Kingdom of Strangers (c)

Kingdom of Strangers (c)

A novel of Lebanon featuring an unusual friendship between a Jew and an Arab. The friendship is made possible because the two met in a third country which is free from Arab-Jewish hate.

Kingdom Of Strangers

Kingdom Of Strangers

Ibrahim Al-Brehm is a respectable husband a police inspector on Jeddah's murder squad. But for the past year, he has been having an affair with a woman named Maria. One day though, she disappears. Terrified and with nowhere else to turn, Ibrahim goes to Katya, one of the few women on the force. As she ventures into Saudi Arabia's underworld, she uncovers a murder which connects Maria to a human trafficking ring. Soon Ibrahim realises that the killer is closer to home than he had ever imagined. Kingdom of Strangers is a suspenseful story of murder and deception among Saudi Arabia's shaded alleys, gleaming compounds and vast lonely deserts.

A Stranger in the Kingdom

A Novel

A Stranger in the Kingdom

This novel of murder and its aftermath in a small Vermont town in the 1950s is “reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird . . . Absorbing” (The New York Times). In Kingdom County, Vermont, the town’s new Presbyterian minister is a black man, an unsettling fact for some of the locals. When a French-Canadian woman takes refuge in his parsonage—and is subsequently murdered—suspicion immediately falls on the clergyman. While his thirteen-year-old son struggles in the shadow of the town’s accusations, and his older son, a lawyer, fights to defend him, a father finds himself on trial more for who he is than for what he might have done. “Set in northern Vermont in 1952, Mosher’s tale of racism and murder is powerful, viscerally affecting and totally contemporary in its exposure of deep-seated prejudice and intolerance . . . [A] big, old-fashioned novel.” —Publishers Weekly “A real mystery in the best and truest sense.”—Lee Smith, The New York Times Book Review A Winner of the New England Book Award

Strangers in the Kingdom

Ministering to Refugees, Migrants and the Stateless

Strangers in the Kingdom

Today’s refugee crisis has engulfed public policy and politics in countries around the world, deeply dividing communities. With increased migration many fear terrorism, crime and a dilution of their perceived national identity, while others embrace it as an inevitable reality of the globalized world in which we live. But what does the Bible have to say about migration and displacement and how refugees, migrants, and the stateless should be treated? Strangers in the Kingdom asks why God cares for the displaced, presenting biblical, theological, and missiological foundations for ministries to those who have been uprooted from their homes and all that is familiar. Rupen Das and Brent Hamoud apply their experience and expertise to provide timely answers that the Christian community is waiting to hear. Addressing the humanitarian and legal needs of the displaced is the starting point, but relief, repatriation, and resettlement programs need to help the stranger find a place to belong, a place to call home.

Familiar Stranger

An Introduction to Jesus of Nazareth

Familiar Stranger

McClymond summarizes current scholarship on Jesus and offers a clear, comprehensive, and compelling report on what is known about him here at the start of the 21st century.

Strangers to Ourselves

Strangers to Ourselves

Kristeva begins with the personal and moves outward by examining world literature and philosophy. She discusses the foreigner in Greek tragedy, in the Bible, and in the literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Enlightenment, and the twentieth century.

Soldiers and Strangers

An Ethnic History of the English Civil War

Soldiers and Strangers

Discusses the ethnic dimension of the English Civil War and the creation of the New Model Army.