Kant on Evil Self Deception and Moral Reform

Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform addresses this crucial element of Kant's ethical theory.

Kant on Evil  Self Deception  and Moral Reform

Throughout his writings, and particularly in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Kant alludes to the idea that evil is connected to self-deceit, and while numerous commentators regard this as a highly attractive thesis, none have seriously explored it. Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform addresses this crucial element of Kant's ethical theory. Working with both Kant's core texts on ethics and materials less often cited within scholarship on Kant's practical philosophy (such as Kant's logic lectures), Papish explores the cognitive dimensions of Kant's accounts of evil and moral reform while engaging the most influential -- and often scathing -- of Kant's critics. Her book asks what self-deception is for Kant, why and how it is connected to evil, and how we achieve the self-knowledge that should take the place of self-deceit. She offers novel defenses of Kant's widely dismissed claims that evil is motivated by self-love and that an evil is rooted universally in human nature, and she develops original arguments concerning how social institutions and interpersonal relationships facilitate, for Kant, the self-knowledge that is essential to moral reform. In developing and defending Kant's understanding of evil, moral reform, and their cognitive underpinnings, Papish not only makes an important contribution to Kant scholarship. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform also reveals how much contemporary moral philosophers, philosophers of religion, and general readers interested in the phenomenon of evil stand to gain by taking seriously Kant's views.

Kant on Evil Self Deception and Moral Reform

incorporation, of self-love alongside respect, 47–51, 48n34 incorporation thesis, 40 independence of thought and churches, 226–227 in ethical community, 225–227 indifferentism, to good and evil, 56 individual character development of, ...

Kant on Evil  Self Deception  and Moral Reform

Throughout his writings, and particularly in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Kant alludes to the idea that evil is connected to self-deceit, and while numerous commentators regard this as a highly attractive thesis, none have seriously explored it. Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform addresses this crucial element of Kant's ethical theory. Working with both Kant's core texts on ethics and materials less often cited within scholarship on Kant's practical philosophy (such as Kant's logic lectures), Papish explores the cognitive dimensions of Kant's accounts of evil and moral reform while engaging the most influential -- and often scathing -- of Kant's critics. Her book asks what self-deception is for Kant, why and how it is connected to evil, and how we achieve the self-knowledge that should take the place of self-deceit. She offers novel defenses of Kant's widely dismissed claims that evil is motivated by self-love and that an evil is rooted universally in human nature, and she develops original arguments concerning how social institutions and interpersonal relationships facilitate, for Kant, the self-knowledge that is essential to moral reform. In developing and defending Kant's understanding of evil, moral reform, and their cognitive underpinnings, Papish not only makes an important contribution to Kant scholarship. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform also reveals how much contemporary moral philosophers, philosophers of religion, and general readers interested in the phenomenon of evil stand to gain by taking seriously Kant's views.

Aesthetic Experience and Moral Vision in Plato Kant and Murdoch

The problem that moral education faces is, therefore, if and how it is possible to influence the outcome of the choice in ... See Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self Deception, and Moral Reform, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018).

Aesthetic Experience and Moral Vision in Plato  Kant  and Murdoch

This book addresses how Plato, Kant, and Iris Murdoch (each in different ways) view the connection aesthetic experience has to morality. While offering an examination of Iris Murdoch’s philosophy, it analyses deeply the suggestive links (as well as essential distinctions) between Plato’s and Kant’s philosophies. Meredith Trexler Drees considers not only Iris Murdoch’s concept of unselfing, but also its relationship with Kant’s view of Achtung and Plato’s view of Eros. In addition, Trexler Drees suggests an extended, and partially amended, version of Murdoch’s view, arguing that it is more compatible with a religious way of life than Murdoch herself realized. This leads to an expansion of the overall argument to include Kant’s affirmation of religion as an area of life that can be improved through Plato’s and Murdoch’s vision of how being good and being beautiful can be part of the same life-task.

The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology

Manuel Vargas, John Doris, Peter L Dyson Professor of Ethics in Organizations and Life John Doris ... The missing formal proof of humanity's radical evil in Kant's religion. ... Kant on Evil, Self- Deception, and Moral Reform.

The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology

The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art overview of moral psychology. The 50 chapters, written by leading figures in both philosophy and psychology, cover many of the most important topics in the field and form the definitive survey of contemporary moral psychology.

Forgiveness and Its Moral Dimensions

“For Community's Sake: A (self- respecting) Kantian Account of Forgiveness. ... “The Missing Formal Proof of Humanity's Radical Evil in Kant's Religion.” The Philosophical Review 114, ... Kant on Evil, Self- Deception, and Moral Reform.

Forgiveness and Its Moral Dimensions

"What is to forgive someone? Is it primarily a change in one's emotions, in one's behavior, or something else? What is the connection between forgiveness and blaming attitudes like resentment? What is the relationship between forgiveness and free will? The essays in this book explore not only these questions about the nature of forgiveness, but also questions about the norms of forgiveness. Is forgiveness necessarily gift-like, and thus always discretionary? Is forgiveness ever prohibited or required? What is the relationship between forgiveness and apology? Does love require us to forgive? How does one maintain self-respect when one forgives? Is it morally permissible to forgive people for doing evil? And what would a utilitarian theory of the norms of forgiveness look like? This volume contains entirely new essays on forgiveness by some of the world's leading moral philosophers. Some contributors have been writing about forgiveness for decades. Others have taken the opportunity here to develop their thinking about forgiveness they broached in other work. For some contributors, this is their first time stepping into the forgiveness literature. While all the contributions address core questions about the nature and norms of forgiveness, they also collectively break new ground by raising entirely new questions, offering original proposals and arguments, and making connections to what have until now been treated as separate areas within philosophy"--

Kant s Doctrine of Virtue

“Kant's Moral Theory,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Spring 2019 Edition), Edward N. Zalta, ed., ... Kant on Evil, Self- Deception, and Moral Reform (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press). Pasternack, L. R. 2014.

Kant s Doctrine of Virtue

Immanuel Kant's final publication in ethics was The Doctrine of Virtue, Part II of the 1797 The Metaphysics of Morals. This text presents Kant's normative ethical theory. This guide is meant to be read alongside Kant's text, combining accessible explanations and novel interpretations of this difficult text. It is the first book in English devoted to The Doctrine of Virtue, one of Kant's most significant works. Timmons divides the guide into five parts. Part I reviews Kant's life, the history and significance of The Doctrine of Virtue, and situates Kant's ethics within his general metaphysical and epistemological views. Part II is devoted to the General Introduction to The Metaphysics of Morals, which is essential for understanding Kant's ethics. Part III and Part IV turn to The Doctrine of Virtue itself, exploring Kant's defense of a system of duties and corresponding virtues. Part V examines Kant's conception of moral education, the practice of virtue, and the conclusion to the book where Kant explains why the discipline of ethics does not include religion as a doctrine of duties to God. Timmons concludes the book highlighting key aspects of The Doctrine of Virtue, situating Kant's ethical theory in relation to other normative ethical theories. This guide is a vital resource for both students and scholars interested in ethics and the history of philosophy.

Kant s Conception of Freedom

Ortwein, Birger, Kants problematische Freiheitslehre (Bonn: Bouvier, 1983). Papish, Laura, Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). Paton, H. J., The Categorical Imperative: A Study in ...

Kant s Conception of Freedom

Although a good deal has been written about Kant's conception of free will in recent years, there has been no serious attempt to examine in detail the development of his views on the topic. This book endeavours to remedy the situation by tracing Kant's thoughts on free will from his earliest discussions of it in the 1750s through to his last accounts in the 1790s. This developmental approach is of interest for at least two reasons. First, it shows that the path that led Kant to view freedom as a transcendental power that is both radically distinct from and compatible with the causality of nature was a winding one. Second, it indicates that, despite the variety of views of free will that Kant held at various times, the concept occupied a central place in his thought, because it was the point of union between his theoretical and practical philosophy.

Kant s Justification of Ethics

Kant on Evil , Self - Deception , and Moral Reform . Oxford : Oxford University Press . Paton , Herbert . 1947. The Categorical Imperative : A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy . London : Hutchinson University Library . Pereboom , Derk .

Kant s Justification of Ethics

Kant's arguments for the reality of human freedom and the normativity of the moral law continue to inspire work in contemporary moral philosophy. Many prominent ethicists invoke Kant, directly or indirectly, in their efforts to derive the authority of moral requirements from a more basic conception of action, agency, or rationality. But many commentators have detected a deep rift between the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals and the Critique of Practical Reason, leaving Kant's project of justification exposed to conflicting assessments and interpretations. In this ground-breaking study of Kant, Owen Ware defends the controversial view that Kant's mature writings on ethics share a unified commitment to the moral law's primacy. Using both close analysis and historical contextualization, Owen Ware overturns a paradigmatic way of reading Kant's arguments for morality and freedom, situating them within Kant's critical methodology at large. The result is a novel understanding of Kant that challenges much of what goes under the banner of Kantian arguments for moral normativity today.

Kant on Morality Humanity and Legality

Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Papish, Laura. 2018. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform. New York: Oxford University Press. Ripstein, Arthur. 2009.

Kant on Morality  Humanity  and Legality

It was not so long ago that the dominant picture of Kant’s practical philosophy was formalistic, focusing almost exclusively on his Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and Critique of Practical Reason. However, the overall picture of Kant’s wide-ranging philosophy has since been broadened and deepened. We now have a much more complete understanding of the range of Kant’s practical interests and of his contributions to areas as diverse as anthropology, pedagogy, and legal theory. What remains somewhat obscure, however, is how these different contributions hang together in the way that Kant suggests that they must. This book explores these different conceptions of humanity, morality, and legality in Kant as main ‘manifestations’ or ‘dimensions’ of practical normativity. These interrelated terms play a crucial role in highlighting different rational obligations, their source(s), and their applicability in the face of changing circumstances.

The Moral Psychology of Guilt

“Dignity, Honour, and Human Rights: Kant's Perspective. ... Morality, Authority, and Law: Essays in Second-Personal Ethics I. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Denis, Lara (2014). ... Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform.

The Moral Psychology of Guilt

Philosophers and psychologists come together to think systematically about the nature and value of guilt, looking at the biological origins and psychological nature of guilt, and then discussing the culturally enriched conceptions of this vital moral emotion.

Kant and Religion

Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pascal, Blaise (1995). Pensées. Translated by A. J. Krailsheimer. London: Penguin. Cited by section (§). Pasternack, Lawrence (2014). Guidebook to Kant's ...

Kant and Religion

Explores Kant's philosophy of religion and morality through his Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason.

Historical Dictionary of Kant and Kantianism

Kant's Impure Ethics: From Rational Beings to Human Beings. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. ... Der gesuchte Widerstreit: Die Antinomie in Kants Kritik der praktischen Vernunft. ... Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform.

Historical Dictionary of Kant and Kantianism

Immanuel Kant was one of the most significant philosophers of the modern age. Historical Dictionary of Kant and Kantianism, Second Edition contains a chronology, an introduction, appendixes, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 500 cross-referenced entries on key terms of Kant’s philosophy, Kant’s major works and cover his most important predecessors and successors, concentrating especially on the relation of these thinkers to Kant himself. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Immanuel Kant.

Heidegger s Entscheidung

Consider Laura Papish's recent book, Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform, wherein Papish aptly characterizes the more or less standard understanding of Kant's account of ethics: Kant's moral writings largely discuss the ...

Heidegger   s Entscheidung

This book critically examines the debate on Martin Heidegger’s concept of Entscheidung ("decision") and his engagement and confrontation with Nazism in terms of his broader philosophical thought. It argues that one cannot explain Heidegger’s actions without accounting for his idea of "decision" and its connection to his understanding of individual "fate" and national (and European) "destiny." The book looks at the relation of biography to philosophy and the ethical and political implications of appropriating Heidegger’s thinking in these domains of inquiry. It highlights themes such as Heidegger’s differences with the neo-Kantians in Germany; Heidegger on Kant and practical reason; and his reading of Nietzsche and Hegel. It offers a philosophical assessment grounded in Heidegger’s own texts, with reference to historical and other philosophical commentaries on the rise of National Socialism in post-Weimar Germany and the philosophical issues associated with the interpretation of Nazi genocide and ideology. An important intervention in Western philosophy, this book will be of great interest to scholars and researchers of political philosophy, continental philosophy, German philosophy, philosophy in general, and political studies.

Rationalizing Vern nfteln

Moeller, Sophie (2020) Kant's Tribunal of Reason (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press). Moran, Kate (2014) ʻDelusions of ... Papish, Laura (2018) Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform (Oxford: Oxford University Press).

Rationalizing  Vern  nfteln

Kant was a keen psychological observer and theorist of the forms, mechanisms and sources of self-deception. In this Element, the author discusses the role of rationalizing/Vernünfteln for Kant's moral psychology, normative ethics and philosophical methodology. By drawing on the full breadth of examples of rationalizing Kant discusses, the author shows how rationalizing can extend to general features of morality and corrupt rational agents thoroughly (albeit not completely and not irreversibly). Furthermore, the author explains the often-overlooked roles common human reason, empirical practical reason and even pure practical reason play for rationalizing. Kant is aware that rationality is a double-edged sword; reason is the source of morality and of our dignity, but it also enables us to seemingly justify moral transgressions to ourselves, and it creates an interest in this justification in the first place. Finally, this Element discusses whether Kant's ethical theory itself can be criticised as a product of rationalizing.

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

Hence for Kant, struggle against self-wrought evil tendencies involves reform of society: “The dominion of the good ... By diagnosing evil partly as self-deception, Kant 53 See S. Anderson-Gold, Unnecessary Evil: History and Moral ...

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

Leading scholars of Kant examine and elucidate his views on evil and how they can be extended to contemporary questions.

Feeling Like It

For a recent treatment of the topic, see Laura Papish, Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform. 17 Buss holds that even when we reject the authority of our reason, we do so by acting on a reason. I think this oversimplifies ...

Feeling Like It

You may have an inclination to do it, but there is still a moment when you can decide to do it or not. This "moment of drama" is more puzzling than it first appears. When you are inclined to do something, are you related to your inclination as rider to horse? As ruler to subject? As thinker to thoughts? Schapiro shows that these familiar pictures fail to confront the central puzzle. Inclinations are motives with respect to which we are distinctively passive. But to be motivated is to be active—to be self-moved. How can you be passive in relation to your own activity? Schapiro puts forward an "inner animal" view, inspired by Kant, which holds that when you are merely inclined to act, the instinctive part of yourself is already active, while the rest of you is not. At this moment, your will is at a crossroads. You can humanize your inclination, or you can dehumanize yourself. Feeling Like It provides a concise and accessible investigation of a new problem at the intersection of ethics, philosophy of action, and philosophy of mind.

Choosing Freedom

Community and Moral Progress in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Washington DC: Catholic University Press, 2012. Papish, Laura. Kanton Evil, Self- Deception, and Moral Reform. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. Preston- Roedder, Ryan.

Choosing Freedom

An exploration of everything Kant's philosophy can teach us about being the best people we can be, from using our human reasoning to its fullest potential to being affably drunk at dinner parties. Immanuel Kant is well known as one of the towering figures of Western philosophical history, but he is less well known for his savvy advice about hosting dinner parties. This philosophical genius was a man of many interests and talents: his famously formal and abstract ethical system is only part of his story. But Kant not only made a profound impact on how people think about big questions like how to treat one another -- he also offered wise insights on things people confront in everyday life: things like gossip, friendship, manners, self-respect, cheerfulness, gratitude, mockery, contempt, and yes, dinner parties. In this book, philosopher Karen Stohr shows how Kant's whole ethical picture fits together. It's a picture that is as relevant and useful now as it was in the 18th century--and maybe even more so. A Kantian way of living means using reason to guide your choices so that your life reflects your true nature as a free, rational being. This nature is one we share with others; Kantianism emphasizes the fundamental dignity and equality of each person. It presents an ideal for how we should live together without downplaying the challenges we face in the actual world. Though realistic about human weaknesses, Kant remained optimistic about our capacities and possibilities. He had great faith in the ability of human reason to point us in the direction of moral progress and to get us there. Each of us has the power within us to know and choose the right path--we just have to be willing to make that choice, and to discover how worthwhile life can be in the process.

Freedom and Anthropology in Kant s Moral Philosophy

It is particularly important to point out Kant's awareness of this problem of self - deception in the context of those who ... under different maxims but also of the human tendency to use this fact as a means of justifying evil deeds .

Freedom and Anthropology in Kant s Moral Philosophy

Table of contents

Natur und Freiheit

September 2015 an der Universität Wien stattgefunden hat, versammeln die Ergebnisse dieses Kongresses. Mit dem Thema "Natur und Freiheit" wurde zwei tragenden Begriffen des Kritischen Werks Kants Rechnung getragen.

Natur und Freiheit


The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism and Existentialism

Rather, we only choose or constitute ourselves insofar as we are moral beings who are good or evil. ... In this context, Kant suggests that we can overcome self-deception by converting from evil to good (Kant 1900ff., vol. 6, pp.

The Palgrave Handbook of German Idealism and Existentialism

This Handbook explores the complex relations between two great schools of continental philosophy: German idealism and existentialism. While the existentialists are commonly thought to have rejected idealism as overly abstract and neglectful of the concrete experience of the individual, the chapters in this collection reveal that the German idealists in fact anticipated many key existentialist ideas. A radically new vision of the history of continental philosophy is thereby established, one that understands existentialism as a continuous development from German idealism. Key Features Operates at both the macro-level and micro-level, treating both the two schools of thought and the individual thinkers associated with them Explores the relations from shifting perspectives by examining how the German idealists anticipated existentialist themes and how the existentialists concretely drew on the work of the idealists Meticulously uncovers and documents many little-known points of contact between the German idealists and the existentialists Includes often neglected figures such as Jacobi and Trendelenburg This Handbook is an essential resource for researchers and advanced students interested in thinking critically about the broad development of continental philosophy. Moreover, the individual chapters on specific philosophers contain a wealth of information that will compel experts in the field to reconsider their views on these figures.