Kierkegaard s Writings XVI Volume 16

KEY TO REFERENCES Marginal references alongside the text are to volume and page [IX 100] in Soren Kierkegaards Samlede Vaprker, I-XIV, edited by A. B. Drachmann, J. L. Heiberg, and H. O. Lange (1 ed., Copenhagen: Gyldendal, 1901–06).

Kierkegaard s Writings  XVI  Volume 16

The various kinds and conditions of love are a common theme for Kierkegaard, beginning with his early Either/Or, through "The Diary of the Seducer" and Judge William's eulogy on married love, to his last work, on the changelessness of God's love. Works of Love, the midpoint in the series, is also the monumental high point, because of its penetrating, illuminating analysis of the forms and sources of love. Love as feeling and mood is distinguished from works of love, love of the lovable from love of the unlovely, preferential love from love as the royal law, love as mutual egotism from triangular love, and erotic love from self-giving love. This work is marked by Kierkegaard's Socratic awareness of the reader, both as the center of awakened understanding and as the initiator of action. Written to be read aloud, the book conveys a keenness of thought and an insightful, poetic imagination that make such an attentive approach richly rewarding. Works of Love not only serves as an excellent place to begin exploring the writings of Kierkegaard, but also rewards many rereadings.

Humanity in God s Image

22 Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man (London: Penguin Books, 1965), 7. ... 30 Cf. Søren Kierkegaard, Works of Love: Some Christian Deliberations in the Form of Discourses in KW XVI, ... KW is quoted with the number of volume and page.

Humanity in God s Image

How can we, in our times, understand the biblical concept that human beings have been created in the image of an invisible God? This is a perennial but increasingly pressing question that lies at the heart of theological anthropology. Humanity in God's Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration clarifies the meaning of this concept, traces different Jewish and Christian interpretations of being created in God's image, and reconsiders the significance of the imago Dei in a post-Holocaust context. As normative, counter-factual notions, human dignity and the imago Dei challenge us to see more. Claudia Welz offers an interdisciplinary exploration of theological and ethical 'visions' of the invisible. By analysing poetry and art, Welz exemplifies human self-understanding in the interface between the visual and the linguistic. The content of the imago Dei cannot be defined apart from the image carrier: an embodied creature. Compared to verbal, visual, and mental images, how does this creature as a 'living image' refer to God—like a metaphor, a mimetic mirror, or an elusive trace? Combining hermeneutical and phenomenological perspectives with philosophy of religion and philosophy of language, semiotics, art history, and literary studies, Welz regards the imago Dei as a complex sign that is at once iconic, indexical, and symbolical—pointing beyond itself.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXVI Volume 26

Cumulative Index to Kierkegaard's Writings ... XVI:235–36, XVII:46–47, 53, 56, 84, 374 (See also analogies:children); among thieves, XVI:285–86; excluded, XVII: 263; and father, XV:51, 56–57, 136, 204, 274; and freedom, VII:16; helping, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXVI  Volume 26

The final volume of Princeton's Kierkegaard's Writings series, the Cumulative Index provides wide-ranging navigation to the preceding twenty-five volumes. Composed of over 90,000 entries, the Cumulative Index offers access to Kierkegaard's complex authorship and the extraordinary range of subjects he addressed in his writing. Covering the series' historical introductions, primary works, supplementary material (journal entries), and footnotes, the Cumulative Index provides a comprehensive entryway to more than 11,000 pages of text. Readers are able to survey via extended entries Kierkegaard's dual authorship, pseudonymous and signed; his numerous biblical allusions; his references to Christianity, God, and love; and his frequent use of analogies. A cumulative collation of the extensive supplementary material is also included, giving researchers and avid readers the opportunity to cross-reference Kierkegaard's Writings with his journals and papers published elsewhere in both English and Danish.

Volume 16 Tome I Kierkegaard s Literary Figures and Motifs

bibliography of further readings.8 The precise nature of the project Kierkegaard was working on at this time remains ... the only afterlife Kierkegaard's early Faust-studies had is found in shorter discussions in two of his first books, ...

Volume 16  Tome I  Kierkegaard s Literary Figures and Motifs

While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard. The volume is arranged alphabetically by name, with Tome I covering figures and motifs from Agamemnon to Guadalquivir.

Volume 16 Tome II Kierkegaard s Literary Figures and Motifs

Kierkegaard describes Zerlina«s perplexity before, during, and after the seduction when writing about what it is to be sacrificed, and when referring ... Act I, Scene 21; Don Giovanni, Bärenreiter (BA 4550a), Act I, Scenes XVI¥XX, No.

Volume 16  Tome II  Kierkegaard s Literary Figures and Motifs

While Kierkegaard is perhaps known best as a religious thinker and philosopher, there is an unmistakable literary element in his writings. He often explains complex concepts and ideas by using literary figures and motifs that he could assume his readers would have some familiarity with. This dimension of his thought has served to make his writings far more popular than those of other philosophers and theologians, but at the same time it has made their interpretation more complex. Kierkegaard readers are generally aware of his interest in figures such as Faust or the Wandering Jew, but they rarely have a full appreciation of the vast extent of his use of characters from different literary periods and traditions. The present volume is dedicated to the treatment of the variety of literary figures and motifs used by Kierkegaard. The volume is arranged alphabetically by name, with Tome II covering figures and motifs from Gulliver to Zerlina.

Heiberg s Perseus and Other Texts

KW, vol. 9. Pap. I-XVI = Søren Kierkegaards Papirer, vols. 1-16, ed. by P.A. Heiberg, V. Kuhr and E.Torsting. Copenhagen: Gyldendal 190948; supplemented by Niels Thulstrup. Copenhagen: Gyldendal 1968-78. Cited by volume number and entry ...

Heiberg s Perseus and Other Texts

The poet and part-time philosopher Johan Ludvig Heiberg published the first issue of his review Perseus, Journal for the Speculative Idea in June of 1837 as a part of his long-standing campaign to convert his Golden Age contemporaries to G.W.F. Hegel's philosophical system. The journal was created in large part as a result of a dispute that Heiberg had with the editorial board of the prestigious Maanedsskrift for Litteratur about an article that he had submitted. Feeling unfairly persecuted, Heiberg retracted his submission and resolved to found a new philosophical journal of his own, in which his controversial piece could be published. Thus Perseus was born. In his prefatory address to the journal's readers, Heiberg calls upon the Greek hero Perseus to be the champion for the cause of Hegelian idealism and to do battle with the pernicious Medusa of realism and empiricism. Although Heiberg's Hegelian review only appeared in two issues in 1837 and 1838, it was widely read and discussed among Danish students and intellectuals of the time. It was reviewed at length by the philosopher Frederik Christian Sibbern and satirized by Søren Kierkegaard in Prefaces. There can be no doubt that Heiberg's Perseus represents a landmark in Golden Age culture.

Kierkegaard s Writings II Volume 2

The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures Søren Kierkegaard. eternity (cont.) God and, 374; is invisible, 73; man and, 396; and mythology, 428; and substance, 576; and temporal, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  II  Volume 2

A work that "not only treats of irony but is irony," wrote a contemporary reviewer of The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates. Presented here with Kierkegaard's notes of the celebrated Berlin lectures on "positive philosophy" by F.W.J. Schelling, the book is a seedbed of Kierkegaard's subsequent work, both stylistically and thematically. Part One concentrates on Socrates, the master ironist, as interpreted by Xenophon, Plato, and Aristophanes, with a word on Hegel and Hegelian categories. Part Two is a more synoptic discussion of the concept of irony in Kierkegaard's categories, with examples from other philosophers and with particular attention given to A. W. Schlegel's novel Lucinde as an epitome of romantic irony. The Concept of Irony and the Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures belong to the momentous year 1841, which included not only the completion of Kierkegaard's university work and his sojourn in Berlin, but also the end of his engagement to Regine Olsen and the initial writing of Either/Or.

Pro Ecclesia Vol 16 N3

Regarding the first, I argue that Hamann provided Kierkegaard with the initial inspiration for Fear and Trembling (as the work's motto sug— gests). Regarding the second, I discuss how Hamann is a source both for Kierkegaard's ...

Pro Ecclesia Vol 16 N3

Pro Ecclesia is a quarterly journal of theology published by the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology. It seeks to give contemporary expression to the one apostolic faith and its classic traditions, working for and manifesting the church's unity by research, theological construction, and free exchange of opinion. Members of its advisory council represent communities committed to the authority of Holy Scripture, ecumenical dogmatic teaching and the structural continuity of the church, and are themselves dedicated to maintaining and invigorating these commitments. The journal publishes biblical, liturgical, historical and doctrinal articles that promote or illumine its purposes. Ways to subscribe: Call toll-free: 800-273-2223 Email: [email protected] For back-issues, please contact [email protected] Editorial inquiries: Joseph Mangina, [email protected] Submissions should be sent by email attachment in Microsoft Word, double-spaced, with identifying marks removed for the purposes of blind peer review. Book review inquiries: Chad Pecknold, [email protected] Advertising inquiries: Charles Roth, Jr., [email protected] Subscription inquiries: [email protected] ISSN: 1063-8512

Kierkegaard s Writings XIII Volume 13

The Corsair Affair and Articles Related to the Writings Søren Kierkegaard ... The book may be called a monster, for it is impressive by its very mass . . .” 41. ... Two Upbuilding Discourses, by S. Kierkegaard, appeared May 16, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XIII  Volume 13

The Corsair affair has been called the "most renowned controversy in Danish literary history." At the center is Søren Kierkegaard, whose pseudonymous Stages on Life's Way occasioned a frivolous and dishonorable review by Peder Ludvig Møller. Møller was associated with The Corsair, a publication notorious for gossip and caricature. The editor was Meïr Goldschmidt, an acquaintance of Kierkegaard's and an admirer of his early work. Kierkegaard struck back at not only Møller and Goldschmidt but at the paper as a whole. The present volume contains all of the documents relevant to this dispute, plus a historical introduction that recapitulates the sequence of events surrounding the controversy. Parts I (Article) and II (Addenda) contain articles both signed by and attributed to Kierkegaard in response to the affair. A supplement includes writings pertaining to the Corsair affair by Goldschmidt and Møller, as well as unpublished pieces by Kierkegaard from his journals and papers. Although the immediate occasion was literary, for Kierkegaard the issues as well as the consequences were ethical, social, philosophical, and religious. Howard Hong argues that the most important consequence was wholly unexpected and unintended: the second phase of Kierkegaard's authorship.

Kierkegaard s Writings IX Volume 9

Lehmann, Peter Martin Orla, xiii, 80, 186, 196 lie: Desdemona's, 198 literature: Danish, 115–16; and journalism, ... 181 Soren Kierkegaards Papirer, xvi Soren Kierkegaards samlede Vaprker, xvi, 195 Stages on Life's Way, x, xi, 186, 187, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  IX  Volume 9

Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety and its companion--published on the same day--the comically ironic Prefaces. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard's final collision with Danish Christendom. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. Writing Sampler considers the same themes taken up in Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Although Writing Sampler remained unpublished during his lifetime, it is presented here as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces.

Selected Works Cornelio Fabro Volume 2 Selected Articles on S ren Kierkegaard

16 volumes. Copenhagen: Gyldendal, 1909–1978. References followed by volume (I–XVI), tome (if any) in superscript, section (A, B, C), and number. Søren Kierkegaards Skrifter. Edited by N. J. Cappelørn et al. 28 volumes.

Selected Works Cornelio Fabro  Volume 2  Selected Articles on S  ren Kierkegaard

Selected Works of Cornelio Fabro Volume 2: Selected Articles on Søren Kierkegaard, is the second volume of the English Selected Works of Cornelio Fabro. In addition to an introduction by Dr. Joshua Furnal, of Radboud University Nijmegen, this volume includes the following articles, published together for the first time: - “Actuality (Reality).” In Concepts and Alternatives in Kierkegaard. Bibliotheca Kierkegaardiana, edited by Niels Thulstrup and Marie Mikulová Thulstrup, vol. 3, 111–113. Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel, 1980. - “Analogy.” In Theological Concepts in Kierkegaard. Bibliotheca Kierkegaardiana, edited by Niels Thulstrup and Marie Mikulová Thulstrup, vol. 5, 96–98. Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel, 1980. - “Aristotle and Aristotelianism.” In Kierkegaard and Great Traditions. Bibliotheca Kierkegaardiana, edited by Niels Thulstrup and Marie Mikulová Thulstrup, vol. 6, 27–53. Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel, 1981. Originally published as “La πίστις aristotelica nell’opera di S. Kierkegaard,” Proteus. Rivista di Filosofia 5, no. 13 (January-April 1974): 3–24. - “Atheism.” In Theological Concepts in Kierkegaard. Bibliotheca Kierkegaardiana, edited by Niels Thulstrup and Marie Mikulová Thulstrup, vol. 5, 270–272. Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel, 1980. -“Edification.” In Some of Kierkegaard’s Main Categories. Bibliotheca Kierkegaardiana, edited by Niels Thulstrup and Marie Mikulová Thulstrup, vol. 16, 154–163. Copenhagen: C. A. Reitzel, 1988. - “Faith and Reason in Kierkegaard’s Dialectic.” Translated by J. B. Mondin. In A Kierkegaard Critique, edited by Howard A. Johnson and Niels Thulstrup, 156–206. New York: Harper and Brothers, 1962. Originally published as “Fede e ragione nella dialettica di Kierkegaard,” in Dall’essere all’esistente (Brescia: Morcelliana, 1957), 127–185. - “The ‘Subjectivity of Truth’ and the Interpretation of Kierkegaard.” Kierkegaard-Studiet, no. 1 (January 1964): 35–43. There are also three further articles, bringing this volume to a total of 10 articles.

Kierkegaard s Writings XII Volume II

VIII 109-416); Works of Love (September 29, 1847), KW XVI (SV IX); Christian Discourses (April 26, 1848), KWXVII (SVX 3–317). 138. See note 135 above. 139. Two Upbuilding Discourses (May 16, 1843), in Eighteen Discourses, pp.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XII  Volume II

In Philosophical Fragments the pseudonymous author Johannes Climacus explored the question: What is required in order to go beyond Socratic recollection of eternal ideas already possessed by the learner? Written as an afterword to this work, Concluding Unscientific Postscript is on one level a philosophical jest, yet on another it is Climacus's characterization of the subjective thinker's relation to the truth of Christianity. At once ironic, humorous, and polemical, this work takes on the "unscientific" form of a mimical-pathetical-dialectical compilation of ideas. Whereas the movement in the earlier pseudonymous writings is away from the aesthetic, the movement in Postscript is away from speculative thought. Kierkegaard intended Postscript to be his concluding work as an author. The subsequent "second authorship" after The Corsair Affair made Postscript the turning point in the entire authorship. Part One of the text volume examines the truth of Christianity as an objective issue, Part Two the subjective issue of what is involved for the individual in becoming a Christian, and the volume ends with an addendum in which Kierkegaard acknowledges and explains his relation to the pseudonymous authors and their writings. The second volume contains the scholarly apparatus, including a key to references and selected entries from Kierkegaard's journals and papers.

Kierkegaard s Writings XI Volume 11

Barea, Ilsa, Wonderful History of Peter Schlemihl, 725 Barfod, Hans Peter, and Hermann Gottsched, Afşaren Kierkegaards Efterladte Papirer, 713 bargain, see analogy Barnes, Jonathan, Complete Works of Aristotle, 684 Basore, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XI  Volume 11

Stages on Life's Way, the sequel to Either/Or, is an intensely poetic example of Kierkegaard's vision of the three stages, or spheres, of existence: the esthetic, the ethical, and the religious. With characteristic love for mystification, he presents the work as a bundle of documents fallen by chance into the hands of "Hilarius Bookbinder," who prepared them for printing. The book begins with a banquet scene patterned on Plato's Symposium. (George Brandes maintained that "one must recognize with amazement that it holds its own in this comparison.") Next is a discourse by "Judge William" in praise of marriage "in answer to objections." The remainder of the volume, almost two-thirds of the whole, is the diary of a young man, discovered by "Frater Taciturnus," who was deeply in love but felt compelled to break his engagement. The work closes with a letter to the reader from Taciturnus on the three "existence-spheres" represented by the three parts of the book. Stages on Life's Way not only repeats themes, characters, and pseudonymous authors of the earlier works but also goes beyond them and points to further development of central ideas in Concluding Unscientific Postscript. ?

Kierkegaard s Writings XVIII Volume 18

Without Authority Søren Kierkegaard ... 294; 3:2, 298; 3:17, 294; 3:19, 294; 4:16, 293; 6:15, 291; 6:68, 293,294; 8:46, 295; 8:47–51, 102; 10:30, 291; 11:4, 294; 12:4–6, 294; 12:47, 294; 14:6, 295; 15:13, 294; 18:36, 291; 19:19–22, 291; ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XVIII  Volume 18

"Without authority," a phrase Kierkegaard repeatedly applied to himself and his writings, is an appropriate title for this volume of five short works that in various ways deal with the concept and practice of authority. The Lily in the Field and the Bird of the Air contemplates the teaching authority of these creatures based on three different passages in the Gospels. The first of Two Ethical-Religious Essays mediates on the ethics of Jesus' martyrdom; the second contrasts the authority of the genius with that of the apostle. The remaining works--Three Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1849), An Upbuilding Discourse (1850), and Two Discourses at the Communion on Fridays (1851)--are meditations on sin, forgiveness, and the power of love.

Kierkegaard s Writings I Volume 1

Early Polemical Writings Søren Kierkegaard ... 70, 73; manyangled, 82; poet and, 82-83, 92 Peter the Hermit, 241 Petersen, Frederik Christian, 279 Petersen, Teddy, Kierkegaards polemiske debut, xi, xii, xv, xvi, xvii, xviii, xix., xxi., ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  I  Volume 1

Early Polemical Writings covers the young Kierkegaard's works from 1834 through 1838. His authorship begins, as it was destined to end, with polemic. Kierkegaard's first published article touches on the theme of women's emancipation, and the other articles from his student years deal with freedom of the press. Modern readers can see the seeds of Kierkegaard's future career these early pieces. In "From the Papers of One Still Living," his review of Hans Christian Andersen's novel Only a Fiddler, Kierkegaard rejects the notion that environment is decisive in determining the fate of genius. He also puts forward his belief that each person needs a life-view or life for which and by which to live, a thought he explores further in the comic play The Battle between the Old and the New Soap-Cellars.

Volume 19 Tome I Kierkegaard Bibliography

16, no. 120, May 26, 1855, pp. 501–2. Øieblikket, nr. 2 [The Moment, no. 2], Copenhagen: C.A. Reitzel 1855. ... S. Kierkegaards Bladartikler, med Bilag [S. Kierkegaard's Newspaper Articles, including Supplements], ed. by Rasmus Nielsen, ...

Volume 19  Tome I  Kierkegaard Bibliography

The long tradition of Kierkegaard studies has made it impossible for individual scholars to have a complete overview of the vast field of Kierkegaard research. The large and ever increasing number of publications on Kierkegaard in the languages of the world can be simply bewildering even for experienced scholars. The present work constitutes a systematic bibliography which aims to help students and researchers navigate the seemingly endless mass of publications. The volume is divided into two large sections. Part I, which covers Tomes I-V, is dedicated to individual bibliographies organized according to specific language. This includes extensive bibliographies of works on Kierkegaard in some 41 different languages. Part II, which covers Tomes VI-VII, is dedicated to shorter, individual bibliographies organized according to specific figures who are in some way relevant for Kierkegaard. The goal has been to create the most exhaustive bibliography of Kierkegaard literature possible, and thus the bibliography is not limited to any specific time period but instead spans the entire history of Kierkegaard studies.

Volume 6 Tome III Kierkegaard and His German Contemporaries Literature and Aesthetics

16, p. 490; Jub., vol. 20, p. 186; Miscellaneous Writings of G.W.F. Hegel, op. cit., p. ... 278: “It was against this judging and denouncing conduct on the part of Friedrich Schlegel that Hegel declaims in particular (Werke, XVI, p.

Volume 6  Tome III  Kierkegaard and His German Contemporaries   Literature and Aesthetics

This volume explores in detail Kierkegaard's various relations to his German contemporaries. Kierkegaard read German fluently and made extensive use of the writings of German-speaking authors. It can certainly be argued that, apart from his contemporary Danish sources, the German sources were probably the most important in the development of his thought generally. The volume has been divided into three tomes reflecting Kierkegaard's main areas of interest with regard to the German-speaking sources, namely, philosophy, theology and a more loosely conceived category, which has here been designated "literature and aesthetics." This third tome is dedicated to the German literary sources that were significant for Kierkegaard; in particular the work of authors from German Classicism and Romanticism. Important forerunners for many of Kierkegaard's literary motifs and characters can be found in the German literature of the day. His use of pseudonyms and his interest in irony were both profoundly influenced by German Romanticism. This volume demonstrates the extent to which Kierkegaard's views of criticism and aesthetics were decisively shaped by the work of German authors.

Kierkegaard s Writings VIII Volume 8

mood, 14; unable to deal with sin, 16, 21, 182 scientist, 51, 185 “The Seducer's Diary,” 189, 191 seduction, 43, 47, 55, ... consciousness self-deception, 139, 160 self-examination, 185,247 selfishness, 61, 77-79 self-knowledge, xv-xvi.

Kierkegaard s Writings  VIII  Volume 8

This edition replaces the earlier translation by Walter Lowrie that appeared under the title The Concept of Dread. Along with The Sickness unto Death, the work reflects from a psychological point of view Søren Kierkegaard's longstanding concern with the Socratic maxim, "Know yourself." His ontological view of the self as a synthesis of body, soul, and spirit has influenced philosophers such as Heidegger and Sartre, theologians such as Jaspers and Tillich, and psychologists such as Rollo May. In The Concept of Anxiety, Kierkegaard describes the nature and forms of anxiety, placing the domain of anxiety within the mental-emotional states of human existence that precede the qualitative leap of faith to the spiritual state of Christianity. It is through anxiety that the self becomes aware of its dialectical relation between the finite and the infinite, the temporal and the eternal.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXIV Volume 24

The Book on Adler Søren Kierkegaard. KIERKEGAARD, SoREN AABYE (cont.) Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments, viii., ix, x, xi, xii, xvi, 38, 113,354, 355, 357, 360, 361, 363, 364, 370, 374, 375, 376; ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXIV  Volume 24

Kierkegaard was driven to write The Book on Adler after news spread that a Danish pastor, Adolph P. Adler, claimed to have experienced a revelation in which Christ dictated a new doctrine. Like many others, Kierkegaard was intrigued by Adler--but for different reasons than most. Over the eight years during which Kierkegaard worked on the manuscript, the phenomenon of Adler became a concern secondary to the larger question of authority. Kierkegaard revised the manuscript many times, and published a segment of it as "The Difference between a Genius and an Apostle" in Two Ethical-Religious Essays, but did not publish the work as a whole before his death. The latest integral version of The Book on Adler is included here, along with excerpts from the earlier drafts and a sampling of writing by Adler himself.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXII Volume 22

Brandt, F.: Kierkegaard og Pengene, 322 Brandt, Sebastian: Narrenschiff, 316 Brazil, 245 Brorson, Hans Adolph: “Op al den ... xx, review of On My Work, xx; “To Skrifter af S. Kierkegaard paany fremdragne,” xxi bookbinder, 207 boredom, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXII  Volume 22

As a spiritual autobiography, Kierkegaard's The Point of View for My Work as an Author stands among such great works as Augustine's Confessions and Newman's Apologia pro Vita Sua. Yet Point of View is neither a confession nor a defense; it is an author's story of a lifetime of writing, his understanding of the maze of greatly varied works that make up his oeuvre. Upon the imminent publication of the second edition of Either/Or, Kierkegaard again intended to cease writing. Now was the time for a direct "report to history" on the authorship as a whole. In addition to Point of View, which was published posthumously, the present volume also contains On My Work as an Author, a contemporary substitute, and the companion piece Armed Neutrality.