Karok Myths

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact.

Karok Myths

This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1980.

Karok Myths

Karok Myths


Karok Myths

Karok Myths


Dictionary of Native American Literature

Bright, “A Karok Myth in Measured Verse” [1979]; McLendon, “Meaning, Rhetorical Structure, and Discourse Organization in Myth” [1982]). Useful surveys, with bibliographies, are provided for California by Heizer, “Mythology” (1978) and ...

Dictionary of Native American Literature

First Published in 1995. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Handbook of Native American Literature

Bright, "A Karok Myth in Measured Verse" [1979]; McLendon, "Meaning, Rhetorical Structure, and Discourse Organization in Myth" [1982]). Useful surveys, with bibliographies, are provided for California by Heizer, "Mythology" (1978) and ...

Handbook of Native American Literature

The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers. Divided into three major sections, Native American Oral Literatures, The Historical Emergence of Native American Writing, and A Native American Renaissance: 1967 to the Present, it includes 22 lengthy essays, written by scholars of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. The book features reports on the oral traditions of various tribes and topics such as the relation of the Bible, dreams, oratory, humor, autobiography, and federal land policies to Native American literature. Eight additional essays cover teaching Native American literature, new fiction, new theater, and other important topics, and there are bio-critical essays on more than 40 writers ranging from William Apes (who in the early 19th century denounced white society's treatment of his people) to contemporary poet Ray Young Bear. Packed with information that was once scattered and scarce, the Handbook of Native American Literature -a valuable one-volume resource-is sure to appeal to everyone interested in Native American history, culture, and literature. Previously published in cloth as The Dictionary of Native American Literature

Myths of the Native Americans

“A Visit to the Land of the Dead” is based mainly on: • Two Karuk myths recorded by A. L. Kroeber in the vicinity of Katimin village, northwest California, in 1902, and published as “A Karok Orpheus Myth” in The Journal of American ...

Myths of the Native Americans

Learn the history, geography, and life of different Native American tribes and use these tools to investigate religions and stories of the Native Americans. Check out maps, sidebars, and more!

Yurok Myths

Karok Inam , at Clear Creek . It has a world renewal ceremony , and the dance is often listed as Deerskin , but is actually of surrogate type with otter or fisher skins or brush . Hence the myth mentions it slightingly . 3.

Yurok Myths


American Indian Linguistics and Literature

Introduction Like many native groups of western North American, the Karok of Northwestern California believed that the earth had once been inhabited by a pre-human race—the iéxaréeyavs, translatable as 'First People'." Their myths ...

American Indian Linguistics and Literature


The Life of Language

1980 Karok myths . A. L. Kroeber , E. W. Gifford . Berkeley and Los Angeles : University of California Press . Harrington , John P. 1930 “ Karok texts ” , International Journal of American Linguistics 6 : 121-161 .

The Life of Language

The series publishes state-of-the-art work on core areas of linguistics across theoretical frameworks as well as studies that provide new insights by building bridges to neighbouring fields such as neuroscience and cognitive science. The series considers itself a forum for cutting-edge research based on solid empirical data on language in its various manifestations, including sign languages. It regards linguistic variation in its synchronic and diachronic dimensions as well as in its social contexts as important sources of insight for a better understanding of the design of linguistic systems and the ecology and evolution of language.

The Naked Man

... 520-22 Kalina myths , 220 , 551 Iktomi , 516 Kalipsel myths , 466 Immigration , see population movements Kansa , 348 Incest , 125 , 141 , 172–3 , 222—3 , 388 ; Kápka , 32 , 34 association with destructive fire , 135 , Karok myths ...

The Naked Man

"The Naked Man is the fourth and final volume [of Mythologiques], written by the most influential and probably the most controversial anthropologist of our time. . . . Myths from North and South America are set side by side to show their transformations: in passing from person to person and place to place, a myth can change its content and yet retain its structural principles. . . . Apart from the complicated transformations discovered and the fascinating constructions placed on these, the stories themselves provide a feast."—Betty Abel, Contemporary Review "Lévi-Strauss uses the structural method he developed to analyze and 'decode' the mythology of native North Americans, focusing on the area west of the Rockies. . . . [The author] takes the opportunity to refute arguments against his method; his chapter 'Finale' is a defense of structural analysis as well as the closing statement of this four-volume opus which started with an 'Ouverture' in The Raw and the Cooked."—Library Journal "The culmination of one of the major intellectual feats of our time."—Paul Stuewe, Quill and Quire

Studies in American Folklife

Karuk Bean , Lowell John , and Charles R. Smith . ... “ Karuk Indian Myths , " Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 107. ... Karok Myths . Berkeley and Los Angeles : University of California Press , 1980 . Mills , Elaine L. , ed .

Studies in American Folklife


The Federal Cylinder Project

Karuk > Bean , Lowell John , and Charles R. Smith . ... Karuk Indian Myths , ” Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin 107. ... Karok Myths . Berkeley and Los Angeles : University of California Press , 1980 . Mills , Elaine L. , ed .

The Federal Cylinder Project


Surviving Through the Days

Chumash Oral Narratives ; Alfred Kroeber's Yurok Myths , A Mohave Historical Epic , Seven Mohave Myths , and More Mohave Myths ; Alfred Kroeber and Edward Gifford's Karok Myths ; Robert Spott and Alfred Kroeber's Yurok Narratives ...

Surviving Through the Days

"This unique and original book sets the standard for such volumes. I can't see anyone coming along for quite some time who would be able to supersede it or top it for quality and inclusiveness."—Brian Swann, editor of Coming to Light "It is a masterful treatment of oral literature…a wonderful combination of great verbal art and sound scholarship, carefully crafted so that the collection begins and ends with a powerful creation tale."—Leanne Hinton, author of Flutes of Fire "Since each of the contributing specialists has first-hand familiarity with the material, the translations are of unusual authenticity and the annotations are of unusual insightfulness. Luthin's own introductory sections are especially vivid and well-informed."—William Bright, author of A Coyote Reader

California Indian Languages

Karok Myths. Edited by Grace Buzaljko. Berkeley: University of California Press. Kroeber, Alfred L., and George William Grace. 1960. The Sparkman Grammar of Luiseño. UC-PL 16. (See also EDDMA, nos. 26–29.) Kroeber, Alfred L., and John ...

California Indian Languages

"Victor Golla has been the leading scholar of California Indian languages for most of his professional life, and this book shows why. His ability to synthesize centuries of fieldwork and writings while bringing forward new ideas and fresh ways of looking at California’s famous linguistic diversity will make this the primary text for anyone interested in California languages."--Leanne Hinton, Professor Emerita of Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley and author of How to Keep Your Language Alive “This book is a wonderful contribution that only Golla could have written. It is a perfect confluence of author and subject matter.”--Ives Goddard, Senior Linguist, Emeritus, Smithsonian Institution "Golla is a gifted polymath and California Indian Languages is certainly his landmark achievement, required reading for any linguist, archaeologist, ethnographer, or historian interested in aboriginal California."--Robert L. Bettinger, Professor of Anthropology, University of California Davis and author of Hunter-Gatherer Foraging "The preeminent figure in his field, Victor Golla has written a masterpiece filled with treasures for every audience: Indian communities working toward cultural and linguistic revival; general readers interested in the many cultures of Native California; and scholars in the fields of language, archaeology, and prehistory. The information here is so detailed that it supersedes all previous reference works."--Andrew Garrett, Professor of Linguistics, University of California Berkeley and Director, Survey of California and Other Indian Languages “This is a truly magnificent work, at once authoritative, comprehensive, accessible to a wide readership, and fascinating. Masterfully integrating linguistic, archaeological, historical, and cultural information, the author describes not just the languages, but also the major figures in the story: speakers, explorers, missionaries, and scholars. It is beautifully written, a great pleasure to read, and difficult to put down."--Marianne Mithun, author of The Languages of Native North America

The Inland Whale

“ Shasta and Athapascan Myths from Oregon . ” Leo J. Frachtenberg , ed . ... Gayton , Anna H. “ The Orpheus Myth in North America . ” Journal of American Folklore ... Typewritten copy from field notebook of Karok myths . Unpublished .

The Inland Whale

A retelling of nine stories from California Indian legends.

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California

Yet it was only after Kroeber's death that this work was eventually published under the title Karok Myths in 1980 , under ... William Bright supplied a lengthy linguistic index , though reference to the Karuk language is quite sparse ...

Cultural Contact and Linguistic Relativity Among the Indians of Northwestern California

Examines the linguistic relativity principle in relation to the Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk Indians Despite centuries of intertribal contact, the American Indian peoples of northwestern California have continued to speak a variety of distinct languages. At the same time, they have come to embrace a common way of life based on salmon fishing and shared religious practices. In this thought-provoking re-examination of the hypothesis of linguistic relativity, Sean O’Neill looks closely at the Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk peoples to explore the striking juxtaposition between linguistic diversity and relative cultural uniformity among their communities. O’Neill examines intertribal contact, multilingualism, storytelling, and historical change among the three tribes, focusing on the traditional culture of the region as it existed during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He asks important historical questions at the heart of the linguistic relativity hypothesis: Have the languages in fact grown more similar as a result of contact, multilingualism, and cultural convergence? Or have they instead maintained some of their striking grammatical and semantic differences? Through comparison of the three languages, O’Neill shows that long-term contact among the tribes intensified their linguistic differences, creating unique Hupa, Yurok, and Karuk identities. If language encapsulates worldview, as the principle of linguistic relativity suggests, then this region’s linguistic diversity is puzzling. Analyzing patterns of linguistic accommodation as seen in the semantics of space and time, grammatical classification, and specialized cultural vocabularies, O’Neill resolves the apparent paradox by assessing long-term effects of contact.

Myths of the Origin of Fire

The Karok Indians of California tell of a time in the early ages of the world when their ancestors had no fire. For the Creator, Kareya, who had made both men and animals, had not given them fire; on the contrary, he had hidden it in a ...

Myths of the Origin of Fire

Sir James G. Frazer (1854-1941) is famous as the author of The Golden Bough, but his work ranged widely across classics, cultural history, folklore and literary criticism as well as anthropology. A Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, for 62 years, Sir James G. Frazer devoted his life to research. This volume was first published in 1930.

Reading the Fire

Alan Dundes, “Introduction” to Karok Myths, ed. ... of the storytelling context of one Western tribe, see Theodore Stern, “Some Sources of Variability in Klamath Mythology,” Journal of American Folklore 69 (1956):1–9, 135–46, 377–86. 4.

Reading the Fire

Reading the Fire engages America�s �first literatures,� traditional Native American tales and legends, as literary art and part of our collective imaginative heritage. This revised edition of a book first published to critical acclaim in 1983 includes four new essays. Drawing on ethnographic data and regional folklore, Jarold Ramsey moves from origin and trickster narratives and Indian ceremonial texts, into interpretations of stories from the Nez Perce, Clackamas Chinook, Coos, Wasco, and Tillamook repertories, concluding with a set of essays on the neglected subject of Native literary responses to contact with Euroamericans. In his finely worked, erudite analyses, he mediates between an author-centered, print-based narrative tradition and one that is oral, anonymous, and tribal, adducing parallels between Native texts and works by Shakespeare, Yeats, Beckett, and Faulkner.

Fire Race

A Karuk Coyote Tale of How Fire Came to the People Jonathan London, Lanny Pinola. BIBLIOGRAPHY. KAROK MYTHS by AL Kroeber and EW. GilTord (University lot—California Press; most notably the stories told by Little Ike in 1902 and Mary Ike ...

Fire Race

With the help of other animals, Wise Old Coyote manages to acquire fire from the wicked Yellow Jacket sisters.