered embodied performances of masculinities and femininities. Developing the concept of ‘embodied performativity’ this book shows how the clues to understanding counterinsurgency, as well as gendering war more broadly are found in war’s everyday gendered manifestations. This book will be of much interest to students of counterinsurgency warfare, gender politics, governmentality, biopolitics, critical war studies, and critical security studies in general.