Kierkegaard s Writings XXIV Volume 24

Kierkegaard was driven to write The Book on Adler after news spread that a Danish pastor, Adolph P. Adler, claimed to have experienced a revelation in which Christ dictated a new doctrine.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXIV  Volume 24

Kierkegaard was driven to write The Book on Adler after news spread that a Danish pastor, Adolph P. Adler, claimed to have experienced a revelation in which Christ dictated a new doctrine. Like many others, Kierkegaard was intrigued by Adler--but for different reasons than most. Over the eight years during which Kierkegaard worked on the manuscript, the phenomenon of Adler became a concern secondary to the larger question of authority. Kierkegaard revised the manuscript many times, and published a segment of it as "The Difference between a Genius and an Apostle" in Two Ethical-Religious Essays, but did not publish the work as a whole before his death. The latest integral version of The Book on Adler is included here, along with excerpts from the earlier drafts and a sampling of writing by Adler himself.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXIV Volume 24

KEY TO REFERENCES Marginal references alongside the main text and Supplement are to volume and page [VII* B235 100 in Soren Kierkegaards Papirer, I-XI° (note the differentiating letter A, B, or C, used only in references to the Papirer) ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXIV  Volume 24

Kierkegaard was driven to write The Book on Adler after news spread that a Danish pastor, Adolph P. Adler, claimed to have experienced a revelation in which Christ dictated a new doctrine. Like many others, Kierkegaard was intrigued by Adler--but for different reasons than most. Over the eight years during which Kierkegaard worked on the manuscript, the phenomenon of Adler became a concern secondary to the larger question of authority. Kierkegaard revised the manuscript many times, and published a segment of it as "The Difference between a Genius and an Apostle" in Two Ethical-Religious Essays, but did not publish the work as a whole before his death. The latest integral version of The Book on Adler is included here, along with excerpts from the earlier drafts and a sampling of writing by Adler himself.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXVI Volume 26

217; and life-view, XII.1:[627); and literary admiration, XII.1: 6–8; lyrical, XXIV:188,279; and Nemesis, ... 309; religious: approach of, XXII:43–44, 47, 53; —as polemical, XXII:67–68; —Kierkegaard as, XXII:86; and reviewer(s), I:65, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXVI  Volume 26

The final volume of Princeton's Kierkegaard's Writings series, the Cumulative Index provides wide-ranging navigation to the preceding twenty-five volumes. Composed of over 90,000 entries, the Cumulative Index offers access to Kierkegaard's complex authorship and the extraordinary range of subjects he addressed in his writing. Covering the series' historical introductions, primary works, supplementary material (journal entries), and footnotes, the Cumulative Index provides a comprehensive entryway to more than 11,000 pages of text. Readers are able to survey via extended entries Kierkegaard's dual authorship, pseudonymous and signed; his numerous biblical allusions; his references to Christianity, God, and love; and his frequent use of analogies. A cumulative collation of the extensive supplementary material is also included, giving researchers and avid readers the opportunity to cross-reference Kierkegaard's Writings with his journals and papers published elsewhere in both English and Danish.

Kierkegaard s Writings I Volume 1

Kantian(s): and Hegelians, 5 Kieler Korrespondent, 45 Kierkegaard, Ane Sørensdatter Lund (mother), xi-xiii, ... xi-xiii, xix Kierkegaard, Maren Kristine (sister), xii-xiii Kierkegaard, Michael Pedersen (father), xiii, xxiv Kierkegaard, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  I  Volume 1

Early Polemical Writings covers the young Kierkegaard's works from 1834 through 1838. His authorship begins, as it was destined to end, with polemic. Kierkegaard's first published article touches on the theme of women's emancipation, and the other articles from his student years deal with freedom of the press. Modern readers can see the seeds of Kierkegaard's future career these early pieces. In "From the Papers of One Still Living," his review of Hans Christian Andersen's novel Only a Fiddler, Kierkegaard rejects the notion that environment is decisive in determining the fate of genius. He also puts forward his belief that each person needs a life-view or life for which and by which to live, a thought he explores further in the comic play The Battle between the Old and the New Soap-Cellars.

Ethics Love and Faith in Kierkegaard

XI in Kierkegaard's Writings, pp. 199–200. SKS, vol. 6 (1999), pp. 187–188. 10. The German edition is from 1833. ... SKS, vol. 3 (1997), p. 198. 16. See The Book on Adler, ed. and trans. Howard V. Hong and Edna H. Hong, vol. XXIV in ...

Ethics  Love  and Faith in Kierkegaard

Ethics, Love, and Faith in Kierkegaard collects essays from 13 leading scholars that center on key themes that characterize Kierkegaard's philosophy of religion. With their unique focus on notions of the self, views on the command to love one's neighbor, thoughts on melancholy and despair, and the articulation of religious vision, the essays in this volume cover the breadth and depth of Kierkegaard's philosophical and religious writings. Poised at the intersection of Kierkegaard's moral psychology and its religious significance, they offer vivid testimony to the ongoing power of his unique and fervent religious spirit. Students and scholars alike will find new light shed on questions that define Kierkegaard's philosophy and religion today.

Kierkegaard s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered

KIERKEGAARD'S WRITINGS A = The Book on Adler , translated by Howard V. Hong and Edna H. Hong . Princeton , New Jersey : Princeton University Press 1998. KW vol . 24 . ASKB = Auktionsprotokol over Søren Kierkegaards Bogsamling , edited ...

Kierkegaard s Relations to Hegel Reconsidered

A major re-evaluation of the complex relations between the philosophies of Kierkegaard and Hegel.

Pro Ecclesia Vol 24 N4

The second is also naturally philanthropic but is, at least for a time, so burdened with personal distress, that his natural ... For, “the very mark of Christian love and its distinguishing characteristic is this,” Kierkegaard writes, ...

Pro Ecclesia Vol 24 N4

Pro Ecclesia is a quarterly journal of theology published by the Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology.

Kierkegaard s Writings XII Volume II

Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments Søren Kierkegaard ... 24. Holger the Dane is a Danish folk hero celebrated particularly in late medieval poetry beginning with the French chivalric poetry about Ogier le ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XII  Volume II

In Philosophical Fragments the pseudonymous author Johannes Climacus explored the question: What is required in order to go beyond Socratic recollection of eternal ideas already possessed by the learner? Written as an afterword to this work, Concluding Unscientific Postscript is on one level a philosophical jest, yet on another it is Climacus's characterization of the subjective thinker's relation to the truth of Christianity. At once ironic, humorous, and polemical, this work takes on the "unscientific" form of a mimical-pathetical-dialectical compilation of ideas. Whereas the movement in the earlier pseudonymous writings is away from the aesthetic, the movement in Postscript is away from speculative thought. Kierkegaard intended Postscript to be his concluding work as an author. The subsequent "second authorship" after The Corsair Affair made Postscript the turning point in the entire authorship. Part One of the text volume examines the truth of Christianity as an objective issue, Part Two the subjective issue of what is involved for the individual in becoming a Christian, and the volume ends with an addendum in which Kierkegaard acknowledges and explains his relation to the pseudonymous authors and their writings. The second volume contains the scholarly apparatus, including a key to references and selected entries from Kierkegaard's journals and papers.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXIII Volume 23

The Moment and Late Writings Søren Kierkegaard. abolition: of Christianity, 160–61, 188, 237–42; of imitation, 412 Abraham; and Isaac, xx accommodation: cultural, ix, xvi, 168; and Martensen, 403 account, unsettled, 81 actor(s), 404–05; ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXIII  Volume 23

Kierkegaard, a poet of ideals and practitioner of the indirect method, also had a direct and polemical side. He revealed this in several writings throughout his career, culminating in The Moment, his attack against the established ecclesiastical order. Kierkegaard was moved to criticize the church by his differences with Bishop Mynster, Primate of the Church of Denmark. Although Mynster saw in Kierkegaard a complement to himself and his outlook, Kierkegaard challenged Mynster to acknowledge the emptying and estheticizing of Christianity that had occurred in modern Christendom. For three years Kierkegaard was silent, waiting. When Mynster died, he was memorialized as "an authentic truth-witness" in the "holy chain of truth-witnesses that stretches through the ages from the days of the apostles." This struck Kierkegaard as blasphemous and inspired him to write a series of articles in Fædrelandet, which he followed with ten numbers of the pamphlet The Moment. This volume includes the articles from Fædrelandet, all numbers of The Moment, and several other late pieces of Kierkegaard's writing.

Kierkegaard s Writings II Volume 2

The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates/Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures Søren Kierkegaard ... 43; and personality, 29; romantic, 288; sacrifice for, 26; Schlegel on, 286; and sexuality, 42; Socrates on, 24, 45, ...

Kierkegaard s Writings  II  Volume 2

A work that "not only treats of irony but is irony," wrote a contemporary reviewer of The Concept of Irony, with Continual Reference to Socrates. Presented here with Kierkegaard's notes of the celebrated Berlin lectures on "positive philosophy" by F.W.J. Schelling, the book is a seedbed of Kierkegaard's subsequent work, both stylistically and thematically. Part One concentrates on Socrates, the master ironist, as interpreted by Xenophon, Plato, and Aristophanes, with a word on Hegel and Hegelian categories. Part Two is a more synoptic discussion of the concept of irony in Kierkegaard's categories, with examples from other philosophers and with particular attention given to A. W. Schlegel's novel Lucinde as an epitome of romantic irony. The Concept of Irony and the Notes of Schelling's Berlin Lectures belong to the momentous year 1841, which included not only the completion of Kierkegaard's university work and his sojourn in Berlin, but also the end of his engagement to Regine Olsen and the initial writing of Either/Or.

Kierkegaard s Writings XXII Volume 22

S. Kierkegaard June 17 The Concept of Anxiety by Vigilius Haufniensis June 17 Prefaces by Nicolaus Notabene [written: Writing ... on Imagined Occasions 1846 Pseudonymous July 24–27 May 14 May 19 1846 1847 1848 xxiv Historical Introduction.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XXII  Volume 22

As a spiritual autobiography, Kierkegaard's The Point of View for My Work as an Author stands among such great works as Augustine's Confessions and Newman's Apologia pro Vita Sua. Yet Point of View is neither a confession nor a defense; it is an author's story of a lifetime of writing, his understanding of the maze of greatly varied works that make up his oeuvre. Upon the imminent publication of the second edition of Either/Or, Kierkegaard again intended to cease writing. Now was the time for a direct "report to history" on the authorship as a whole. In addition to Point of View, which was published posthumously, the present volume also contains On My Work as an Author, a contemporary substitute, and the companion piece Armed Neutrality.

Kierkegaard s Writings IX Volume 9

Prefaces: Writing Sampler Søren Kierkegaard. WRITING SAMPLER TITLE PAGE ... 1. See Adler, KW XXIV (Pap. VII* B 235, p. 83) and JP II 2143–44 (Pap. VII' A 24–25). 2. 4. In Danish Dem is the accusative of the second-person plural pronoun.

Kierkegaard s Writings  IX  Volume 9

Prefaces was the last of four books by Søren Kierkegaard to appear within two weeks in June 1844. Three Upbuilding Discourses and Philosophical Fragments were published first, followed by The Concept of Anxiety and its companion--published on the same day--the comically ironic Prefaces. Presented as a set of prefaces without a book to follow, this work is a satire on literary life in nineteenth-century Copenhagen, a lampoon of Danish Hegelianism, and a prefiguring of Kierkegaard's final collision with Danish Christendom. Shortly after publishing Prefaces, Kierkegaard began to prepare Writing Sampler as a sequel. Writing Sampler considers the same themes taken up in Prefaces but in yet a more ironical and satirical vein. Although Writing Sampler remained unpublished during his lifetime, it is presented here as Kierkegaard originally envisioned it, in the company of Prefaces.

Volume 17 Kierkegaard s Pseudonyms

7), p. 160; pp. 175–7. greene, robert, The Art of Seduction, new york: viking 2001, p. xxiv; p. 24; p. 31; pp. 169–72; pp. 179–82; p. ... Kennedy, thomas e., “the secret Life of Kierkegaard's Lover,” Literary Review, vol. 45, no.

Volume 17  Kierkegaard s Pseudonyms

One of the elements that many readers admire in Kierkegaard’s skill as a writer is his ability to create different voices and perspectives in his works. Instead of unilaterally presenting clear-cut doctrines and theses, he confronts the reader with a range of personalities and figures who all espouse different views. One important aspect of this play of perspectives is Kierkegaard’s controversial use of pseudonyms. The present volume is dedicated to exploring the different pseudonyms and authorial voices in Kierkegaard’s writing. The articles featured here try to explore each pseudonymous author as a literary figure and to explain what kind of a person is at issue in each of the pseudonymous works. The hope is that by taking seriously each of these figures as individuals, we will be able to gain new insights into the texts which they are ostensibly responsible for.

Kierkegaard s Writings XIII Volume 13

The Corsair Affair and Articles Related to the Writings Søren Kierkegaard ... Knud Christian, 233, 305 Nielsen, Rasmus, 5-6, 8, 271, 272 Noah's flood, 84 Nord og Syd, xxiv-xxvi, xliv, 152, 233, 280, 296 number, the numerical, 56, 261.

Kierkegaard s Writings  XIII  Volume 13

The Corsair affair has been called the "most renowned controversy in Danish literary history." At the center is Søren Kierkegaard, whose pseudonymous Stages on Life's Way occasioned a frivolous and dishonorable review by Peder Ludvig Møller. Møller was associated with The Corsair, a publication notorious for gossip and caricature. The editor was Meïr Goldschmidt, an acquaintance of Kierkegaard's and an admirer of his early work. Kierkegaard struck back at not only Møller and Goldschmidt but at the paper as a whole. The present volume contains all of the documents relevant to this dispute, plus a historical introduction that recapitulates the sequence of events surrounding the controversy. Parts I (Article) and II (Addenda) contain articles both signed by and attributed to Kierkegaard in response to the affair. A supplement includes writings pertaining to the Corsair affair by Goldschmidt and Møller, as well as unpublished pieces by Kierkegaard from his journals and papers. Although the immediate occasion was literary, for Kierkegaard the issues as well as the consequences were ethical, social, philosophical, and religious. Howard Hong argues that the most important consequence was wholly unexpected and unintended: the second phase of Kierkegaard's authorship.

Volume 17 Kierkegaard s Pseudonyms

himself might be early attempts by Kierkegaard at a strategy of authorship that is at every turn bent on the seduction of ... Greene, Robert, The Art of Seduction, New York: Viking 2001, p. xxiv; p. 24; p. 31; pp. 169¥72; pp. 179¥82; p.

Volume 17  Kierkegaard s Pseudonyms

One of the elements that many readers admire in Kierkegaard’s skill as a writer is his ability to create different voices and perspectives in his works. Instead of unilaterally presenting clear-cut doctrines and theses, he confronts the reader with a range of personalities and figures who all espouse different views. One important aspect of this play of perspectives is Kierkegaard’s controversial use of pseudonyms. The present volume is dedicated to exploring the different pseudonyms and authorial voices in Kierkegaard’s writing. The articles featured here try to explore each pseudonymous author as a literary figure and to explain what kind of a person is at issue in each of the pseudonymous works. The hope is that by taking seriously each of these figures as individuals, we will be able to gain new insights into the texts which they are ostensibly responsible for.

S ren Kierkegaard and His Critics

S  ren Kierkegaard and His Critics

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The Germanic Review

In 1892 E. Lorentz published a small book entitled Über die sogenannten aesthetischen Werke Sören Kierkegaards : Versuch einer ... 70 Vol . XXIV , 24 ff . 71 Vol . XIV , 372 ff . to me . Lukács , " Das Zerschellen der Form am Leben ...

The Germanic Review


Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks Journals AA DD

Søren Kierkegaard, Bruce H. Kirmmse Niels Jørgen Cappelørn, David J. Kangas, Alastair Hannay, Jon Stewart, George Pattison, Vanessa Rumble ... The reference here as later ( → 125,7 ) is to the 4th novella in the 2nd part , i.e. , vol .

Kierkegaard s Journals and Notebooks  Journals AA DD

"Originally published [in Danish] under the titles Sren Kierkegaards Skrifter ... English translation copyright 2007 by the Sren Kierkegaard Research Centre Foundation, Copenhagen, and the Howard and Edna Hong Kierkegaard Library, St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota."--T.p. verso.

Kierkegaard and the Roman World

In addition to his historical writings , Nepos is also said to have been a publisher . He died sometime around 24 BC , although the exact date is uncertain . Pliny the Elder mentions merely that he died under the reign of Augustus .

Kierkegaard and the Roman World

While Kierkegaard's use of the Greek authors, particularly Plato and Aristotle, has attracted considerable attention over the years, his use of the Roman authors has, by contrast, remained sadly neglected. This neglect is somewhat surprising given the fact that Kierkegaard was extremely well read in Latin from his early youth when he attended the Borgerdyd School in Copenhagen. Kierkegaard's interest in the Roman authors is perhaps best evidenced by his book collection. In his private library he had a long list of Latin titles and Danish translations of the standard Roman authors in any number of different genres. His extensive and frequent use of writers such as Cicero, Horace, Terence, Seneca, Suetonius and Ovid clearly warrants placing them in the select group of his major sources.The chapters in this volume demonstrate that Kierkegaard made use of the Roman sources in a number of different ways. His readings from the school seem to have stuck with him as an adult. He constantly refers to Roman authors, such as Livy, Nepos, and Suetonius for colourful stories and anecdotes. In short, the Roman authors serve to enrich any number of different aspects of Kierkegaard's authorship with respect to both content and form.

Collected Essays on Philosophy and on Judaism Some philosophers

Kierkegaard holds that “ When the righteous punishment was decreed upon Sodom and Gomora ... Abraham came forward with his ... 24 . 16 Bereshith Rabbah , XLIX . 17 Cited in Torah Shelemah , Vol . 3 , Tome 4 , p . 897 , item 131 .

Collected Essays on Philosophy and on Judaism  Some philosophers

The three volumes of Collected Essays on Philosophy and on Judaism by Marvin Fox (former President of the Association of Jewish Studies) present Fox's thoughts on the relationship between Judaism and Philosophy. Coverage in volume one is Greek Philosophy and Maimonides. In volume two, Fox covers a variety of works and ideas of well known philosophers such as Tillich and Kierkegaard. Volume three focuses on ethics as it pertains to Judaism. These select essays offer, to a new generation of scholars of Jewish thought and Philosophy, an important introduction to the field.