Language and Relation

Every language , he tells us in his definition of the “ kinship ” ( Verwandschaft ) of languages , intends pure ... But while the structure of signification of each language is determined by this language's relation to the " true ...

Language and Relation

The most recent version of the “linguistic turn,” the revolution in language theory shaped by Saussure’s structural linguistics and realized in a sweeping revision of investigations throughout the humanities and social sciences, has rushed past the most basic “fact”: that there is language. What has been lost? Almost everything of what Heidegger tried to approach under the name of “ontology” until the word proved too laden by common misapprehension to be of use. Most immediately, this is everything of language that exceeds the order of signification, together with the subject’s engagement with this “excess” that is the (non)ground of history and the material site of all relationality, beginning with that unthought that is widely termed “culture.” Language and Relation returns to this site in close readings of meditations on language by Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray, Paul Celan, Walter Benjamin, and Maurice Blanchot. It seeks to move with these authors beyond the order of signification and toward the an-archic grounds of relation (of all relations between self and other, and of relation in general), exploring the possibility for a strong link between issues in modern philosophy of language and contemporary socio-political concerns.

Language in Relation to a Unified Theory of the Structure of Human Behavior

(Language Monograph, No. 16). 1936a. “Answers to Andrade's Questions”, Language, 12.294-97. 1936b. “On Various Phonemes”, Language, 12.53–59. 1946. “Review of R. H. Stetson, Bases of Phonology”, International Journal of American ...

Language in Relation to a Unified Theory of the Structure of Human Behavior


Language and Relationship in Wordsworth s Writing

Joseph Priestley had begun to explore the relation between spoken and written language in terms of diversity and standardisation, noting that spoken language is more diverse than written.8 In A Course of Lectures on the Theory of ...

Language and Relationship in Wordsworth s Writing

William Wordsworth (1770-1850) needs little introduction as the central figure in Romantic poetry and a crucial influence in the development of poetry generally. This broad-ranging survey redefines the variety of his writing by showing how it incorporates contemporary concepts of language difference and the ways in which popular and serious literature were compared and distinguished during this period. It discusses many of Wordsworth's later poems, comparing his work with that of his regional contemporaries as well as major writers such as Scott. The key theme of relationship, both between characters within poems and between poet and reader, is explored through Wordsworth's construction of community and his use of power relationships. A serious discussion of the place of sexual feeling in his writing is also included.

Fighting Words

A study of the impact of language policies on ethnic relations in fifteen Asian and Pacific countries.

Fighting Words

A study of the impact of language policies on ethnic relations in fifteen Asian and Pacific countries.

The Relation of Writing to Spoken Language

The close relationship between a spoken language and its written variant has led to the hypothesis that the major part of the system is shared by both modes of expression. For instance, the semantic component provides the interpretation ...

The Relation of Writing to Spoken Language

This volume grew out of the workshop Writing Language, held at the Max Planck Institute, Nijmegen. The papers represent several lines of research into the intricate relation between writing and spoken language: Theoretical and computational linguists discuss the models that explain why orthographies are the way they are and the constraints that hold between writing and speaking a language; researchers in special education deal with the question of how certain aspects of orthography can be learned; and psycholinguists discuss aspects of language processing affected by variation in orthographies.

Relations of Language and Thought

Marc Marschark and Victoria S. Everhart The issue of the relation (or relations) between language and thought is one of the oldest in philosophy, and in many ways, it was the issue that led to the emergence of psychology as a separate ...

Relations of Language and Thought

The relationship of language to cognition, especially in development, is an issue that has occupied philosophers, psychologists, and linguists for centuries. In recent years, the scientific study of sign languages and deaf individuals has greatly enhanced our understanding of deafness, language, and cognition. This Counterpoints volume considers the extent to which the use of sign language might affect the course and character of cognitive development, and presents a variety of viewpoints in this debate. This volume brings the language-thought discussion into a clearer focus, both theoretically and practically, by placing it in the context of children growing up deaf and the influences of having sign language as their primary form of communication. The discussion is also sharpened by having internationally recognized contributors, such as Patricia Siple, Diane Lillo-Martin, and Ruth Campbell, with specialties in varied areas, all converging on a common interest in which each has conducted empirical research. These contributors clarify and challenge the theoretical assumptions that have driven arguments in the language-thought debate for centuries. An introduction by the editors provides a historical overview of the issues as well as a review of empirical findings that have been offered in response to questions about language-thought relations in deaf children. The final chapters are structured in the form of "live" debate, in which each contributor is given the opportunity to respond to the other perspectives presented in this volume.

Of Thoughts and Words

easy in Seneca to talk about talk and different languages, there is no direct way of capturing the idea of language as an abstract system. It would appear, then, that the mind is recognized in a way that language is not.

Of Thoughts and Words

The concept of language is an elusive one, and the concept of mind even more so. Still the relation between them is of current interest in many quarters. The purpose of the Nobel Symposium on language and mind was to establish a forum for the discussion of this fundamental relation in a creative perspective. Representatives of several fields of knowledge, arts, and research gathered in an interdisciplinary setting, focusing on five aspects: literature, general linguistics, psycholinguistics, neurology, and artificial intelligence. Contents: Literature:A Cat's Meow (J Brodsky)A Mouse's Defence. Discussion of Joseph Brodsky's Paper “A Cat's Meow” (K Espmark)Monstrous Intimacy. Of Literature as Experience. Discussion of Joseph Brodsky's Paper (J Kristeva)The Invisible Intervention. Discussion of Joseph Brodsky's Paper (P Tafdrup)Ark (P Tafdrup)Creativity and Quality. Discussion of Joseph Brodsky's Paper (A Ellegård)General Linguistics:On Language in Relation to the Evolution of Human Consciousness (M A K Halliday)Discussion of M A K Halliday's Paper (Ö Dahl)Semiosis: Language(s), Texts/Discourses, and Grammar(s). Discussion of M A K Halliday's Paper (J Sándor Petöfi)Discussion of M A K Halliday's Paper (S Öhman)Psycholinguistics:Accessing the Mind through Language (W Chafe)Minds, Modules and Evolution. Discussion of Wallace Chafe's Paper (J Aitchison)And There was Snow, Chest High, at Tuolomne Meadows. Discussion of Wallace Chafe's Paper (J Asplund)Speaking about the Inner Environment. Discussion of Wallace Chafe's Paper (P Gärdenfors)Neurology:Language and the Brain. A Look at Brain Circuitry with Functional Brain Imaging (M Raichle)Discussion of Marcus E Raichle's Paper “Language and the Brain: A Look at Brain Circuitry with Functional Brain Imaging” (A Ellegård)Language and Consciousness Ñ Neurolinguistic and Clinical Aspects. Discussion of Marcus E Raichle's Paper (D H Ingvar)Understanding Understanding? Brain Imaging and Experimental Semantics. Discussion of Marcus E Raichle's Paper (T N¿rretranders)Artificial Intelligence:Speechstuff and Thoughtstuff. Musing on the Resonances Created by Words and Phrases via the Subliminal Perception of Their Buried Parts (D R Hofstadter)Language and Mind as Topics in Natural Science. Discussion of Douglas R Hofstadter's Paper (P Kanerva)Distortions. Discussion of Douglas R Hofstadter's Paper (U Linde)IT-ism. Discussion of Douglas R Hofstadter's Paper (P Weissglas)and other papers Readership: General. Keywords:Language;Mind;Creative;GrammarKnowledge;Discourses;Brain;Imaging;Neurolinguistics;Semantics;Literature;Linguistics;Psycholinguistics;Neurology;AI;Evolution;Human Consciousness;Text;Cents

Cross Language Relations in Composition

The nine chapters comprising part 1 of the collection focus on the origins of the “English only” bias dominating U.S. composition classes and present alternative methods of teaching and research that challenge this monolingualism.

Cross Language Relations in Composition

Cross-Language Relations in Composition brings together the foremost scholars in the fields of composition, second language writing, education, and literacy studies to address the limitations of the tacit English-only policy prevalent in composition pedagogy and research and to suggest changes for the benefit of writing students and instructors throughout the United States. Recognizing the growing linguistic diversity of students and faculty, the ongoing changes in the English language as a result of globalization, and the increasingly blurred categories of native, foreign, and second language English speakers, editors Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Kei Matsuda have compiled a groundbreaking anthology of essays that contest the dominance of English monolingualism in the study and teaching of composition and encourage the pursuit of approaches that embrace multilingualism and cross-language writing as the norm for teaching and research. The nine chapters comprising part 1 of the collection focus on the origins of the “English only” bias dominating U.S. composition classes and present alternative methods of teaching and research that challenge this monolingualism. In part 2, nine composition teachers and scholars representing a variety of theoretical, institutional, and professional perspectives propose new, compelling, and concrete ways to understand and teach composition to students of a “global,” plural English, a language evolving in a multilingual world. Drawing on recent theoretical work on genre, complexity, performance and identity, as well as postcolonialism, Cross-Language Relations in Composition offers a radically new approach to composition teaching and research, one that will prove invaluable to all who teach writing in today’s multilingual college classroom.

The Acquisition of Spatial Relations in a Second Language

When the relations are equally complex and when the conceptualisation of subspaces in both languages coincide, a third factor seems to intervene, namely the availability of a form already acquired in the expression of the direction of ...

The Acquisition of Spatial Relations in a Second Language

This book is the third to appear in the SIBIL series based on results from the European Science Foundation's Additional Activity on the second language acquisition of adult immigrants. It analyses from a longitudinal and cross-linguistic perspective the acquisition of the linguistic means to express spatial relations in the target languages English, French and German. Learners' progress in the expression of spatial relations is closely followed over a period of 30 months using a wide range of oral data, and the factors determining both the specifics of individual source/target language pairings, and the general characteristics of all cases of acquisition studied, are carefully described. In particular, a basic system for the expression of spatial relations common to all learners from all language backgrounds is identified. The book is of particular significance for the field of second language acquisition in that this is the first time that results are presented in English on the acquisition of L2 means to express the basic cognitive and communicational category of space from a comparative linguistic point of view.

Language

Language


Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing

This volume provides excellent course material while it also reports on the state-of-the-art in the field.

Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing

Lexical Functions in Lexicography and Natural Language Processing is entirely devoted to the topic of Lexical Functions, which have been introduced in the framework of the Meaning-Text Theory (MTT) as a means for describing restricted lexical co-occurrence and derivational relations. It provides detailed background information, comparative studies of other known proposals for the representation of relations covered by Lexical Functions, as well as a selection of most important works done on and with Lexical Functions in lexicography and computational linguistics. This volume provides excellent course material while it also reports on the state-of-the-art in the field.

Language Relations Across The Bering Strait

each other and to Uralic, drawing Altaic languages into the picture may well prove to lie beyond the reach of normal comparative methods, as has often been argued in recent times in relation to the Ural-Altaic hypothesis itself.

Language Relations Across The Bering Strait

In building up a scenario for the arrival on the shores of Alaska of speakers of languages related to Eskimo-Aleut with genetic roots deep within Sineria, this book touches upon a number of issues in contemporary historical linguistics and archaeology. The Arctic "gateway" to the New World, by acting as a bottleneck, has allowed only small groups of mobile hunter-gatherers through during specific propitious periods, and thus provides a unique testing ground for theories about population and language movements in pre-agricultural times. Owing to the historically attested prevalence of language shifts and other contact phenomena in the region, it is arguable that the spread of genes and the spread of language have been out of step since the earliest reconstructable times, contrary to certain views of their linkage. Proposals that have been put forward in the past concerning the affiliations of Eskimo-Aleut languages are followed up in the light of recent progress in reconstructing the proto-languages concerned. Those linking Eskimo-Aleut with the Uralic languages and Yukagir are particularly promising, and reconstructions for many common elements are presented. The entire region "Great Beringia" is scoured for typological evidence in the form of anomalies and constellations of uncommon traits diagnostic of affiliation or contact. The various threads lead back to mesolithic times in south central Siberia, when speakers of a "Uralo-Siberian" mesh of related languages appears to have moved along the major waterways of Siberia. Such a scenario would acount for the present distribution of these languages and the results of their meeting with remnants of earlier linguistic waves from the Old World to the New.

The relationship between music and language

Therefore, singing is particularly well-suited to the study of the relation between language and music, the advantage being that both linguistic and musical information are merged into one acoustic signal with two salient dimensions, ...

The relationship between music and language

Traditionally, music and language have been treated as different psychological faculties. This duality is reflected in older theories about the lateralization of speech and music in that speech functions were thought to be localized on the left and music functions on the right hemisphere. But with the advent of modern brain imaging techniques and the improvement of neurophysiological measures to investigate brain functions an entirely new view on the neural and psychological underpinnings of music and speech has evolved. The main point of convergence in the findings of these new studies is that music and speech functions have many aspects in common and that several neural modules are similarly involved in speech and music. There is also emerging evidence that speech functions can benefit from music functions and vice versa. This new research field has accumulated a lot of new information and it is therefore timely to bring together the work of those researchers who have been most visible, productive, and inspiring in this field and to ask them to present their new work or provide a summary of their laboratory's work.

The Language of Interstate Relations

One ofthese points is the roleof perception in foreignpolicy analysis andits possible relation to language and cognition. The highly imagistic nature of IR discourse is discussed. One of the most basicimage perceptions ofthestate is ...

The Language of Interstate Relations

In challenging the widely held belief in the ubiquity of the personification of the political state, this book strives to de-politicize research and to de-mystify conceptual metaphor. Opposed to mainstream cognitive assumptions, it provides detailed data-driven research and one realistic solution to many of the dilemmas.

The German speaking World

Part Three explores the relationship between the German language and the nature of 'Germanness'. It concentrates on people's attitudes towards the language, the ways in which it is changing, and their views on what it represents for them.

The German speaking World

Combining text with practical exercises and discussion questions to stimulate readers, this textbook covers a wide range of sociolinguistic issues relating to the German language and its role in societies around the world.This accessible textbook offers students the opportunity to explore for themselves a wide range of sociolinguistic issues relating to the German language and its role in societies around the world. It is written for undergraduate students who have a sound practical knowledge of German but who have little or no knowledge of linguistics or sociolinguistics. It combines text with practical exercises and discussion questions to stimulate readers to think for themselves and to tackle specific problems.In Part One Patrick Stevenson invites readers to investigate and reflect on issues about the status and function of the German language in relation to its speakers and to speakers of other languages with which it comes into contact. In Part Two the focus shifts to the forms and functions of individual features of the language. This involves, for example, identifying features of regional speech forms, analysing similarities and differences between written and spoken German, or looking at the 'social meaning' underlying different forms of address. Part Three explores the relationship between the German language and the nature of 'Germanness'. It concentrates on people's attitudes towards the language, the ways in which it is changing, and their views on what it represents for them.

Cross Language Relations in Composition

I Bruce Homer -|-his collection participates in an emerging movement within composition studies representing, and responding to, changes in and changing perceptions of language(s), English(es), students, and the relations of all these ...

Cross Language Relations in Composition

Cross-Language Relations in Composition brings together the foremost scholars in the fields of composition, second language writing, education, and literacy studies to address the limitations of the tacit English-only policy prevalent in composition pedagogy and research and to suggest changes for the benefit of writing students and instructors throughout the United States. Recognizing the growing linguistic diversity of students and faculty, the ongoing changes in the English language as a result of globalization, and the increasingly blurred categories of native, foreign, and second language English speakers, editors Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Kei Matsuda have compiled a groundbreaking anthology of essays that contest the dominance of English monolingualism in the study and teaching of composition and encourage the pursuit of approaches that embrace multilingualism and cross-language writing as the norm for teaching and research. The nine chapters comprising part 1 of the collection focus on the origins of the “English only” bias dominating U.S. composition classes and present alternative methods of teaching and research that challenge this monolingualism. In part 2, nine composition teachers and scholars representing a variety of theoretical, institutional, and professional perspectives propose new, compelling, and concrete ways to understand and teach composition to students of a “global,” plural English, a language evolving in a multilingual world. Drawing on recent theoretical work on genre, complexity, performance and identity, as well as postcolonialism, Cross-Language Relations in Composition offers a radically new approach to composition teaching and research, one that will prove invaluable to all who teach writing in today’s multilingual college classroom.

Representation Relationship Between Language And Image

You never use a word in relation to itself. There is no such thing as the absolute meaning of a word. A single word is always in a relationship with the whole acquisition of language. It is part of an entire structure.

Representation  Relationship Between Language And Image

This volume discusses the relationship between a representation and its corresponding meanings.Images may be considered at three different levels: perceptual, mental and communicating. So a multidisciplinary approach is required for a full coverage of such levels. The authors come from different fields: biology, philosophy, psychology, computer science, art history.The book is subdivided into four sections: human images relate to vision and perception, philosophical images deal with the formation and interpretation of symbols, restoration images consider some strategies and results in works of art, computer images where the computer can be seen as a tool for cognition, interpretation and visualization.

Language and Bilingual Cognition

This led him to question the existence of a single ideal relation of language to reality and in precisely this sense to question also our conceptualization of a unitary reality, since its qualities would vary as a function of the ...

Language and Bilingual Cognition

This volume provides a state-of-the-art overview of the relationship between language and cognition with a focus on bilinguals, bringing together contributions from international leading figures in various disciplines . It is essential reading for researchers and postgraduate students with an interest in language and cognition, or in bilingualism and second languages.