Laramie

This is the place where the infamous Jack McCall hid from the authorities, where Teddy Roosevelt rode the range, and where Butch Cassidy was held at the Wyoming Territorial Prison.

Laramie

While it was still part of Dakota Territory, the town of Laramie was founded in 1868 with the arrival of the Union Pacific Railroad. Laramie s placement on the high plains at an elevation of 7,200 feet has not made for an easy existence, but the hardy ranching families and cowboys, with their cattle hunkered down against the winds and snow, survived in spite of their harsh surroundings and even thrived in this unique eastern Wyoming town. This is the place where the infamous Jack McCall hid from the authorities, where Teddy Roosevelt rode the range, and where Butch Cassidy was held at the Wyoming Territorial Prison. From its early, rowdy days as an end-of-the-tracks tent town on the railroad, with gambling halls and an active nightlife, through the growing-up years of mills, quarries, and local wartime heroes, to the establishment of Wyoming s only state university, Laramie s remarkable story is told here through historic photographs."

Fort Laramie

FORT LARAMIE , WYOMING Dort Laramie was one of the most important frontier
outposts of the T ' American West . Founded as ... The Images of America series
celebrates the history of neighborhoods , towns , and cities across the country .

Fort Laramie

For Laramie was one of the most important frontier outposts of the American West. Founded as the trading post Fort William in 1834, the fort became a U.S. military post in 1849. Beginning in 1841, emigrants stopped at Fort Laramie while traveling the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails. Fort Laramie served as gathering place for thousands of Native Americans and hosted the 1851 and 1868 treaty councils. When the treaties failed, the post became the staging area for campaigns that eventually led to the tribes's confinement on reservations. Fort Laramie was abandoned by the military in 1890; the buildings were auctioned and served private interests during the homestead period from 1890 to 1937. Fort Laramie was acquired by the state of Wyoming in 1937, and the fort became a unit of the National Park System in 1938. Fort Laramie National Historic Site is open daily except New Year's Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. The restoration of many structures to their historical appearance provides visitors with a glimpse of the past. Starley Talbott is a Wyoming native, freelance writer, and former newspaper reporter. This is her second book in the Images of America series. Photographs in this book are from the Fort Laramie National Historic Site, state and national archives, and the author. The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods, towns, and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title presents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. Arcadia is proud to play a part in the preservation of local heritage, making history available to all.

Chazy

"Chazy is a community project celebrating the two hundredth anniversary of the town's founding. It is a memoir that shares wonderful stories and photographs from the 1880s to the 1950s."--Back cover.

Chazy

"Chazy is a community project celebrating the two hundredth anniversary of the town's founding. It is a memoir that shares wonderful stories and photographs from the 1880s to the 1950s."--Back cover.

Goshen County

This volume details the growth of Goshen County due to the Homestead Act of 1862, an irrigation project near Hawk Springs, and veterans from World War I who were part of a second round of homesteading.

Goshen County

Either a French trapper named Goshe or the biblical Land of Goshen was responsible for the name given to Wyoming's southeast region. In 1911, the Wyoming Legislature approved a bill to create Goshen County, and it was signed by Gov. Joseph Carey. The county was extracted from Laramie County and is bordered by the state of Nebraska, as well as Platte, Laramie, and Niobrara Counties. Goshen County has blossomed from settlers passing through on the Oregon-California trail, which cut across the county, to an area that includes farming and ranching, a railroad transporting coal from the northern part of the state, and several small towns that support schools, post offices, retail entities, factories, and municipal governments. The towns of Torrington, Lingle, Fort Laramie, Hawk Springs, Yoder, LaGrange, Veteran, and Jay Em make up the county. This volume details the growth of Goshen County due to the Homestead Act of 1862, an irrigation project near Hawk Springs, and veterans from World War I who were part of a second round of homesteading.

Tampa s Historic Cemeteries

Its abundant history is uniquely told with a leisurely stroll through the city's historic cemeteries.

Tampa s Historic Cemeteries

Three years after the 1821 purchase of Florida from Spain, Fort Brooke became the first permanent, modern settlement on the site of present-day Tampa, and a new life began for settlers on Florida's rich gulf coast. By 1855, it was incorporated as the city of Tampa. Continuing its rich, diverse, cultural, and ethnic heritage, Tampa has become the nation's 54th-largest metropolitan community. Its abundant history is uniquely told with a leisurely stroll through the city's historic cemeteries. Oaklawn Cemetery, Tampa's first public burial ground, was created in 1850 when Tampa had only 500 residents. There, one can find governors, senators, mayors, lawyers, doctors, pirates, and thieves--all of whom have a story to tell. By the late 1800s, some of Tampa's most prominent citizens were buried in newly formed cultural and social club burial grounds.

The Settlement of America

It was very tall with a large American flag flying from the top. The flag was ... From
Fort Kearny to Fort Laramie, the roads followed the north and south sides of the
Platte River. Tens of ... (MPI/Stringer/Getty Images) known images of Fort Laramie
.

The Settlement of America

First Published in 2015. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

Fort Peck Indian Reservation Montana

After much negotiation over the two million acres of land, U.S. Congress ratified the agreement in 1888. This colorful heritage and legacy of Fort Peck is commemorated by the 200 images in this photographic collection.

Fort Peck Indian Reservation  Montana

For generations, the Native American people have been a society of great mystery. The Assiniboine and Sioux Indians of the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana are no exception. Although centuries old, their culture is only now being rediscovered and explored. The idea to reveal some of their fascinating story stemmed from the desire, devotion, and dedication of a few individuals to embrace the opportunity to explore this wondrous race of people. In 1851 at Fort Laramie, Wyoming, the tribes of Montana and Dakota territories signed a treaty with the U.S. Government, which led to the beginnings of many congressional hearings concerning Native American reservations. In 1886 at Fort Peck Agency, the Sioux and Assiniboine exerted their sovereign powers and agreed with the government to create the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. After much negotiation over the two million acres of land, U.S. Congress ratified the agreement in 1888. This colorful heritage and legacy of Fort Peck is commemorated by the 200 images in this photographic collection. Featured are scenes of tribal leaders, schoolchildren, families, and celebrations from the late 1880s to the 1920s. All of the images were provided by Native American families living on the Fort Peck Reservation, the Fort Peck Tribal Archives, and the Montana Historical Society.

Red Cloud and the Sioux Problem

Centered on Red Cloud?s career, this is an admirably impartial, circumstantial, and rigorously documented study of the relations between the Sioux and the United States government during the years after the Civil War.

Red Cloud and the Sioux Problem

From the mid-1860s until the end of organized resistance on the Great Plains, Red Cloud, the noted Oglala Sioux, epitomized for many the Indian problem. Centered on Red Cloud?s career, this is an admirably impartial, circumstantial, and rigorously documented study of the relations between the Sioux and the United States government during the years after the Civil War.

Wyoming s Outlaw Trail

Images of America: Wyoming s Outlaw Trail details the history, folklore, and geography behind some of Wyoming s outlaw towns and hideouts chief among them the Hole in the Wall and Red Desert.

Wyoming s Outlaw Trail

A historic and folkloric path that meandered from Canada to Mexico, the Outlaw Trail was used by outlaws such as Butch Cassidy, the Sundance Kid, and the James brothers. Following existing Western routes such as the Oregon Trail, the highway connected towns and natural hideouts essential for bandits escaping the law. Some in Western communities were sympathetic toward the outlaws. Many, like Cassidy, were seen as Robin Hoods, fighting for common people who were under siege by economic forces, corporate encroachment, and other changes occurring in the Old West. Images of America: Wyoming's Outlaw Trail details the history, folklore, and geography behind some of Wyoming's outlaw towns and hideouts--chief among them the Hole in the Wall and Red Desert. Also highlighted are the deeds of the robbers, lawmen, and ordinary folk who rode those dusty trails during the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Western Movie References in American Literature

The other four are Bend ofthe River (1952), The Naked Spur (1953), The Far
Country (1955) and The Manfrom Laramie (1955). Larry McMurtry's The Last
Picture Show (1966) has several references to old movies, including some
westerns.

Western Movie References in American Literature

References to western movies scattered over some 250 works by more than 130 authors constitute the subject matter of this book, arranged in an encyclopedic format. The entries are distributed among western movies, television series, big screen and television actors, western writers, directors and miscellaneous topics related to the genre. The data cover films from The Great Train Robbery (1903) to No Country for Old Men (2007) and the entries include many western film milestones (from The Aryan through Shane to Unforgiven), television classics (Gunsmoke, Bonanza) and great screen cowboys of both “A” and “B” productions.

The Laramie Project and The Laramie Project Ten Years Later

The Laramie Project, one of the most-performed theater pieces in America, has become a modern classic. In this expanded edition, it is joined by an essential and moving sequel to the original play.

The Laramie Project and The Laramie Project  Ten Years Later

The Laramie Project, one of the most-performed theater pieces in America, has become a modern classic. In this expanded edition, it is joined by an essential and moving sequel to the original play. On October 7, 1998, a young gay man was discovered bound to a fence outside Laramie, Wyoming, savagely beaten and left to die in an act of brutality and hate that shocked the nation. Matthew Shepard’s death became a national symbol of intolerance, but for the people of the town, the event was deeply personal. In the aftermath, Moisés Kaufman and members of the Tectonic Theater Project went to Laramie and conducted more than 200 interviews with its citizens. From the transcripts, the playwrights constructed an extraordinary chronicle of life in the town after the murder. In The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later, the troupe revisits the town a decade after the tragedy, finding a community grappling with its legacy and its place in history. The two plays together comprise an epic and deeply moving theatrical cycle that explores the life of an American town over the course a decade.

Berkeley Heights

... MADISON HILL ALTON DOG CORNERS ASH BROOK OAK RIDGE LARAMIE
PARK EVONA NEIGHBORHOOD NAMES IN AND AROUND BERKELEY
HEIGHTS . ... IMAGES of America BERKELEY HEIGHTS Virginia B. Troeger A
ARCADIA.

Berkeley Heights

The Township of Berkeley Heights--a rural community until well into the twentieth century--has matured into a diverse and dynamic town. Images of America: Berkeley Heights chronicles the fascinating history of the township from the 1880s to the early 1960s in a remarkable series of vintage images and lively commentary. Author Virginia B. Troeger invites you to stroll past the homesteads and businesses of yesteryear along Springfield Avenue, visit some of the people who have called Berkeley Heights home, and stop by such landmarks as the Bonnie Burn Sanatorium (later Runnells Hospital), the world-renown Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill (now part of Lucent Technologies), the Deserted Village, Old Saint Mary's Stone Hill, and the unique community of Free Acres.

Modernization Nation Building and Television History

American programswould play a key role byserving as models forwhatkind
ofsociety the Japanese would strive for¦one ... Laramie,. and. the. Japanese.
Domestication. ofAmerica. polls,which stoodin stark contrast to theevil American
image in ...

Modernization  Nation Building  and Television History

This innovative collection investigates the ways in which television programs around the world have highlighted modernization and encouraged nation-building. It is an attempt to catalogue and better understand the contours of this phenomenon, which took place as television developed and expanded in different parts of the world between the 1950s and the 1990s. From popular science and adult education shows to news magazines and television plays, few themes so thoroughly penetrated the small screen for so many years as modernization, with television producers and state authorities using television programs to bolster modernization efforts. Contributors analyze the hallmarks of these media efforts: nation-building, consumerism and consumer culture, the education and integration of citizens, and the glorification of the nation’s technological achievements.

Cicero Revisited

Yet the Cicero story continues to be full of promise and adventure, vision and accomplishment.

Cicero Revisited

Strategically located seven miles west of Chicago's Loop, multifaceted Cicero is one of the oldest and largest municipalities in Illinois. In the late 19th century, this unique industrial suburb developed as an ethnic patchwork of self-sufficient immigrant neighborhoods. Since the Roaring Twenties, when mobster kingpin Al Capone set up shop there, the town has often been characterized by corruption and controversy. Yet the Cicero story continues to be full of promise and adventure, vision and accomplishment. As its population has shifted from heavily eastern European to predominantly Hispanic, Cicero remains a vibrant community where residents maintain strong civic pride, work ethic, and family values.

Livingston

Images of America : Livingston offers a photographic memory of a city that swiftly
became a western place of importance beginning in the early 1880s . With the
building ... All aboard ! One THE EARLY DAYS Following the Fort Laramie treaty
of.

Livingston

In January 1883, barely a month after the Northern Pacific Railroad (NPRR ) finished laying tracks to the "last crossing of the Yellowstone River," Minnesota's Winona Daily Republican proclaimed Livingston as the "future great city of the Yellowstone." With the arrival of the NPRR in 1882, the town boomed as it became the division headquarters for the railroad. Its future secured by the largest machine shops and roundhouse west of Minnesota, Livingston rapidly grew from frontier town to progressive city. By late 1883, its downtown area of substantial brick buildings housed more than 100 businesses, and supported a residential area of 2,000 stalwart citizens. Situated at the junction of the Northern Pacific branch to Yellowstone National Park, Livingston hosted the majority of the early tourist trade to "America's Wonderland of the West."

Black Hills Gold Rush Towns

In this sequel to their Black Hills Gold Rush Towns book, the authors expand their coverage of Black Hills towns during the gold-rush era.

Black Hills Gold Rush Towns

Rising out of the prairie, the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming had long been rumored to have promising quantities of gold. Sacred to the Lakota, the Black Hills was part of the land reserved for them in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868. However, the tide of prospectors seeking their fortune in the Black Hills was difficult to stem. Members of the 1874 Custer expedition, lead by Gen. George Armstrong Custer, found gold. In 1875, scientists Henry Newton and Walter Jenney conducted an expedition and confirmed the rumors. By 1876, the trickle of prospectors and settlers coming to the Black Hills was a flood. The US government realized that keeping the interlopers out was impossible, and in 1877 the Black Hills was officially opened to settlement. In this sequel to their Black Hills Gold Rush Towns book, the authors expand their coverage of Black Hills towns during the gold-rush era.

The Laramie Project

On October 7, 1998, a young gay man was discovered bound to a fence in the hills outside Laramie, Wyoming, savagely beaten and left to die in an act of hate that shocked the nation.

The Laramie Project

On October 7, 1998, a young gay man was discovered bound to a fence in the hills outside Laramie, Wyoming, savagely beaten and left to die in an act of hate that shocked the nation. Matthew Shepard’s death became a national symbol of intolerance, but for the people of Laramie the event was deeply personal, and it’s they we hear in this stunningly effective theater piece, a deeply complex portrait of a community.

Mari Sandoz s Native Nebraska

Through the compilation of over 200 images in this new book, taken from historical collections and her own work, author and photographer LaVerne Harrell Clark contributes to that same purpose.

Mari Sandoz s Native Nebraska

When the Mari Sandoz High Plains Center opens in Chadron, Nebraska in 2001, it will be one of three centers at which Nebraska honors its outstanding writers. Through the compilation of over 200 images in this new book, taken from historical collections and her own work, author and photographer LaVerne Harrell Clark contributes to that same purpose. In it, she recreates the frontier life of settlers and the neighboring Sioux and Cheyenne Indians of the sandhills region of northwestern Nebraska. Accompanied by in-depth captions detailing Mari Sandoz's life and works, these images illustrate how she came to hold an outstanding place as an American writer until her death in 1966. Born in 1896, in the "free-land" region of the Nebraska Panhandle, Sandoz was greatly influenced in her writing by the people who called at her homestead. Her acquaintances included Bad Arm, a Sioux Indian who fought at the Little Bighorn and was present at Wounded Knee, "Old Cheyenne Woman," a survivor of both the Oklahoma and Fort Robinson conflicts, and William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, the legend of the Old West.

Weston County

Today, Weston County people are as diverse as this magnificent land of rugged timber that flows into sagebrush and short-grass prairies.

Weston County

Tucked in the northeast corner of Wyoming against the Black Hills is Weston County. The county has served as a gateway, byway, and way of life and living. In the beginning, it was home to dinosaurs and volcanoes. Nomadic Indians then wandered through, leaving signs of their passing, and the great Sioux Indian Nations held this land dear. Finally, the area was seen as a place to settle, since the mineral-rich land and rolling grasslands provided an economic backdrop for people to stay and build a home for their families. Today, Weston County people are as diverse as this magnificent land of rugged timber that flows into sagebrush and short-grass prairies.

Alsip

The village of Alsip got its name from the area's first big business, Frank Alsip's Brickyard. Although Alsip is now known for its tight-knit neighborhoods and large industrial community, it was not always so.

Alsip

The village of Alsip got its name from the area's first big business, Frank Alsip's Brickyard. Although Alsip is now known for its tight-knit neighborhoods and large industrial community, it was not always so. Recorded area history goes back to the 1600s, when a Catholic mission stood at 122nd and Loveland Streets, and the first European settlers began farming the area in the 1800s. The historic farmhouse featured on the front cover was homesteaded by DeWitt and Amy Baxter Lane in 1835. Area maps identified this homestead as "Lanes Island" because it was surrounded by marshy swamps. DeWitt's father, Joseph, opened a smithy along a busy Indian trail that passed by Lanes Island and worked until he died in 1839. The tough-as-nails pioneers featured in Images of America: Alsip drained the swampland, which gave rise to a future of fertile farming, eventually leading to the first Village of Alsip board meeting, held on April 26, 1927.