The Vivid Air

The Vivid Air recreates the story of the famed Lafayette Escadrille, the American volunteer unit which fought with the French during World War I. A unique and elite squadron since its inception, the unit was destined for world renown even ...

The Vivid Air

The Vivid Air recreates the story of the famed Lafayette Escadrille, the American volunteer unit which fought with the French during World War I. A unique and elite squadron since its inception, the unit was destined for world renown even before it flew its first mission. Their role as the "vanguard of American volunteers" and the remarkably high caliber of the Lafayette Escadrille pilots easily set them apart and ignited the admiration of the world. The idealized glamour of aviation in the Great War, a direct consequence of the grim, heroless contest on the ground, highlighted combat flying and gave pilots a special place in the public imagination. Yet when the war came to its tragic end, widespread appreciation for crusading idealism lay buried in the ruins, and with it the true story of the Lafayette Escadrille. Philip Flammer's clear, fully documented study is the first complete scholarly account of this singular volunteer fighting unit, based on extensive research in Europe and the United States.

The Lafayette Escadrille

The most complete account of America's first volunteer participants in the Great War yet written, lavishly illustrated with both period photos and color then-and-now shots for a new generation of readers . .

The Lafayette Escadrille


SPA124 Lafayette Escadrille

This book tells the story of one of World War I's most famous squadrons, Spa. 124 - the only French squadron made up entirely of American volunteers (save for the commander and executive officer.) Organised in April 1916, the group was ...

SPA124 Lafayette Escadrille

This book tells the story of one of World War I's most famous squadrons, Spa. 124 - the only French squadron made up entirely of American volunteers (save for the commander and executive officer.) Organised in April 1916, the group was successively dubbed the Escadrille Americaine, Escadrille des Volontaires and finally the Escadrille Lafayette. Its achievements were modest, but it included several colourful characters who captured the public imagination and played a major role in gaining American sympathy for the Allied cause. When the United States finally entered the war, many Lafayette veterans helped prepare US Army Air Service and Navy pilots for combat, although a few chose to stay on with the French.

Kiffin Rockwell the Lafayette Escadrille and the Birth of the United States Air Force

This book covers Rockwell's early life and military service with the Lafayette Escadrille, the first ever American air combat unit and the precursor to the United States Air Force.

Kiffin Rockwell  the Lafayette Escadrille and the Birth of the United States Air Force

With the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, Kiffin Yates Rockwell, from Asheville, North Carolina, volunteered to fight for France. Initially serving with the French Foreign Legion as a soldier in the trenches, he soon became a founding member of the Lafayette Escadrille, a squadron made up mostly of American volunteer pilots who served under the French flag before the United States entered the war. On May 19, 1916, Rockwell became the first American pilot of the war to shoot down a German plane. He was killed during aerial combat on September 23, 1916, at age 24. This book covers Rockwell's early life and military service with the Lafayette Escadrille, the first ever American air combat unit and the precursor to the United States Air Force.

First to Fly

“The compelling story of the squadron of adventurous young American pilots who were among the first to engage in air combat.” —Tampa Bay Times In First to Fly, lauded historian Charles Bracelen Flood draws on rarely seen primary ...

First to Fly

“The compelling story of the squadron of adventurous young American pilots who were among the first to engage in air combat” (Tampa Bay Times). In First to Fly, lauded historian Charles Bracelen Flood draws on rarely seen primary sources to tell the story of the daredevil Americans of the Lafayette Escadrille, who flew in French planes, wore French uniforms, and showed the world an American brand of heroism before the United States entered the Great War. As citizens of a neutral nation from 1914 to early 1917, Americans were prohibited from serving in a foreign army, but many brave young souls soon made their way into European battle zones. It was partly from the ranks of the French Foreign Legion, and with the sponsorship of an expat American surgeon and a Vanderbilt, that the Lafayette Escadrille was formed in 1916 as the first and only all-American squadron in the French Air Service. Flying rudimentary planes, against one-in-three odds of being killed, these fearless young men gathered reconnaissance and shot down enemy aircraft, participated in the Battle of Verdun and faced off with the Red Baron, dueling across the war-torn skies like modern knights on horseback. “First to Fly shows us that there was something noble and honorable about the Escadrille, men who did not turn against their own country but put their lives up to fight for a cause, not because they had to but because it was the right thing to do.” —The Wall Street Journal

The Lafayette Escadrille

The Lafayette Escadrille


One Man s War

In the book One Man's War: The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille, Bert Hall recounts how after he was taken off the front lines due to the mumps, he was to recover in the south of France, versus Paris where he had an apartment and female ...

One Man s War

In the book One Man's War: The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille, Bert Hall recounts how after he was taken off the front lines due to the mumps, he was to recover in the south of France, versus Paris where he had an apartment and female acquaintances. At the train depot he encountered a wounded soldier who was to recover in Paris, versus the south of France where he was from. So they mutually exchanged their destination "tags", Bert gave him all his cigarettes, and then shook his hand very gently. In this he admitted that he circumvented the French Army, and that he "always did object to doing things by the numbers anyhow". He also tells of forcing a German Albatross down in French territory, and contrasts his own personal style versus his mechanic, Leon Mourreau, who also deserved credit as gunner in his early two seat Nieuport: " ... my mechanic came in for no small part of this catch, and he deserved it too. But he was a modest fellow, and not nearly as good a talker as I was. Talking up one's exploits had its advantages, even in a big caliber war. And finally, Bert Hall persistently refers to his fellow pilots and commanders in glowing and respectful terms, with rare exceptions. And if some were envious and sought to discredit his achievements, he did not reciprocate.

The Story Of The Lafayette Escadrille Told By Its Commander

Few readers interested in the subject of this book will need explanation as to its contents.”-Leonaur Print Version

The Story Of The Lafayette Escadrille Told By Its Commander

“Aces over the Western Front The Lafayette Escadrille is now a legend of early aeronautics and warfare in the air. Originally titled the Escadrille Americaine, this squadron of the French Air Force of the Great War was formed in 1916 and as it name suggests was piloted mainly by Americans who came to the Western Front to fight the battle of the skies for the Allies out of conviction—in the hope of encouraging the United States to join the fray—or simply in the spirit of adventure. The élan of this crack squadron has survived it and today its Indian chief insignia is instantly recognisable. There have been several books concerning the Lafayette Escadrille, but this one has unimpeachable credentials since its author was none other than the unit’s commander. Few readers interested in the subject of this book will need explanation as to its contents.”-Leonaur Print Version

An American for Lafayette

"The diaries and flight log of Edmond C.C. Genet contain the only known daily record of an American's service with the French Air Service and the Lafayette Escadrille in 1915-17.

An American for Lafayette

"The diaries and flight log of Edmond C.C. Genet contain the only known daily record of an American's service with the French Air Service and the Lafayette Escadrille in 1915-17. They give us an intimate and engrossing picture of life at the front during the period before the United States entered the First World War"--Jacket.

I Flew With the Lafayette Escadrille

This is the chronicle of an elite group of men, written by one of their own who survived the holocaust.

I Flew With the Lafayette Escadrille

Early in 1916, a year before the United States entered World War I, a handful of valiant Americans banded together as the Lafayette Escadrille to forge their mark in history in the skies over France. Be it for fame, adventure or patriotism, they stepped forward to meet the common enemy long before their own nation realized the true extent of the threat to world freedom. During their days with the Escadrille, some of these men met death, while others lived out the war; but each, in his own way, earned immortality for himself and the Escadrille. As long as there remains a man with a love for flying in his heart, or one who has experienced the indescribable thrill of passing along through the tranquil solitude of the firmament, the memory of the Lafayette Escadrille and of those who served it so nobly will endure. This is the chronicle of an elite group of men, written by one of their own who survived the holocaust. The vivid account of battles in the air, the flush of success over a fallen foe, the sorrow from the loss of a comrade—all of these carry the reader back across the decades to that exciting period of so long ago. In essence, one does not read this book—he lives it.

The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille

Using French aircraft, they formed a squadron that became known as the "Lafayette Escadrille." This is the story of the Lafayette Squadron, as told by its French Commander, Captain Georges Thenault. Illustrated, and with new Introduction.

The Story of the Lafayette Escadrille

When the First World War broke out in August 1914, the United States declared its neutrality. But a handful of American citizens nevertheless went to Europe and volunteered to fight for France against the Germans. Using French aircraft, they formed a squadron that became known as the "Lafayette Escadrille." This is the story of the Lafayette Squadron, as told by its French Commander, Captain Georges Thenault. Illustrated, and with new Introduction.

Air Warfare an International Encyclopedia A L

Lafayette Escadrille ace.Raoul Lufbery came into the world just like the Lafayette Escadrille itself, the product of one American parent and one French.

Air Warfare  an International Encyclopedia  A L

Written by more than 100 international scholars and experts, this encyclopedia chronicles the individuals, equipment, and drama of nearly a century of aerial combat.

The United States in the First World War

Vanderbilt contributed up to $10,000 a month to operate the Lafayette Escadrille and other French units manned by U.S. airmen. Thenault and his subordinates ...

The United States in the First World War

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Like a Thunderbolt the Lafayette Escadrille and the Advent of American Pursuit in World War I

Kiffen Yates Rockwell was an American citizen assigned to Escadrille N 124, known unofficially as l'Escadrille Americaine, and his victory was the unit's first. It was quick and impressive by contemporary standards of air combat.

Like a Thunderbolt  the Lafayette Escadrille and the Advent of American Pursuit in World War I

On the morning of May 18, 1916, a German LVG appeared in the sky over Thann in the Vosges region, near the ancient French city of Nancy. The LVG was a well-armed, two-seat observation airplane and the Vosges a quiet sector of the Western Front, in stark contrast to the merciless slaughter taking place to the north at Verdun. Normally the two airmen could expect to do their reconnaissance with little interruption, but on this day they had left luck behind. A speck appeared in the sky to the west and rapidly grew into an enemy pursuit aircraft, an avion de chasse, an agile, single-seat Nieuport. The Germans, busy at their trade, failed to see the enemy draw near. A veteran hunter or more cautious pilot might have seized the opportunity to surprise the LVG and launch an attack out of the sun or from behind a cloud, but this one approached directly, without guile. Suddenly aware of the danger, the observer seized his machine gun and began firing while the pilot turned the airplane toward the safety of the German lines. The chasse pilot closed to point blank range and, just as a collision appeared imminent, fired a quick burst, then swerved away. The encounter was over that quickly. Both the observer and pilot collapsed; the LVG rolled and plunged to earth; the Nieuport banked away leaving a plume of smoke to mark the scene of combat. French troops witnessed the brief fight and by the time the Nieuport reached its field at Luxeuil-les-Bains had confirmed the kill. It was an auspicious event. Everything about the victorious aircraft said "France" except the pilot's name. Kiffen Yates Rockwell was an American citizen assigned to Escadrille N 124, known unofficially as l'Escadrille Americaine, and his victory was the unit's first. It was quick and impressive by contemporary standards of air combat. Rockwell had engaged at incredibly close range, almost sticking his gun into the enemy cockpit, but his daring attack allowed the LVG's observer to put a hole in the Nieuport's top wing main spar. Rockwell, in turn, killed the two men with only four bullets, a marvelous feat of marksmanship. Cheering comrades lifted him from the cockpit and began a wild celebration. Atradition began with N 124's first victory. Rockwell's brother Paul, serving elsewhere in the French Army, provided a bottle of eighty-year-old bourbon. Kiffen Rockwell took the first drink, but the Escadrille set aside the rest. From then on, credit for downing an enemy aircraft earned the victorious pilot a shot from "The Bottle of Death."

Like a Thunderbolt

Like a Thunderbolt


Like A Thunderbolt The Lafayette Escadrille And The Advent Of American Pursuit In World War I Illustrated Edition

Includes 29 Illustrations The advent of an American squadron, or “escadrille,” within the French air force, the Service Aeronautique, had been far from a simple process.

Like A Thunderbolt  The Lafayette Escadrille And The Advent Of American Pursuit In World War I  Illustrated Edition

Includes 29 Illustrations The advent of an American squadron, or “escadrille,” within the French air force, the Service Aeronautique, had been far from a simple process. French leaders initially held the belief, common at the time, that the war begun in 1914 would be a short one. The potential value of American volunteers fighting for France both for propaganda purposes and for helping bring the power of the New World into the war on the side of the Allies was thus irrelevant at first. By early 1915, however, the French began to accept American volunteers and assign them to escadrilles. In early 1916, the Service Aeronautique united several of these men in an elite chasse unit, which quickly earned an enviable reputation for audacity, bravery, and élan. Success of this unit, the Lafayette Escadrille, had three consequences. First, its existence encouraged a large number of Americans, far more than needed in one escadrille, to volunteer for French aviation. These individuals, identified unofficially as members of a “Lafayette Flying Corps,” served in numerous French air units. Second, the publicity surrounding the Lafayette Escadrille contributed favorable press for the Allied cause, strengthened ties between France and the U.S., and ultimately helped prepare the U.S. to participate on the Allied side of the conflict. Third, the existence of a large body of experienced American pilots provided combat veterans for the Air Service of the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in France when the U.S. ultimately entered the war. These veterans helped instill in the U.S. Air Service the attitudes and practices of the Service Aeronautique, an infusion especially reflected in two U.S. pursuit squadrons, the 103rd Aero Squadron, made up of Lafayette Escadrille pilots, and the 94th Aero Squadron, the most famous American combat squadron of the war.

World War I

Lafayette. Escadrille ... By December 1916 the French air service changed the EA's name to Lafayette Escadrille (Lafayette Squadron [LE]), named for the ...

World War I

Alphabetically arranged entries, supplemented with maps and primary documents, provide a complete history of the First World War.

The Lafayette Flying Corps

This new book contains not only a history of the legendary Lafayette Flying Corps, but also detailed biographies of the 269 volunteer American airmen and gunners of France's Service Aeronautique who flew in sixty-six pursuit and twenty ...

The Lafayette Flying Corps

This new book contains not only a history of the legendary Lafayette Flying Corps, but also detailed biographies of the 269 volunteer American airmen and gunners of France's Service Aeronautique who flew in sixty-six pursuit and twenty-seven bomber/observation squadrons over the Western Front - also included are the thirty-eight pilots of the Escadrille Lafayette. It is an accurate and absorbing account of the lives and combat experiences of the men who later formed the nucleus of the American Expeditionary Force squadrons. This ground breaking work contains comprehensive research, including details of war casualties and survivors, and many unpublished photographs.