Knoxville in the Civil War

When the nation went to war, so did East Tennessee. Despite a serious legal
effort by Unionists meeting in Knoxville and Greeneville in the spring of 1861 to
secede from the State of Tennessee, geography again played a major factor
making ...

Knoxville in the Civil War

Knoxville sits nestled in the extraordinary natural beauty of the Tennessee River Valley. For four long years, from 1861 to 1865, this idyllic setting was racked by some of the harshest experiences of the entire Civil War. Armies, battles, famous generals, partisans, and thousands of troops from every state North and South made their mark on the region, leaving a rich military history. However, it was the people of this genuinely American city whose divided loyalties forced families, schools, churches, financial stability, and literally all aspects of community to opposite sides of the deadly conflict. Civil war means that people, not just designated armies, become sworn enemies. In this close-knit small town, there was nowhere to hide from this vicious reality. The population of Knoxville suffered intensely, and the trauma of those punishing times can still be felt in its 21st-century cultural identity.

East Tennessee and the Civil War

A solid social, political, and military history, this book sheds light on the rise of the pro-Union and pro-Confederacy factions.

East Tennessee and the Civil War

A solid social, political, and military history, this book sheds light on the rise of the pro-Union and pro-Confederacy factions. It explores the political developments and recounts in fine detail the military maneuvering and conflicts that occurred.

The Knoxville Campaign

In this landmark book, award-winning historian Earl J. Hess fills a gap in Civil War scholarship—a timely contribution that coincides with and commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Civil War The East Tennessee campaign was an important ...

The Knoxville Campaign

“Hess’s account of the understudied Knoxville Campaign sheds new light on the generalship of James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, as well as such lesser players as Micah Jenkins and Orlando Poe. Both scholars and general readers should welcome it. The scholarship is sound, the research, superb, the writing, excellent.” —Steven E. Woodworth, author of Decision in the Heartland: The Civil War in the West In the fall and winter of 1863, Union General Ambrose Burnside and Confederate General James Longstreet vied for control of the city of Knoxville and with it the railroad that linked the Confederacy east and west. The generals and their men competed, too, for the hearts and minds of the people of East Tennessee. Often overshadowed by the fighting at Chickamauga and Chattanooga, this important campaign has never received a full scholarly treatment. In this landmark book, award-winning historian Earl J. Hess fills a gap in Civil War scholarship—a timely contribution that coincides with and commemorates the sesquicentennial of the Civil War The East Tennessee campaign was an important part of the war in the West. It brought the conflict to Knoxville in a devastating way, forcing the Union defenders to endure two weeks of siege in worsening winter conditions. The besieging Confederates suffered equally from supply shortages, while the civilian population was caught in the middle and the town itself suffered widespread destruction. The campaign culminated in the famed attack on Fort Sanders early on the morning of November 29, 1863. The bloody repulse of Longstreet’s veterans that morning contributed significantly to the unraveling of Confederate hopes in the Western theater of operations. Hess’s compelling account is filled with numerous maps and images that enhance the reader’s understanding of this vital campaign that tested the heart of East Tennessee. The author’s narrative and analysis will appeal to a broad audience, including general readers, seasoned scholars, and new students of Tennessee and Civil War history. The Knoxville Campaign will thoroughly reorient our view of the war as it played out in the mountains and valleys of East Tennessee. EARL J. HESS is Stewart W. McClelland Distinguished Professor in Humanities and an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University. He is the author of nearly twenty books, including The Civil War in the West—Victory and Defeat from the Appalachians to the Mississippi and Lincoln Memorial University and the Shaping of Appalachia.

Siege of Knoxville

Treason, murder, lust, love.

Siege of Knoxville

Tennessee, Autumn 1863. Staggered by the loss of Vicksburg in July, the Confederacy has rebounded with a crushing defeat of the Union forces at Chickamauga. The shattered Union army now lies stranded and under siege. Washington has dispatched Ulysses S.Grant to repair the situation. Grant finds that his task is made almost impossible by the presence of a rebel spy high in the Union command structure. Unfortunately, the only officer who could identify the spy is murdered before he can reveal the traitor's name. Grant assigns Captain Alphonso Clay to root-out the murderous turncoat, but Clay soon finds himself in a nest of intrigue. To identify the traitor, he must solve the murder, deal with a lethal female undercover agent bank-rolled by financier Jay Gould, and overcome a monstrous secret society that is older than the United States itself. As Longstreet's army surrounds Knoxville, Clay races the clock to keep the Army of the Ohio from being betrayed to the Confederacy. If that should happen, the Confederacy would regain all that it lost at Vicksburg, and will be well on its way to ultimate victory.

Civil War Sites

Description: Fort Dickerson was one of sixteen earthen forts and battery
emplacements built by the Federal army to protect Knoxville during the Civil War.
The fort, atop a 300-foot-high ridge across the Tennessee River from Knoxville,
was ...

Civil War Sites

This easy-to-use guide, completely revised and updated in clear, concise prose, features more than hundreds of sites in 31 states--solemn battlefields, gracious mansions, state parks, cemeteries, memorials, museums, and more. Specific directions, hours, and contact information help to plan the trip; evocative description and detailed maps help orient you when you're there. Also, boxed sidebars highlight select people and events of the Civil War.

Divided Loyalties

Divided Loyalties


Tennessee Civil War Monuments

Linderman, Gerald E. Embattled Courage: The Experience of Combat in the
American Civil War. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987. McDonough, James Lee
. Shiloh: In Hell Before Night. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1977. —
—— ...

Tennessee Civil War Monuments

Throughout Tennessee, Civil War monuments stand tall, peppering the landscape from Chattanooga to Memphis and pinpointing important events and figures within Tennessee's collective narrative. In Tennessee Civil War Monuments, Timothy S. Sedore reveals Tennessee's history-laden landscape through the lens of its many proud monuments. War monuments have been cropping up since the beginning of the commemoration movement in 1863, and Tennessee is now home to 400 memorials. Not only does Sedore provide commentary for every monument—its history and aesthetic panache—he also explores the relationships that Tennessee natives have with these historic landmarks. A detailed exploration of the monuments that enrich this Civil War landscape, Sedore's Tennessee Civil War Monuments is a guide to Tennessee's spirit and heritage.

Civil War High Commands

... Indian Hill) Charleston Harbor, S.C. Knoxville, Tenn. Campaign Lookout
Mountain, Term. (The “battle above the clouds") Charleston Harbor, S.C.
Knoxville, Tenn. Campaign ... Chronology. of. Some. Important. Civil. War. Dates.
' 186. 3. 905.

Civil War High Commands

Based on nearly five decades of research, this magisterial work is a biographical register and analysis of the people who most directly influenced the course of the Civil War, its high commanders. Numbering 3,396, they include the presidents and their cabinet members, state governors, general officers of the Union and Confederate armies (regular, provisional, volunteers, and militia), and admirals and commodores of the two navies. Civil War High Commands will become a cornerstone reference work on these personalities and the meaning of their commands, and on the Civil War itself. Errors of fact and interpretation concerning the high commanders are legion in the Civil War literature, in reference works as well as in narrative accounts. The present work brings together for the first time in one volume the most reliable facts available, drawn from more than 1,000 sources and including the most recent research. The biographical entries include complete names, birthplaces, important relatives, education, vocations, publications, military grades, wartime assignments, wounds, captures, exchanges, paroles, honors, and place of death and interment. In addition to its main component, the biographies, the volume also includes a number of essays, tables, and synopses designed to clarify previously obscure matters such as the definition of grades and ranks; the difference between commissions in regular, provisional, volunteer, and militia services; the chronology of military laws and executive decisions before, during, and after the war; and the geographical breakdown of command structures. The book is illustrated with 84 new diagrams of all the insignias used throughout the war and with 129 portraits of the most important high commanders.

The Civil War in the West

The Hard Hand of War: Union Military Policy toward Southern Civilians, 1861–
1865. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Groce, W. Todd. Mountain
Rebels: East Tennessee Confederates and the Civil War, 1860–1870. Knoxville:
 ...

The Civil War in the West

The Western theater of the Civil War, rich in agricultural resources and manpower and home to a large number of slaves, stretched 600 miles north to south and 450 miles east to west from the Appalachians to the Mississippi. If the South lost the West, there would be little hope of preserving the Confederacy. Earl J. Hess's comprehensive study of how Federal forces conquered and held the West examines the geographical difficulties of conducting campaigns in a vast land, as well as the toll irregular warfare took on soldiers and civilians alike. Hess balances a thorough knowledge of the battle lines with a deep understanding of what was happening within the occupied territories. In addition to a mastery of logistics, Union victory hinged on making use of black manpower and developing policies for controlling constant unrest while winning campaigns. Effective use of technology, superior resource management, and an aggressive confidence went hand in hand with Federal success on the battlefield. In the end, Confederates did not have the manpower, supplies, transportation potential, or leadership to counter Union initiatives in this critical arena.

The Pictorial History of the Civil War in the United States of America

SIEGE OF KNOXVILLE . - OPERATIONS ON THE COASTS OF THE CAROLINAS
AND GEORGIA . toward thering the dastreet , in 11 E left Burnside in Knoxville ,
closely besieged by Longstreet . His head - quarters were at the pleasant brick ...

The Pictorial History of the Civil War in the United States of America


A Very Violent Rebel

House, only nineteen in 1863, documents the Union occupation of Knoxville and her eventual deportation for suspected spying.

A Very Violent Rebel

House, only nineteen in 1863, documents the Union occupation of Knoxville and her eventual deportation for suspected spying.

Lincolnites and Rebels

War Department Collection of Confederate Records, NARA; Tennesseans in the
Civil War: A Military History of Confederate and Union Units with Available
Rosters of ... John Bell, 18 April 1861, McAdoo Papers; Knoxville Whig, 20 April
1861.

Lincolnites and Rebels

At the start of the Civil War, Knoxville, Tennessee, with a population of just over 4,000, was considered a prosperous metropolis little reliant on slavery. Although the surrounding countryside was predominantly Unionist in sympathy, Knoxville itself was split down the middle, with Union and Confederate supporters even holding simultaneous political rallies at opposite ends of the town's main street. Following Tennessee's secession, Knoxville soon became famous (or infamous) as a stronghold of stalwart Unionism, thanks to the efforts of a small cadre who persisted in openly denouncing the Confederacy. Throughout the course of the Civil War, Knoxville endured military occupation for all but three days, hosting Confederate troops during the first half of the conflict and Union forces throughout the remainder, with the transition punctuated by an extended siege and bloody battle during which nearly forty thousand soldiers fought over the town. In Lincolnites and Rebels, Robert Tracy McKenzie tells the story of Civil War Knoxville-a perpetually occupied, bitterly divided Southern town where neighbor fought against neighbor. Mining a treasure-trove of manuscript collections and civil and military records, McKenzie reveals the complex ways in which allegiance altered the daily routine of a town gripped in a civil war within the Civil War and explores the agonizing personal decisions that war made inescapable. Following the course of events leading up to the war, occupation by Confederate and then Union soldiers, and the troubled peace that followed the war, Lincolnites and Rebels details in microcosm the conflict and paints a complex portrait of a border state, neither wholly North nor South.

Personal Recollections of the Civil War

We continued our march through Newmarket and Strawberry Plains, reaching the
immediate vicinity of Knoxville the 28th. A word must be said right here about the
unpretending, neverflinching army mule. I do not believe we shall ever know ...

Personal Recollections of the Civil War

This volume does not claim to be a tactical, or strategic history of the campaigns of which it treats; it aims rather to be a narrative of the every-day life and experience of the private soldier in camp and field—how he lived, how he marched, how he fought and how he suffered. No sooner had some of the volunteers reached the front, and been subjected to the hardships and exposures of army life, than they fell sick, were sent to the hospital and were discharged without passing through any serious campaigns. Others were wounded early, were disabled and were never able to return to their regiments. The more fortunate passed sound and unscathed through battle after battle and campaign after campaign through the whole war. Three years of active campaigning and a year in the hospital was the allotment of the writer, who thus was in the service from the beginning to the end of the war. Contents: Preface Chapter I Learning To Be A Soldier Chapter II The North Carolina Campaign Chapter III In Virginia Under General Pope Chapter IV With Mcclellan In Maryland Chapter V The Fredericksburg Campaign Chapter VI Playing Soldier In Kentucky Chapter VII The Campaign In Tennessee Chapter VIII Home On A Re-Enlistment Furlough Chapter IX With Grant In Virginia Chapter X Life In The Hospital

Harper s Pictorial History of the Civil War

HIGLEY EBEL fon OFFICIAL MAP ILLUSTRATING THIE BIEGE OF KNOXVILLE .
About the middle of October , just after Wheeler's return from Middle On the
morning of November 14th Longstreet's advance crossed the TenTennessee ,
there ...

Harper s Pictorial History of the Civil War


Journal of the Civil War Era

1 (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2013). Hinks ... Lowe, Richard,
Greyhound Commander: Confederate General John G. Walker's History of the
Civil War West of Mississippi (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press,
2013).

Journal of the Civil War Era

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 1 March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Nicholas Marshall The Great Exaggeration: Death and the Civil War Sarah Bischoff Paulus America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58 Ted Maris-Wolf "Of Blood and Treasure": Recaptive Africans and the Politics of Slave Trade Suppression Review Essay W. Caleb McDaniel The Bonds and Boundaries of Antislavery Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Craig A. Warren Lincoln's Body: The President in Popular Films of the Sesquicentennial Notes on Contributors

The Civil War in Appalachia

As the editors of this pioneering collection of essays observe, a figurative acoustic shadow has long fallen on the study of the Civil War in Appalachia.

The Civil War in Appalachia

During the Battle of Perryville, fought in Kentucky in October 1862, participants experienced an unusual phenomenon known as an "acoustic shadow": this peculiar combination of wind and terrain muffled the sounds of the fighting in such a manner that nearby soldiers were unaware that the battle was even taking place. As the editors of this pioneering collection of essays observe, a figurative acoustic shadow has long fallen on the study of the Civil War in Appalachia. Regional stereotypes, cursory generalizations, and a neglect of geographic context have too often replaced detailed analysis and innovative interpretation.

Voices of the Civil War

Voices of the Civil War. Knoxville, Tenn.: University of Tennessee Press, 2000.
Malles, Ed, ed. Bridge Building in Wartime: Colonel Wesley Brainerd's Memoir of
the 50th New York Volunteer Engineers. Voices of the Civil War. Knoxville, Tenn.

Voices of the Civil War

"Describes first-hand accounts of the Civil War from those who lived through it"--Provided by publisher.

The Civil War The Final Year Told by Those Who Lived It

OCCUPIED KNOXVILLE: TENNESSEE, MARCH 1864 Ellen Renshaw House:
Diary, March 9–11, 19, 1864 In a referendum held ... Ellen Renshaw House had
moved with her family from Marietta, Georgia, to Knoxville shortly before the war.

The Civil War  The Final Year Told by Those Who Lived It

This final installment of the highly acclaimed four-volume series traces events from March 1864 to June 1865. It provides an incomparable portrait of a nation at war with itself, while illuminating the military and political events that brought the Union to final victory, and slavery and secession to their ultimate destruction. Here are more than 150 letters, diary entries, memoir excerpts, speeches, articles, messages, and poems by over a hundred participants and observers, both famous and unsung, including Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Ulysses S. Grant, William T. Sherman, Robert E. Lee, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Harriet Jacobs, Henry Adams, Elizabeth Keckly, and George Templeton Strong, as well as Union and Confederate soldiers; women diarists from North and South; and freed slaves. The selections include vivid and haunting firsthand accounts of legendary battles and campaigns— the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, the Atlanta campaign, the Crater, Franklin, Sherman’s march through Georgia and the Carolinas—as well as of the desperate conditions inside Andersonville prison; the sinking of the Confederate raider Alabama; the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment; and the struggles of both black and white civilians to survive the harsh and violent downfall of the Confederacy.

The Civil War and the Constitution 1859 1865 Vol 2

THE CHICKAMAUGA-CHATTANOOGA CAMPAIGN Roseerans's Advance
against Bragg, and Burnside's Advance toward Knoxville— Morgan's Bald into
Indian* and Ohio—The Capture of Morgan and His Haiders— Bragg'* Retreat to
 ...

The Civil War and the Constitution 1859 1865  Vol  2

It could be argued that the Civil War was the most influential event in the history of the United States. In The Civil War and the Constitution, political scientist John W. Burgess explores the politics, people, and sentiments of this time, and closely examines the constitutional issues of the Civil War. Volume 2 of this two-volume work covers battles in New Orleans, Kentucky, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Atlanta, and Charleston, as well as Sherman's march through Georgia. The Emancipation Proclamation is discussed in great depth, along with constitutional issues created by the military events of 1862 and 1863. JOHN W. BURGESS, Ph.D., LL.D., was a professor of political science and constitutional law and dean of the faculty of political science at Columbia University in New York.