Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure

A sanctioned biography of T. E. Lawrence, known popularly as "Lawrence of Arabia," this work by the eminent Robert Graves attempts to provide a fair and balanced treatment of the man.

Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure

A sanctioned biography of T. E. Lawrence, known popularly as "Lawrence of Arabia," this work by the eminent Robert Graves attempts to provide a fair and balanced treatment of the man. Based on interviews with Lawrence and his close associates, this account clearly displays its authenticity.

British Pan Arab Policy 1915 1922

The American edition is entitled, Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure (New York, 1928). Graves published separately all letters he had received from Lawrence, as well as all the interviews with him, in a volume under the title: T. E. ...

British Pan Arab Policy  1915 1922

In this myth-shattering study Isaiah Friedman provides a new perspective on events in the Middle East during World War I and its aftermath. He shows that British officials in Cairo mistakenly assumed that the Arabs would rebel against Turkey and welcome the British as deliverers. Sharif (later king) Hussein did rebel, but not for nationalistic motives as is generally presented in historiography. Early in the war he simultaneously negotiated with the British and the Turks but, after discovering that the Turks intended to assassinate him, finally sided with the British. There was no Arab Revolt in the Fertile Crescent. It was mainly the soldiers of Britain, the Commonwealth, and India that overthrew the Ottoman rule, not the Arabs. Both T.E. Lawrence ("Lawrence of Arabia") and Sir Mark Sykes hoped to revive the Arab nation and build a new Middle East. They courted disappointment: the Arabs resented the encroachment of European Powers and longed for the return of the Turks. Emir Feisal too became an exponent of Pan-Arabism and a proponent of the "United Syria" scheme. It was supported by the British Military Administration who wished thereby to eliminate the French from Syria. British officers were antagonistic to Zionism as well and were responsible for the anti-Jewish riots in Jerusalem in April 1920. During the twenties, unlike the Hussein family and their allies, the peasants (fellaheen), who constituted the majority of the Arab population in Palestine, were not inimical towards the Zionists. They maintained that "progress and prosperity lie in the path of brotherhood" between Arabs and Jews and regarded Jewish immigration and settlement to be beneficial to the country. Friedman argues that, if properly handled, the Arab-Zionist conflict was not inevitable. The responsibility lay in the hands of the British administration of Palestine.

Reader s Guide to Military History

Lawrence,. T.E.. lass-193;. British irregular solider Graves, Robert, Lawrence and the Arabs, London: Ionathan Cape, 1917; as Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure, New York: Doubleday, 1918 Graves, Robert and B.H. Liddell Hart, TE.

Reader s Guide to Military History

This book contains some 600 entries on a range of topics from ancient Chinese warfare to late 20th-century intervention operations. Designed for a wide variety of users, it encompasses general reviews of aspects of military organization and science, as well as specific wars and conflicts. The book examines naval and air warfare, as well as significant individuals, including commanders, theorists, and war leaders. Each entry includes a listing of additional publications on the topic, accompanied by an article discussing these publications with reference to their particular emphases, strengths, and limitations.

Lawrence of Arabia s Secret Dispatches during the Arab Revolt 1915 1919

Faulkner, Neil, Lawrence of Arabia's War: The Arabs, the British and the Remaking of the Middle East in WWI, New Haven, Yale University Press, 2017. ... Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure, New York, Doubleday, Doran & Co., 1928. —— (ed.) ...

Lawrence of Arabia  s Secret Dispatches during the Arab Revolt  1915  1919

T. E. Lawrence’s dispatches during the Arab Revolt have been published before, but only in an edited and incomplete form, as they were printed for a strictly limited wartime readership in the Arab Bulletin. Now, in this scholarly edition, they are published in full for the first time. They give us a direct inside view of his dealings with the Arab leaders and show us how he presented them to his superiors in Cairo. These wartime writings reveal vividly his impressions of the periods he spent in the desert and the conditions he found there, and they record how the Arab uprising developed and how he became increasingly involved in it. They make fascinating reading for, in his sometimes outspoken way, he reported on the military potential of the Arab fighters and recommended how they should be supported in their struggle against the Ottoman empire. This new collection of his dispatches is a valuable addition to the literature on Lawrence for it allows readers to trace the course of the revolt as he wrote about it at the time. They are printed in chronological order with full explanatory notes. The editor Fabrizio Bagatti provides a perceptive introduction which sets them in their wartime context, fills in the military and political background to the strategic situation in the Middle East and describes Lawrence’s important role as an intermediary between the Arabs and the British.

Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence' – explaining his approach to the film. It is in many ways an admirable exposition of ... I think that he is capable of capturing the drama and the mysticism of Lawrence's Arabian adventure ... Howard goes on to say that he has ...

Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence of Arabia is widely considered one of the ten greatest films ever made - though more often by film-goers and film-makers than by critics. This monograph argues that popular wisdom is correct, and that Lean's film is a unique blend of visionary image-making, narrative power, mythopoetic charm and psychological acuteness.

Robert Graves and the Classical Tradition

pragmatic instructions to read, then sell.7 Graves's biography of Lawrence, Lawrence and the Arabs, was similarly sanctioned ... as Lawrence and the Arabs (Jonathan Cape, 1927); in the United States as Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure ...

Robert Graves and the Classical Tradition

This collection of essays provides the latest scholarship on Graves' historical fiction (for example in I, Claudius and Count Belisarius) and his use of mythical figures in his poetry, as well as an examination of his controversial retelling of the Greek Myths.

Lawrence in Arabia

Lawrence's Arabian adventure had begun. LAWRENCE'S HUNCH ABOUT Ali proved absolutely correct; the eldest Hussein son was staggered when he was handed the letter from Abdullah dictating their father's permission for the young British ...

Lawrence in Arabia

The Arab Revolt against the Turks in World War One was, in the words of T.E. Lawrence, 'a sideshow of a sideshow'. Amidst the slaughter in European trenches, the Western combatants paid scant attention to the Middle Eastern theatre. As a result, the conflict was shaped to a remarkable degree by a small handful of adventurers and low-level officers far removed from the corridors of power. At the centre of it all was Lawrence. In early 1914 he was an archaeologist excavating ruins in the sands of Syria; by 1917 he was battling both the enemy and his own government to bring about the vision he had for the Arab people. Operating in the Middle East at the same time, but to wildly different ends, were three other important players: a German attaché, an American oilman and a committed Zionist. The intertwined paths of these four young men - the schemes they put in place, the battles they fought, the betrayals they endured and committed - mirror the grandeur, intrigue and tragedy of the war in the desert.

Epic Encounters

In it , Thomas depicted Lawrence , who spoke Arabic and frequently wore Arab dress , as a romantic adventurer and a military hero . ... Robert Graves's more sober account , Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure , was published in 1927.

Epic Encounters

"A wonderfully original and compelling study, essential for understanding the complex relations between the US and the nations and peoples of the Mideast. McAlister argues powerfully that American interests in the Mideast range far beyond the realm of foreign policy to become of paramount importance to the creation of American culture in the post World War II era. . . . A model for those interested in the interconnections of culture and foreign policy in an era of globalization. An engrossing read."--Amy Kaplan, author of The Social Construction of American Realism "Melani McAlister has written a marvelous book that draws together a vast array of materials from the media, archives, scholarly sources, and popular culture, interpreting it through her rich knowledge of cultural studies. Scholars in many fields--American studies, sociology, religious studies, political science, media studies, among others--will want to read this lively and engaging book."--Robert Wuthnow, author of After Heaven: Spirituality in America Since the 1950s, and Creative Spirituality: The Way of the Artist "A fascinating and completely original analysis of the relation between culture and foreign policy. . . this book casts entirely new light on US military, financial, and emotional investments in the Middle East. Conservative Christian sensibilities, television, Biblical epics, Black Power, and a host of gender-related representations--these and other factors all played a part in the shaping of American foreign policy in ways that have never before been noticed. No historian of twentieth-century American culture or politics should miss this brilliant book!"--Gail Bederman, author of Manliness and Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the US, 1880-1917 "Diplomatic historians are now turning to Edward Said's Orientalism to explore the cultural dimensions of 20th Century America's representations of the Middle East. They are too late! Melani McAlister develops a "post-orientalist" approach to U.S. culture, foreign policy, and identity. Hers is also the first book ever to recognize that African -Americans matter to such a project. Epic Encounters is a blockbuster of a book."--Robert Vitalis, author of When Capitalists Collide: Business Conflict and the End of Empire in Egypt

Spies in Arabia

A. W. Lawrence, 150; H. St. John B. Philby, Arabian Days: An Autobiography, 96, 113; Philby Papers: Philby, “Mesopotage ... quoted in Letters of T. E. Lawrence, 158; Soane, To Mesopotamia, 317; D. Carruthers, Arabian Adventure, 28; ...

Spies in Arabia

In this groundbreaking book, Priya Satia tracks the intelligence community's tactical grappling with this problem and the myriad cultural, institutional, and political consequences of their methodological choices during and after the Great War.

Soldier Heroes

British Adventure, Empire and the Imagining of Masculinities Graham Dawson ... Lawrence's Arabian adventure can be seen to meet a widespread desire for the reassertion of a heroic British identity to set against the destruction not only ...

Soldier Heroes

Soldier Heroes explores the imagining of masculinities within adventure stories. Drawing on literary theory, cultural materialism and Kleinian psychoanalysis, it analyses modern British adventure heroes as historical forms of masculinity originating in the era of nineteenth-century popular imperialism, traces their subsequent transformations and examines the way these identities are internalized and lived by men and boys.

Modernism Reconsidered

The same element of self - mastery may help explain the presence in the book of Mallory and T. E. Lawrence , who are placed so as to bracket Graves's war ... Robert Graves , Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure ( Garden City , N.Y .

Modernism Reconsidered


Encyclopedia of Life Writing

... Marie-Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de301, 333, 335, 953 Lafcadio's Adventures (Gide) 377 Lagerkvist, ... Johann Kaspar367 Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure (Graves) 403 Lawrence and the Arabs (Graves) 403 Lawrence of ...

Encyclopedia of Life Writing

This is the first substantial reference work in English on the various forms that constitute "life writing." As this term suggests, the Encyclopedia explores not only autobiography and biography proper, but also letters, diaries, memoirs, family histories, case histories, and other ways in which individual lives have been recorded and structured. It includes entries on genres and subgenres, national and regional traditions from around the world, and important auto-biographical writers, as well as articles on related areas such as oral history, anthropology, testimonies, and the representation of life stories in non-verbal art forms.

Reel Bad Arabs

Instead, an imam reads from the Holy Koran; and Faisal reects on Arab contributions to society. ... A guide is not killed at the well and, of course, Lawrence does not begin his Arabian adventure with an angry tirade on desert customs ...

Reel Bad Arabs

A groundbreaking book that dissects a slanderous history dating from cinema’s earliest days to contemporary Hollywood blockbusters that feature machine-gun wielding and bomb-blowing "evil" Arabs Award-winning film authority Jack G. Shaheen, noting that only Native Americans have been more relentlessly smeared on the silver screen, painstakingly makes his case that "Arab" has remained Hollywood’s shameless shorthand for "bad guy," long after the movie industry has shifted its portrayal of other minority groups. In this comprehensive study of over one thousand films, arranged alphabetically in such chapters as "Villains," "Sheikhs," "Cameos," and "Cliffhangers," Shaheen documents the tendency to portray Muslim Arabs as Public Enemy #1—brutal, heartless, uncivilized Others bent on terrorizing civilized Westerners. Shaheen examines how and why such a stereotype has grown and spread in the film industry and what may be done to change Hollywood’s defamation of Arabs.

Words and Images on the Screen

... colonial and/or government processes.6 However, for your Arabian adventure, the Wadi Rum – Lawrence of Arabia ”nostalgic experience” – you will find the tour entirely run by a Bedouin – an Indigenous who remained tied to the land.

Words and Images on the Screen

The screen has never been merely a canvas for the images to be displayed but also – to quote Jean-Luc Godard – “a blank page”, a surface for inscriptions and a “stage” for all kinds of linguistic occurrences be their audible or visual. Word did not come into the world of cinema at the time of the talkies but has been a primordial medial “companion” that has shaped the cinematic experience from its very beginnings. This volume offers a collection of essays that question the role of words and images in the context of moving pictures covering a wide area of their interconnectedness. How can we analyse literary adaptations? What is the role of adaptations in the evolution of specific national cinemas? In what way are written texts used in films? Is the model of the word and image relations used in silent films still applicable today? What major paradigms can be discerned within the multiplicity of ways Jean-Luc Godard’s cinema plays with words and images? Are these models of modernist or postmodern cinema reflected in films of other directors like R. W. Fassbinder? How do avant-garde works deal with the word and image debate? What are the connections of animation or computer games with verbal text and narrative? What is the phenomenon of jet-setting and how does it connect to the ideological implications of the relations between the culture of books and films? What happens when Hamlet is completely rewritten reflecting the ideology of late capitalism? What happens from the point of view of literariness or rejection of literariness when films are made vehicles of national propaganda? How do words get mediated through images? These are some of the questions addressed in the present volume by in-depth case studies of cinematic intermediality or more general surveys regarding cinema’s long lasting liaisons with language or literature.

Empire and Popular Culture

Lawrence's Arabian adventure can be seen to have met a what Dawson notes as the 'widespread desire for the reassertion of a heroic English-British identity to set against the destruction not only of life but of meaning, ...

Empire and Popular Culture

From 1830, if not before, the Empire began to permeate the domestic culture of Empire nations in many ways. From consumables, to the excitement of colonial wars, celebrations relating to events in the history of Empire, and the construction of Empire Day in the early Edwardian period, most citizens were encouraged to think of themselves not only as citizens of a nation but of an Empire. Much of the popular culture of the period presented Empire as a force for ‘civilisation’ but it was often far from the truth and rather, Empire was a repressive mechanism designed ultimately to benefit white settlers and the metropolitan economy. This four volume collection on Empire and Popular Culture contains a wide array of primary sources, complimented by editorial narratives which help the reader to understand the significance of the documents contained therein. It is informed by the recent advocacy of a ‘four-nation’ approach to Empire containing documents which view Empire from the perspective of England, Scotland Ireland and Wales and will also contain material produced for Empire audiences, as well as indigenous perspectives. The sources reveal both the celebratory and the notorious sides of Empire. In this, the third volume of Empire and Popular Culture, documents are presented that shed light on three principal themes: The shaping of personal. collective and national identities of British citizens by the Empire; the commemoration of individuals and collective groups who were noted for their roles in Empire building; and finally, the way in which the Empire entered popular culture by means of trade with the Empire and the goods that were imported.

Reader s Guide to British History

1914–1918 Aldington, Richard, Lawrence of Arabia: A Biographical Enquiry, London: Collins, and Chicago: Regnery, ... 1940 Graves, Robert, Lawrence and the Arabs, London: Jonathan Cape, 1927; as Lawrence and the Arabian Adventure, ...

Reader s Guide to British History

The Reader's Guide to British History is the essential source to secondary material on British history. This resource contains over 1,000 A-Z entries on the history of Britain, from ancient and Roman Britain to the present day. Each entry lists 6-12 of the best-known books on the subject, then discusses those works in an essay of 800 to 1,000 words prepared by an expert in the field. The essays provide advice on the range and depth of coverage as well as the emphasis and point of view espoused in each publication.

Manful Assertions

By narrating the story of Lawrence's involvement with the Arabian Revolt as an adventure , Thomas was able to imagine him as a man whose knowledges , skills and physical abilities ...

Manful Assertions

Masculine assertions, whether of verbal command, political power or physical violence, have formed the traditional subject matter of history. This volume combines current discussions in sexual politics with historical analysis to demonstrate that, far from being natural and monolithic, masculinity is an historical and cultural construct, with varied, competing and above all changing forms.

Kingmakers The Invention of the Modern Middle East

TheStory oftheArab Legion. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1948. ———. ... Graves,Philip. TheLife of SirPercy Cox.London: Hutchinson & Co.,Ltd., 1941.Graves, Robert. Lawrence andthe Arabian Adventure. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, ...

Kingmakers  The Invention of the Modern Middle East

A brilliant narrative history tracing today’s troubles back to the grandiose imperial overreach of Great Britain and the United States. Kingmakers is the gripping story of how the modern Middle East came to be, as told through the lives of the Britons and Americans who shaped it. Some are famous (Lawrence of Arabia and Gertrude Bell); others infamous (Harry St. John Philby, father of Kim); some forgotten (Sir Mark Sykes, Israel’s godfather, and A. T. Wilson, the territorial creator of Iraq). All helped enthrone rulers in a region whose very name is an Anglo-American invention. The aim of this engrossing character-driven narrative is to restore to life the colorful figures who gave us the Middle East in which Americans are enmeshed today.

Literature of Travel and Exploration

Lawrence's Arabian adventure shaped, broadened, but also scarred his identity. The book chronicles the gradual loss of landmarks, of boundaries—both moral and physical—of his self. Finally, it is a very lucidly written account of the ...

Literature of Travel and Exploration

Containing more than 600 entries, this valuable resource presents all aspects of travel writing. There are entries on places and routes (Afghanistan, Black Sea, Egypt, Gobi Desert, Hawaii, Himalayas, Italy, Northwest Passage, Samarkand, Silk Route, Timbuktu), writers (Isabella Bird, Ibn Battuta, Bruce Chatwin, Gustave Flaubert, Mary Kingsley, Walter Ralegh, Wilfrid Thesiger), methods of transport and types of journey (balloon, camel, grand tour, hunting and big game expeditions, pilgrimage, space travel and exploration), genres (buccaneer narratives, guidebooks, New World chronicles, postcards), companies and societies (East India Company, Royal Geographical Society, Society of Dilettanti), and issues and themes (censorship, exile, orientalism, and tourism). For a full list of entries and contributors, a generous selection of sample entries, and more, visit the Literature of Travel and Exploration: An Encyclopedia website.