French War Films and National Identity

Armée is not some kind of nemesis for Resistancialism but an exploration and reworking of it. 238. Flitterman-Lewis, “Army of Shadows,” 69. 239. Duran, “L'Armée des ombres (En pleine lumière).” 240. “Melville se moque du réalisme, ...

French War Films and National Identity


Resistance and Collaboration in Hitler s Empire

In L'Armée des ombres (Army of Shadows, 1969), the director, JeanPierre Melville – himself a veteran resister – demonstrated how lonely and isolating the life of the resister could be. Melville also showed how ruthless resisters were in ...

Resistance and Collaboration in Hitler s Empire

This new study provides a concise, accessible introduction to occupied Europe. It gives a clear overview of the history and historiography of resistance and collaboration. It explores how these terms cannot be examined separately, but are always entangled. Covering Europe from east to west, this book aims to explore the evolution of scholarly approaches to resistance and collaboration. Not limiting itself to any one area, it looks at armed struggle, daily life, complicity and rescue, the Catholic Church and official and public memory since the end of the war. Vesna Drapac is Associate Professor of History at the University of Adelaide, Australia. Her publications include War and Religion: Catholics in the Churches of Occupied Paris and Constructing Yugoslavia: A Transnational History. Gareth Pritchard is Lecturer in History at the University of Adelaide. He is also the author of Niemandsland: A History of Unoccupied Germany and The Making of the GDR.

100 Great War Movies The Real History Behind the Films

Kurtz are based on the central characters in Conrad's Heart of Darkness but Coppola has admitted that Kurtz was also loosely ... ARMY OF SHADOWS [FRENCH: L'ARMÉE DES OMBRES] (1969) Synopsis Army of Shadows is a French film directed by ...

100 Great War Movies  The Real History Behind the Films

This book serves as a fascinating guide to 100 war films from 1930 to the present. Readers interested in war movies will learn surprising anecdotes about these films and will have all their questions about the films' historical accuracy answered. • Applies an internationalist perspective to the war film through entries from countries including Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Australia, Japan, Poland, Finland, and Latvia • Defines great war films as the most artistically accomplished, politically subversive, and thought-provoking, not merely as the most popular or commercially successful, and is therefore a relevant reference for students and film and history buffs • Provides clearly written and informative histories of the films themselves as well as of the cultural context surrounding the making and reception of them • Recounts critical controversies and analyzes the ideological biases implicit in these films in its examination of how the films shaped their source material and what they included, distorted, and added or left out

The Enemy in Contemporary Film

Guédiguian) 162 Army of Crime (see L'Armée du crime, dir. Guédiguian) Army of Shadows (see L'armée des ombres, dir. Melville) Der Arzt von Stalingrad (dir. von Radvanyi) 128–129, 139, 143 As If I Am Not There (dir.

The Enemy in Contemporary Film

While filmic representations of ‘enemies’ are legion, film studies have so far neglected the way in which filmic mediations of enemy images have contributed to shaping cultural memories. The present volume investigates the (de)(re)constructions of enemy images in international film since the 1970s. The three parts deal with (re)configurations of the enemy in contemporary global cinemas, analysing films on the two world wars, on regional military conflicts, ethnic, racial and gender conflicts, socio-political conflicts and forms of terrorism. The essays concentrate on film aesthetics and contemporary (geo)politics, on filmic renderings of identity crises caused by troubled national pasts, and on the way films explore the collective psychological mechanisms at play in the construction, perpetuation or problematizing of enemy images. The volume aims to show how in spite of the diversity of national cinemas, moving images are constitutive of national collectivities by rendering conflicts involving an external or internal enemy as the defining points in national or communal histories. It also points out how the dynamics of internalism and exteriority (of ‘we’ and ‘they’) has proved vital in this process.

Chris Marker

... René Clément's Le Jour et l'heure ( 1963 ) and Jean - Pierre Melville's L'Armée des ombres ( 1969 , The Army of Shadows ) . Marker is most interested in those occasions when the life and the shadow realm of the movies bleed into and ...

Chris Marker

A critical study of the work of film-maker and media artist Chris Marker.

Translating War

1943x. Une veillée de l'âge hitlérienne. France-Amérique, December 26, 3. ———. 1944a. L'Armée des ombres. New York: Pantheon Books. ———. 1944b. Army of Shadows. Trans. H. Chevalier. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ———. 1944c. Army ofShadows.

Translating War

This book examines the role played by the international circulation of literature in constructing cultural memories of the Second World War. War writing has rarely been read from the point of view of translation even though war is by definition a multilingual event, and knowledge of the Second World War and the Holocaust is mediated through translated texts. Here, the author opens up this field of research through analysis of several important works of French war fiction and their English translations. The book examines the wartime publishing structures which facilitated literary exchanges across national borders, the strategies adopted by translators of war fiction, the relationships between translated war fiction and dominant national memories of the war, and questions of multilingualism in war writing. In doing so, it sheds new light on the political and ethical questions that arise when the trauma of war is represented in fiction and through translation. This engaging work will appeal to students and scholars of translation, cultural memory, war fiction and Holocaust writing.

Holocaust Cinema Complete

The Army of Crime—L'armée du crime (2009) Army of Shadows—L'armée des ombres (1969) Assassination in Davos—Konfrontation (1974) At the Fountainhead (of German Strength) (1980) [Wikipedia] The film deals with the development of the ...

Holocaust Cinema Complete

Holocaust movies have become an important segment of world cinema and the de-facto Holocaust education for many. One quarter of all American-produced Holocaust-related feature films have won or been nominated for at least one Oscar. In fact, from 1945 through 1991, half of all American Holocaust features were nominated. Yet most Holocaust movies have fallen through the cracks and few have been commercially successful. This book explores these trends--and many others--with a comprehensive guide to hundreds of films and made-for-television movies. From Anne Frank to Schindler's List to Jojo Rabbit, more than 400 films are examined from a range of perspectives--historical, chronological, thematic, sociological, geographical and individual. The filmmakers are contextualized, including Charlie Chaplin, Sidney Lumet, Steven Spielberg and Roman Polanski. Recommendations and reviews of the 50 best Holocaust films are included, along with an educational guide, a detailed listing of all films covered and a four-part index-glossary.

The Modern American Military

... 233–34 impact of, 223 military maintenance costs reduced by, 119 national security from, 214 objections to, ... 5–6 vision of war of, 42–44 Armed Forces Qualification Test, 107n37 L'armée des ombres (Army of Shadows) (film, 1969), ...

The Modern American Military

The advent of the all-volunteer force and the evolving nature of modern warfare have transformed our military, changing it in serious if subtle ways that few Americans are aware of. Edited by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David M. Kennedy, this stimulating volume brings together insights from a remarkable group of scholars, who shed important new light on the changes effecting today's armed forces. Beginning with a Foreword by former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry, the contributors take an historical approach as they explore the ever-changing strategic, political, and fiscal contexts in which the armed forces are trained and deployed, and the constantly shifting objectives that they are tasked to achieve in the post-9/11 environment. They also offer strong points of view. Lawrence Freedman, for instance, takes the leadership to task for uncritically embracing the high-tech Revolution in Military Affairs when "conventional" warfare seems increasingly unlikely. And eminent psychiatrist Jonathan Shay warns that the post-battle effects of what he terms "moral wounds" currently receive inadequate attention from the military and the medical profession. Perhaps most troubling, Karl Eikenberry raises the issue of the "political ownership" of the military in an era of all-volunteer service, citing the argument that, absent the political protest common to the draft era, government decision-makers felt free to carry out military operations in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Andrew Bacevich goes further, writing that "it's no longer our army; it hasn't been for years; it's theirs [the government's] and they intend to keep it." Looking at such issues as who serves and why, the impact of non-uniformed "contractors" in the war zone, and the growing role of women in combat, this volume brings together leading thinkers who illuminate the American military at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

The Literature of Absolute War

They avoid open confrontations with large regular armies; they favor surprises, preferring the sudden, swift, ... that Joseph Kessel's 1943 classic novel on the French Resistance bears the title L'armée des ombres (Army of Shadows).

The Literature of Absolute War

This is the first comparative transnational approach to the language of absolute war and the literature on World War II.

The Rise and Fall of Intelligence

SIS recreated La Dame Blanche in Belgium, and in France the service worked with SOE and local networks like the “Alliance” and its leader Marie-Madeleine Fourcade (later immortalized in the movie L'armee des ombres [Army of Shadows]).87 ...

The Rise and Fall of Intelligence

This sweeping history of the development of professional, institutionalized intelligence examines the implications of the fall of the state monopoly on espionage today and beyond. During the Cold War, only the alliances clustered around the two superpowers maintained viable intelligence endeavors, whereas a century ago, many states could aspire to be competitive at these dark arts. Today, larger states have lost their monopoly on intelligence skills and capabilities as technological and sociopolitical changes have made it possible for private organizations and even individuals to unearth secrets and influence global events. Historian Michael Warner addresses the birth of professional intelligence in Europe at the beginning of the twentieth century and the subsequent rise of US intelligence during the Cold War. He brings this history up to the present day as intelligence agencies used the struggle against terrorism and the digital revolution to improve capabilities in the 2000s. Throughout, the book examines how states and other entities use intelligence to create, exploit, and protect secret advantages against others, and emphasizes how technological advancement and ideological competition drive intelligence, improving its techniques and creating a need for intelligence and counterintelligence activities to serve and protect policymakers and commanders. The world changes intelligence and intelligence changes the world. This sweeping history of espionage and intelligence will be a welcomed by practitioners, students, and scholars of security studies, international affairs, and intelligence, as well as general audiences interested in the evolution of espionage and technology.

When Paris Went Dark

... CA: MGM/UA HomeVideo, 1991. DVD. Melville, JeanPierre, dir.L'Armée des ombres (Army of Shadows). ... New York: Dramatic Risks, Inc., 2010. DVD. Footnotes Preface fn1The very northern partofFrance wasattached tothe military governmentof.

When Paris Went Dark

In May and June 1940 almost four million people fled Paris and its suburbs in anticipation of a German invasion. On June 14, the German Army tentatively entered the silent and eerily empty French capital. Without one shot being fired in its defence, the Occupation of Paris had begun. When Paris Went Dark tells the extraordinary story of Germany's capture and Occupation of Paris, Hitler's relationship with the City of Light, and its citizens' attempts at living in an environment that was almost untouched by war, but which had become uncanny overnight. Beginning with the Phoney War and Hitler's first visit to the city, acclaimed literary historian and critic Ronald Rosbottom takes us through the German Army's almost unopposed seizure of Paris, its bureaucratic re-organization of that city, with the aid of collaborationist Frenchmen, and the daily adjustments Parisians had to make to this new oppressive presence. Using memoirs, interviews and published eye-witness accounts, Rosbottom expertly weaves a narrative of daily life for both the Occupier and the Occupied. He shows its effects on the Parisian celebrity circles of Pablo Picasso, Simone de Beauvoir, Colette, Jean Cocteau, and Jean-Paul Sartre, and on the ordinary citizens of its twenty arrondissements. But Paris is the protagonist of this story, and Rosbottom provides us with a template for seeing the City of Light as more than a place of pleasure and beauty.

World War II Movies

Army of Shadows (French: L'armée des ombres) is a 1969 French film directed by Jean-Pierre Melville. It is a film adaptation of Joseph Kessel's 1943 book of the same name, which blends Kessel's own experiences as a member of the French ...

World War II Movies

Movies about WWII have been award-winning blockbusters. World War II Movies is a summary of 100 of the greatest WWII movies ever made in reverse chronological order, from Inglourious Basterds, with its eight Academy Award nominations, to Casablanca, which won three, including Best Picture. Patton was recipient of ten Academy Award nominations and winner of eight. Saving Private Ryan was nominated for eleven Academy Awards, with five wins.

French Cinema

This same feeling of entrapment is found in Melville's next feature film, The Shadow Army (L'armée des ombres, 1969). Widely regarded as the most historically accurate screen version of the French Resistance, the film (it was never ...

French Cinema

To a large extent, the story of French filmmaking is the story of moviemaking. From the earliest flickering images of the late nineteenth century through the silent era, Surrealist influences, the Nazi Occupation, the glories of the New Wave, the rebirth of the industry in the 1990s with the exception culturelle, and the present, Rémi Lanzoni examines a considerable number of the world's most beloved films. Building upon his 2004 best-selling edition, the second edition of French Cinema maintains the chronological analysis, factual reliability, ease of use, and accessible prose, while at once concentrating more on the current generation of female directors, mainstream productions such as The Artist and The Intouchables, and the emergence of minority filmmakers (Beur cinema).

World War II Goes to the Movies Television Guide Volume I A K

20th FOX 105min * Army Posts Whiling away the hours, GIs watch films on a regular basis at most Army posts on makeshift ... Shadows/L'armee des ombres (1969) Lino Ventura, Paul Meurisse, Jean-Pierre Cassel, Simone Signoret, Claude Mann, ...

World War II Goes to the Movies   Television Guide Volume I A K


The Cinema of Francesco Rosi

He often played the commissaire, but he was also known for his performance as the head of the resistance in Jena- Pierre Melville's L'Armée des ombres (Army of Shadows, 1969). To secure his participation to the film, Rosi flew to Paris, ...

The Cinema of Francesco Rosi

Francesco Rosi is one of the great realist artists of post-war Italian, indeed post-war world cinema. In this book, author Gaetana Marrone explores the rich visual language in which the Neapolitan filmmaker expresses the cultural icons that constitute his style and images. Over the years, Rosi has offered us films that trace an intricate path between the real and the fictive, the factual and the imagined. His films show an extraordinarily consistent formal balance while representing historical events as social emblems that examine, shape, and reflect the national self. They rely on a labyrinthine narrative structure, in which the sense of an enigma replaces the unidirectional path leading ineluctably to a designated end and solution. Rosi's logical investigations are conducted by an omniscient eye and translated into a cinematic approach that embraces the details of material reality with the panoramic perspective of a dispassionate observer. This book offers intertextual analyses within such fields as history, politics, literature, and photography, along with production information gleaned from Rosi's personal archives and interviews. It examines Rosi's creative use of film as document, and as spectacle). It is also a study of the specific cinematic techniques that characterize Rosi's work and that visually, compositionally, express his vision of history and the elusive "truth" of past and present social and political realities.

Screen Nazis

... between occupier and occupied in Le silence de la mer (The Silence ofthe Sea, 1948); Tarantino cited its country-house setting in the frst part of Inglourious Basterds. Melville also directed L'armée des ombres (Army of Shadows ...

Screen Nazis

From the late 1930s to the early twenty-first century, European and American filmmakers have displayed an enduring fascination with Nazi leaders, rituals, and symbols, making scores of films from Confessions of a Nazi Spy (1939) and Watch on the Rhine (1943) through Des Teufels General (The Devil’s General, 1955) and Pasqualino settebellezze (Seven Beauties, 1975), up to Der Untergang (Downfall, 2004), Inglourious Basterds (2009), and beyond. Probing the emotional sources and effects of this fascination, Sabine Hake looks at the historical relationship between film and fascism and its far-reaching implications for mass culture, media society, and political life. In confronting the specter and spectacle of fascist power, these films not only depict historical figures and events but also demand emotional responses from their audiences, infusing the abstract ideals of democracy, liberalism, and pluralism with new meaning and relevance. Hake underscores her argument with a comprehensive discussion of films, including perspectives on production history, film authorship, reception history, and questions of performance, spectatorship, and intertextuality. Chapters focus on the Hollywood anti-Nazi films of the 1940s, the West German anti-Nazi films of the 1950s, the East German anti-fascist films of the 1960s, the Italian “Naziploitation” films of the 1970s, and issues related to fascist aesthetics, the ethics of resistance, and questions of historicization in films of the 1980s–2000s from the United States and numerous European countries.

The Dandy at Dusk

After leaving school he drifted for a while, taking a variety of jobs until he was called up for military service in ... the city he was later to mythologize in his own mind and by proxy in L'Armée des ombres (Army of Shadows, 1969).

The Dandy at Dusk

Philip Mann chronicles the relationship of dandyism and the emerging cultural landscape of modernity via portraits of Regency England's Beau Brummel – the first dandy – and six twentieth-century figures: Austrian architect Adolf Loos, the Duke of Windsor, neo-Edwardian courtier Bunny Roger, writer and raconteur Quentin Crisp, French film producer Jean-Pierre Melville, and New German Cinema enfant terrible and inverted dandy Rainer Werner Fassbinder. He blends memorable anecdotes with acute analysis to explore their style, identity and influence and interweaves their stories with an entertaining history of tailoring and men's fashion. The Dandy at Dusk contextualizes the relationship between dandyism, decadence and modernism, against the background of a century punctuated by global conflict and social upheaval.

War beyond Words

Jean-Pierre Melville's 1969 film L'armée des ombres (Army of Shadows) in effect summarized a gritty, harsh, unvarnished presentation of the impossible choices Resistance fighters had to face. Their war was indeed a dark one, ...

War beyond Words

What we know of war is always mediated knowledge and feeling. We need lenses to filter out some of its blinding, terrifying light. These lenses are not fixed; they change over time, and Jay Winter's panoramic history of war and memory offers an unprecedented study of transformations in our imaginings of war, from 1914 to the present. He reveals the ways in which different creative arts have framed our meditations on war, from painting and sculpture to photography, film and poetry, and ultimately to silence, as a language of memory in its own right. He shows how these highly mediated images of war, in turn, circulate through language to constitute our 'cultural memory' of war. This is a major contribution to our understanding of the diverse ways in which men and women have wrestled with the intractable task of conveying what twentieth-century wars meant to them and mean to us.

Waiting for the Resistance

The later one, L'Armée des Ombres (Army of Shadows, 1969) has classic status; it is a dark poem, a distillation of the myth. Melville structures the underground networks, pursuits and escapes as for a policier, a crime flick, ...

Waiting for the Resistance

Combining elements of fiction, history, reportage and analysis, Sylvia Lawson examines the way the spirit of wartime resistance resurfaced in Paris in the insurrection of May 1968, when a rare unity of intellectuals and industrial workers woke a complacent society. She chronicles moments of resistance: the story of intrepid Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, who was murdered for her opposition to the Russian oppression of Chechnya; the highly contentious Northern Territory Intervention and Aboriginal dispossession; East Timorese and West Papuan resistance to Indonesian domination. Resistance is about more than protest in the streets; it's about writing and art-making, music and filming, and not least about the way ordinary people keep going. As the Arab Spring unfolds and the Occupy Wall Street initiative has spread round the world, a resistant tradition has been actively inherited: the right to protest and rebel against greed and injustice, to claim public space, to recreate the active, convivial city.