Last of the Curlews

This new paperback edition includes a foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet W.S. Merwin and an afterword by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann.

Last of the Curlews

In this conservation classic, originally published fifty-five years ago, Fred Bodsworth tells the story of a solitary Eskimo curlew’s perilous migration and search for a mate. The lone survivor comes to stand for the entirety of a species on the brink of extinction, and for all in nature that is endangered. This new paperback edition includes a foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet W.S. Merwin and an afterword by Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murray Gell-Mann.

Into Great Silence

Last. One. Like theothersthelastonefellinto itsshadow. It fell
intoitsshadowonthewater. They took it away its shadow stayed on the ... Aptly, I
received this instruction not at school, but after, on The Last of the Curlews, an
ABC Afterschool Special ...

Into Great Silence

Science entwines with matters of the human heart as a whale researcher chronicles the lives of an endangered family of orcas Ever since Eva Saulitis began her whale research in Alaska in the 1980s, she has been drawn deeply into the lives of a single extended family of endangered orcas struggling to survive in Prince William Sound. Over the course of a decades-long career spent observing and studying these whales, and eventually coming to know them as individuals, she has, sadly, witnessed the devastation wrought by the Exxon Valdez oil spill of 1989—after which not a single calf has been born to the group. With the intellectual rigor of a scientist and the heart of a poet, Saulitis gives voice to these vital yet vanishing survivors and the place they are so loyal to. Both an elegy for one orca family and a celebration of the entire species, Into Great Silence is a moving portrait of the interconnectedness of humans with animals and place—and of the responsibility we have to protect them.

Facing Extinction

... then, must be the plight of the last individual of its kind. fred bosworth's classic
story Last of the Curlews (bodsworth 1956), which mixed facts about the decline
to extinction of the eskimo Curlew Numenius borealis (Chapter 25) with a fictional
 ...

Facing Extinction

Almost two hundred species of birds have become extinct in the past 400 years, and a similar number today are in imminent danger of following them. The world's conservationists are leading the fight to prevent the demise of these remaining critically endangered birds, with a fair degree of success. This new book examines the process and issues concerning extinction - how and why it happens and what can be done about it. Whilst man is to blame for many of the causes, such as persecution and habitat loss, species have become extinct on a regular basis since life began. After several thought-provoking introductory chapters, the book showcases about 20 species on the brink of extinction from around the world and describes the work that is being undertaken to save them. Some are success stories, but a few are not. This is a subject close to the hearts of all birders and ornithologists and this book, written by a team of leading conservationists, will strike a chord in most of them.

Clearing Land

The burning was meant to attract large flocks of American golden plovers and
curlews, which were killed for market. As Fred Bosworth notes in Last of the
Curlews: And sometimes, during northeast storms, tremendous numbers of the
curlews ...

Clearing Land

Though few of us now live close to the soil, the world we inhabit has been sculpted by our long national saga of settlement. At the heart of our identity lies the notion of the family farm, as shaped by European history and reshaped by the vast opportunities of the continent. It lies at the heart of Jane Brox's personal story, too: she is the daughter of immigrant New England farmers whose way of life she memorialized in her first two books but has not carried on. In this clear-eyed, lyrical account, Brox twines the two narratives, personal and historical, to explore the place of the family farm as it has evolved from the pilgrims' brutal progress at Plymouth to the modern world, where much of our food is produced by industrial agriculture while the small farm is both marginalized and romanticized. In considering the place of the farm, Brox also considers the rise of textile cities in America, which encroached not only upon farms and farmers but upon the sense of commonality that once sustained them; and she traces the transformation of the idea of wilderness--and its intricate connection to cultivation--which changed as our ties to the land loosened, as terror of the wild was replaced by desire for it. Exploring these strands with neither judgment nor sentimentality, Brox arrives at something beyond a biography of the farm: a vivid depiction of the half-life it carries on in our collective imagination.

The Joy of Reading

The authors discussed in this chapter are definitely children of the last half of the
twentieth century. If they wrote about World War II, ... that I have most enjoyed in
those years. FRED BODSWORTH 1918– Last of the Curlews O Fred Bodsworth ...

The Joy of Reading

"Charles Van Doren has laid a feast before all of us that is irresistible." -Mortimer J. Adler This engaging love letter to reading follows the great authors and classics that transformed the world: from Aristotle and Herodotus in ancient Greece to Salinger and Heinlein in 20th century America. Like a professor whose enthusiasm enwraps his students, Van Doren explains what's wonderful in the books you've missed and awakens your desire to reopen the books you already know. Divided chronologically by the periods in which these classics were written, each book is put in its historical context and brought to life by Van Doren's brilliant analysis. The Joy of Reading delves into a wide range of genres-fiction, poetry, drama, children's books, philosophy, history and science. This is the one book that brings together everything you need to know about the classics you missed and ignites your passion to read and reread the greatest books the world has ever known. This book is the fruit of a lifelong love affair. Reading, I believe, is my favorite thing to do; books and I have been inseparable almost as long as I can remember ... To this day, I become distressed if I am anywhere without a book, a magazine, a newspaper, any scrap of paper to read .... I like the smell of books, certainly the feel of them. Life without books would be, for me, a vacant horror." -Charles Van Doren "Nothing recommends the joy of reading better than the communication of it by a person who has spent a lifetime enriched by the delights of reading. Charles Van Doren is that kind of reader. He has laid a feast before us that is irresistible." -Mortimer J. Adler, author of How to Read a Book "Mr. Van Doren is that rarity, a truly well read man who reads not for professional purposes but for pleasure. His book spurs us on to explore more deeply and joyfully the infinitely varied terrain of good books." -Clifton Fadiman, author of The New Lifetime Reading Plan: The Classical Guide to World Literature

Other Selves

Fred Bodsworth seeks to avoid such anthropomorphism in Last of the Curlews (
1954), a pathos-filled drama of species extinction. He tells us that the curlew
possesses "a brain so keenly keyed to instinctive responses that there was little ...

Other Selves

The most recent installment of the Reappraisals series, which examines the range of meanings associated with animals in the Canadian literary imagination.

Lost Animals

Quaggas and other Zebras. Plymouth. Bodsworth, Fred. 1955. Last of the
Curlews. London. Buller, Walter. 1888–9. A History of the Birds of New Zealand.
London. Coues, Elliot. 1874. Birds of the North West. Washington. Cokinos,
Christopher.

Lost Animals

A photograph of an animal long-gone evokes a feeling of loss more than a painting ever can. Often tinted sepia or black-and-white, these images were mainly taken in zoos or wildlife parks, and in a handful of cases featured the last known individual of the species. There are some familiar examples, such as Martha, the last Passenger Pigeon, or the Ivory-billed Woodpecker, recently fledged and perching happily on the hat of one of the biologists that had just ringed it. But for every Martha there are a number of less familiar extinct birds and mammals that were caught on camera prior to their demise. The photographic record of extinction is the focus of this remarkable book, written by the world's leading authority on vanished animals, Errol Fuller. Lost Animals features photographs dating from around 1870 to as recently as 2004, the year that saw the demise of the Hawaiian Po'ouli. From a mother Thylacine and her pups to now-extinct birds such as the Heath Hen and Carolina Parakeet, Fuller tells the tale of each animal, why it became extinct, and discusses the circumstances surrounding the photography itself, in a book rich with unique images. The photographs themselves are poignant and compelling. They provide a tangible link to animals that have now vanished forever, in a book that brings the past to life while delivering a warning for the future.

Racial Attitudes in English Canadian Fiction 1905 1980

Accordingly he began The Strange One with only birds as characters, along the
lines of The Last of the Curlews, and included the racism motif later. Personal
interview with Fred Bodsworth, Sept. 26, 1981. 16 Fred Bodsworth, The Strange
One ...

Racial Attitudes in English Canadian Fiction  1905 1980

Racial Attitudes in English-Canadian Fiction is a critical overview of the appearances and consequences of racism in English-Canadian fiction published between 1905 and 1980. Based on an analysis of traditional expressions in literature of group solidarity and resentment, the study screens English-Canadian novels for fictional representations of such feelings. Beginning with the English-Canadian reaction to the mass influx of immigrants into Western Canada after World War One, it examines the fiction of novelists such as Ralph Connor and Nellie McClung. The author then suggests that the cumulative effect of a number of individual voices, such as Grove and Salverson, constituted a counter-reaction which has been made more positive by Laurence, Lysenko, Richler and Clarke. The “debate” between these two sides, carried on in fictional and non-fictional writing, is seen to be in part resolved in synthesis after World War Two, as attitudes are forced by wartime alliances and intellectual pressures into a qualified liberalism. The author shows how single novels by Graham, Bodsworth, and Callaghan demonstrated a new concern for the exposure and eradication of racial discrimination, an attitude taken further by the works of Wiebe and Klein. The book concentrates on single texts that best portray deliberately or not, racist ideology or anti-racist arguments, and attempts to explain the arousal in Canada of such ideas.

From Origin to Ecology

... he nevertheless has taken his appeals for environmental reformation to the
pages of the more popular Sierra and The New York Times Magazine. Recently,
he has initiated the reprinting of and written an introduction for Last of the
Curlews, ...

From Origin to Ecology

"Frazier examines Merwin's poetry with regard to ecocriticism, anthropology, Merwin's fellow poets, Merwin criticism, and his own essays and interviews. Of central importance is Merwin's indebtedness to Henry David Thoreau, his sense that Thoreau guided American writing in a new direction whereby nature could be seen as something of value for itself."--BOOK JACKET.

Great Canadian Animal Stories

Abelard-Schuman Limited for H. Mortimer Batten's “Kana Kree and the Skunk
War” from Whispers of the Wilderness. Fred Bodsworth for his chapter from Last
of the Curlews. Ann Haig-Brown for Roderick HaigBrown's “Blackstreak's
Courting” ...

Great Canadian Animal Stories

In Great Canadian Animal Stories, sixteen masters of storytelling, keen observers either of nature or of their own animal companions, come together with tales that bring their experiences vividly to life. It includes classic stories by Jack London, Farley Mowat, Grey Owl, and Fred Bodsworth.

Animal Victims in Modern Fiction

In Last of the Curlews , the curlew ' s world is not so much subsumed by the
larger and more powerful world of humankind as it is wrecked by the incursions
of an inexplicable animal . The biological instincts within the lone , last curlew
remain ...

Animal Victims in Modern Fiction

The Darwinian revolution profoundly altered society's conception of animals. Scholtmeijer explores the ways in which modern literature has reflected this change in its attempts to deal with the reality of the autonomous animal and the animal victim. She considers works of fiction dealing with animal victims in the wild and in urban settings, how they are used to represent human sexual dilemmas, and how the hopes and disillusionments invested in myth generate animal victims. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Art of Hanna Barbera

The curlew leads a flock of migrating plovers. of pleasure – he soars straight into
the sky when he joins the migrating plovers, and he ... The Last of the Curlews
falters only when it interjects an instructional note about hunting into the scenario.

The Art of Hanna Barbera

The fascinating history of the art of animation focuses on the pioneering team of William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, whose innovative techniques and such memorable characters as Yogi Bear and Fred Flintstone created an empire of television animations

The Nature of Birds

The slaughter was almost unbelievable , ' wrote Fred Bodsworth , in The Last of
the Curlews . ' Hunters would shoot the birds without mercy until they had literally
slaughtered a wagonload of them , the wagons being actually filled , and often ...

The Nature of Birds

The Nature of Birds captures in pictures and text the fascination, drama and mystery of Canada's birds.

The Nature of Nebraska

This route had the advantage of being rapid and allowed the curlews to exploit
the early fall food resources of the ... Finally , on April 17 , 1915 , a single bird was
shot near Norfolk , perhaps being the last curlew to be shot in the United States ...

The Nature of Nebraska

Where the eastern and western currents of American life merge as smoothly as one river flows into another is a place called Nebraska. There we find the Platte, a river that gave sustenance to the countless migrants who once trudged westward along the Mormon and Oregon trails. We find the Sandhills, a vast region of sandy grassland that represents the largest area of dunes and the grandest and least disturbed region of mixed-grass prairies in all the Western Hemisphere. And, below it all, we find the Ogallala aquifer, the largest potential source of unpolluted water anywhere. ø These ecological treasures are all part of the nature of Nebraska. With characteristic clarity, energy, and charm, Paul A. Johnsgard guides us through Nebraska?s incredible biodiversity, introducing us to each ecosystem and the flora and fauna it sustains and inviting us to contemplate the purpose and secrets of the natural world as we consider our own roles and responsibilities in our connection with it.

Earth Water and Sky

Another four weeks was probably needed for the young curlews birds to fledge.
By the ... So far as anyone knows, it was the last curlew to be killed in Nebraska,
although a group of eight was reported seen near Hastings on April 8, 1926.

Earth  Water  and Sky

"As I write this, I am sitting in a cabin at Cedar Point Biological Station in southwestern Nebraska.... The glorious elemental mixture of earth, water, and sky around me is the home of nearly three hundred species of birds, and comprises one of my favorite places in the world. Here no radio stations blare out the most recent results of meaningless sports events ... no traffic noises confound the senses. Instead the wind is the unquestioned dominating summer influence. The prairie grasses bend willingly and gracefully before it, and the leaves of the cottonwood trees convert its breezes into soft music." Paul Johnsgard is one of America's most prominent ornithologists and a world authority on waterfowl behavior. In these popularly written, often lyrical essays, he describes some of his most fascinating encounters with birds, from watching the annual mating displays of prairie-chickens on a hilltop in Pawnee County, Nebraska, to attempting to solve some of the mysteries surrounding Australia's nearly flightless musk duck. Reflecting his worldwide interests and travels, the birds Johnsgard describes inhabit many parts of the globe. Grouping the birds by the element they frequent most—earth, water, or sky—he weaves a wealth of accurate natural history into personal stories drawn from a lifetime of avian observation. And, as a bonus, Johnsgard's lovely pen-and-ink drawings illustrate each species he describes.

Curlew Moon

‘Focuses a razor light on the plight of one of our most iconic birds.

Curlew Moon

‘Focuses a razor light on the plight of one of our most iconic birds. Inspirational!’ Tim Birkhead Curlews are Britain’s largest wading bird, known for their evocative calls which embody wild places; they provoke a range of emotions that many have expressed in poetry, art and music.

Cry of the Curlew The Frontier Series 1

Maoris last week in the Waikato campaign.' 'Do I know the man?' Granville
queried and was slightly annoyed at his cousin's theatricals. 'Apparently you did,'
David answered, raising his eyebrows. 'According to the report, the man known
as ...

Cry of the Curlew  The Frontier Series 1

The first bestselling novel in the compelling Duffy and Macintosh series, depicting our turbulent history as never before. "The home grown version of Wilbur Smith" The Sunday Age A stark and vivid novel of Australia's brutal past. An epic tale of two families, the Macintoshes and the Duffys, who are locked in a deadly battle from the moment squatter Donald Macintosh commits an act of barbarity on his Queensland property. Their paths cross in love, death and revenge as both families fight to tame the wild frontier of Australia's north country. PRAISE FOR THE SERIES "A rousing and revealing yarn" Weekend Australian "the historical detail brings the ... 19th century to rip-roaring life" The Australian "Watt's fans love his work for its history, adventure and storytelling" Brisbane News

Sea of Slaughter

The wanton destruction of the Eskimo curlew provides a classic example, not
only of the ruthlessness of modern man, but also ... The last curlews to be seen in
the Halifax market were sold there in the fall of 1897; by 1900, Newfoundland
and ...

Sea of Slaughter

The northeastern seaboard of Canada and the United States, extending from Labrador to Cape Cod, was the first region of North America to suffer from human exploitation. Farley Mowat informs extensive historical and biological research with his direct experience living in and observing this region. When it was first published more than 20 years ago, Sea of Slaughter served as a catalyst for environment reform, raising awareness of the decline and destruction of marine and coastal species. Today, it remains a prescient environmental classic, serving, now as ever, as a haunting reminder of the impact of human interest on the natural world.

The Conversations At Curlew Creek

He and Fergus would have their encounter at last on some rocky promontory at
the world's end while the band in the pit thumped and sawed and the whole
house held its breath. Well, it hadn't been like that. Still, he had good hopes of
Marnie.

The Conversations At Curlew Creek

The year is 1827, and in a remote hut on the high plains of New South Wales, two strangers spend the night in talk. One, Carney, an illiterate Irishman, ex-convict and bushranger, is to be hanged at dawn. The other, Adair, also Irish, is the police officer who has been sent to supervise the hanging. As the night wears on, the two discover unexpected connections between their lives, and learn new truths. Outside the hut, Adair's troopers sit uneasily, reflecting on their own pasts and futures, waiting for the morning to come. With ironic humour and in prose of starkly evocative power, the novel moves between Australia and Ireland to explore questions of nature and justice, reason and un-reason, the workings of fate, and the small measure of freedom a man may claim in the face of death. A new novel by Malouf is a major event; The Conversations At Curlow Creek will confirm him as one of the greatest novelists of our time.

The Life of Prairies and Plains

As late as the 1880s, the Eskimo Curlew ( shown here in an Audubon painting)
moved northward over the prairies in huge ... That was the last of the Eskimo
curlews until 1945, when a sighting, again of a single bird, was made over
Galveston ...

The Life of Prairies and Plains

Set in 1491, this presents the life patterns of animals and plants of the grasslands of North America, including the circumstances surrounding the vanishing of wildlife from these regions.