Learning about Winter with Children s Literature

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE/LITERATURE Grades K-3 hat better way to
capitalize on students' enthusiasm for picture books than to build thematic units
around classic works of children's literature? learning About Winter with
Children's ...

Learning about Winter with Children s Literature

Presents three four-week, cross-curricular units on winter that are built around children's literature.

Children s Literature and Learner Empowerment

Lütge, Christiane (2012), 'Developing “literary literacy”? Towards a progression
of literary learning', in Maria Eisenmann and Theresa Summer (eds), Basic
Issues in EFL Teaching and Learning. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, pp.

Children s Literature and Learner Empowerment

Children's literature can be a powerful way to encourage and empower EFL students but is less commonly used in the classroom than adult literature. This text provides a comprehensive introduction to children's and young adult literature in EFL teaching. It demonstrates the complexity of children's literature and how it can encourage an active community of second language readers: with multilayered picturebooks, fairy tales, graphic novels and radical young adult fiction. It examines the opportunities of children's literature in EFL teacher education, including: the intertexuality of children's literature as a gate-opener for canonised adult literature; the rich patterning of children's literature supporting Creative Writing; the potential of interactive drama projects. Close readings of texts at the centre of contemporary literary scholarship, yet largely unknown in the EFL world, provide an invaluable guide for teacher educators and student teachers, including works by David Almond, Anthony Browne, Philip Pullman and J.K.Rowling. Introducing a range of genres and their significance for EFL teaching, this study makes an important new approach accessible for EFL teachers, student teachers and teacher educators.

Children s Literature in Second Language Education

Eisenmann, M. (2012), 'Introduction: Heterogeneity and differentiation', in M.
Eisenmann and T. Summer (eds), Basic Issues in EFL Teaching and Learning.
Heidelberg: Winter, 297–310. Eller, U. and Grimm, W. (2008): Individuelle
Lernpläne ...

Children s Literature in Second Language Education

Bringing together leading scholars and teacher educators from across the world, from Europe and the USA to Asia, this book presents the latest research and new perspectives into the uses of children's literature in second language teaching for children and young adults. Children's Literature in Second Language Education covers such topics as extensive reading, creative writing in the language classroom, the use of picturebooks and graphic novels in second language teaching and the potential of children's literature in promoting intercultural education. The focus throughout the book is on creative approaches to language teaching, from early years through to young adult learners, making this book an essential read for those studying or embarking on second language teaching at all levels.

The Perry Magazine

... far reaching good of those winter evenings with the cherished book, when the
child's imagination learned to reach out ... business of the winter days, after the
early supper and the evening lamps are lighted, to gather the children around the
 ...

The Perry Magazine


Perry Magazine

... that of parents and the and estimate : but who can calculate the brothers and
sisters of the children , as far reaching good of those winter evenings well . They
must learn the fine art of with the cherished book , when the child's “ story telling .

Perry Magazine


Stimulating Story Writing

Available at: www.nypl.org/blog/2014/07/22/around-world-childrens-books (
accessed: 11 January 2014). ... Available at: www. viauc.com/schools-faculties/
faculty-of-education-and-social-studies/Documents/exchangeprogrammes/
Animation-as-a-Learning-Tool.pdf (accessed: 16 ... Winter, J.K. and Winter, E.J. (
2009) A Study of the Effect of Paper Color on Test Performance in Business
Communication.

Stimulating Story Writing

Stimulating Story Writing! Inspiring Children aged 7-11 offers innovative and exciting ways to inspire children to want to create stories and develop their story writing skills. This practical guide offers comprehensive and informed support for professionals to effectively engage ‘child authors’ in stimulating story writing activity. Packed full of story ideas, resource suggestions and practical activities, the book explores various ways professionals can help children to develop the six key elements of story, these being character, setting, plot, conflict, resolution and ending. All of the ideas in the book are designed to complement and enrich existing writing provision in classrooms with strategies such as role play, the use of different technologies, and using simple open ended resources as story stimuli. Separated into two sections and with reference to the Key Stage 2 curricula, this timely new text provides professionals with tried and tested strategies and ideas that can be used with immediate effect. Chapters include: • Creating Characters • The Plot Thickens • Inspired Ideas • Resourcing the Story Stimulation This timely new text is the perfect guide for inspiring children aged 7-11 in the classroom and will be an essential resource for teachers and students on teacher training courses.

Proceedings

Lum- proportion of the children have to learn English mis has some good Indian
stories which I besides learning to read , and I find ... of coal , " by E. A. Martin ,
are not beyond the read German if we had studied it one winter . child who likes
to read about such things . R. G. THWAITES . — Are these children's books
Scudder's books on butterflies certainly need no written and published and
bought by our ...

Proceedings


Papers and Proceedings of the General Meeting of the American Library Association Held at

Lum- proportion of the children have to learn English mis has some good Indian
stories which I besides learning to read , and I find ... of coal , ” by E. A. Martin ,
are not beyond the read German if we had studied it one winter . child who likes
to read about such things . R. G , THWAITES . - Are these children's books
Scudder's books on butterflies certainly need no written and published and
bought by our ...

Papers and Proceedings of the     General Meeting of the American Library Association Held at


Audacious Kids

Teaching and Learning Literature (January/February 1996): 25– 30. ———. ...
Review of Kiddie Lit: The Cultural Construction of Children's Literature in America
, by Beverly Lyon Clark. Children's ... 4 (Winter 2003– 2004): 248– 49. ———.

Audacious Kids

Outstanding Book of the Year Award, Children’s Literature Association Often called the Golden Age of Children’s Books, the years stretching from the Civil War to World War I were a remarkable epoch in juvenile literature, an era when the best authors on both sides of the Atlantic wrote some of their finest work primarily for children. In Audacious Kids, Jerry Griswold provides a groundbreaking and lucid study of twelve of these classic American children’s tales, including such time-honored stories as Little Women, Tom Sawyer, The Secret Garden, and The Wizard of Oz. Griswold’s most remarkable insight is that, fundamentally, these twelve books all tell essentially the same story: a child is orphaned, makes a journey, is adopted and harassed by adults, and eventually triumphs over them and comes into his or her own. Griswold, a leading figure in the study of children’s literature, also reveals that these tales emphasize motifs that are distinctly American, such as positive thinking, concern with health, and the concealment of sex and violence, and he shows how these secular parables replaced religion with psychology and preached gospels of emotional self-control and optimism. In this revised edition, which is aimed at students, scholars, and general readers, Griswold has updated the text throughout and added a new preface, introduction, and select bibliography.

Resources in Education

ED 239 205 ED 239 716 ED 239 34 The Mishomis Book : The Voice of the
Ojibway . ... Classroom Communication ED 239 826 // ED 239 717 A
Performance Curriculum and Learning Os Childrens Responses ... Classroom
Ideas Winter 1982.

Resources in Education


Appalachian Children s Literature

Appalachian children's literature became important to me in the 1980s when I
was teaching a general survey of children's ... out of a library— in my own name
— were Robert Lawson's marvelous fantasies Rabbit Hill and The Tough Winter.

Appalachian Children  s Literature

This comprehensive bibliography includes books written about or set in Appalachia from the 18th century to the present. Titles represent the entire region as defined by the Appalachian Regional Commission, including portions of 13 states stretching from southern New York to northern Mississippi. The bibliography is arranged in alphabetical order by author, and each title is accompanied by an annotation, most of which include composite reviews and critical analyses of the work. All classic genres of children’s literature are represented.

Masculinity and Emotion in Early Modern English Literature

role in the education of children . Throughout The Winter ' s Tale men and boys
learn to respond with affection instead of anxiety to women and the passionate
agency they embody . This play ultimately celebrates emotionally expressive
men ...

Masculinity and Emotion in Early Modern English Literature

Offering new readings of works by Shakespeare, Spenser, and their contemporaries, this study examines the profound impact of the cultural shift in the English aristocracy from feudal warriors to emotionally expressive courtiers or gentlemen on all kinds of men in early modern English literature. Jennifer Vaught traces the gradual emergence of men of feeling during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, to the blossoming of this literary version of manhood during the eighteenth century.

Critical Perspectives on Postcolonial African Children s and Young Adult Literature

"Death in Children's Literature: Taboo or Not Taboo." Children's Literature
Association Quarterly 16.4 (Winter 1991): 232-34. Hildebrand, Anne Meizen.
Jean and Laurent de Brunhoff: The Legacy ofBabar. New York: Twayne, 1991.
Kohl ...

Critical Perspectives on Postcolonial African Children s and Young Adult Literature

The past few years mark a growing scholarly interest in African children's literature in the United States. Several books on the topic have been published, and the number of articles has also increased. Recent publications have been moving away from general country surveys or studies of publishing conditions to works that analyze literary structures, themes, and illustrations or that apply Marxist, feminist, or postcolonial theories to interpret the literature. The essays in this volume either approach colonial African children's literature from a postcolonial or revisionist perspective, or discuss books published after decolonization.

Science Through Children s Literature

Preface In 1989, we published the first edition of Science Through Children's
Literature. ... Children use the knowledge they gain through reading as a
foundation for studying academic content in the ... Sadie and the Snowman
chronicles events of the long winter, as does The Big Snow, and the poems of
Space Songs have ...

Science Through Children s Literature

This groundbreaking, critically acclaimed, and best-selling resource features more than 30 exciting instructional units that integrate all areas of the curriculum and serve as models to educators at all levels. Adopted as a supplementary text in schools of education nationwide, this resource features outstanding children's fiction books that are rich in scientific concepts yet equally well known for their strong story lines and universal appeal.

Historical Fiction for Young Readers grades 4 8

In The Continuum Encyclopedia of Children's Literature (Continuum, 2001),
Janelle B. Mathis writes, “Bruchac's Native American heritage and his interest in
its ... The Winter People takes place over a period of a few weeks in the fall of
1759.

Historical Fiction for Young Readers  grades 4 8

Presents an introduction to historical fiction for readers in grades four through eight, listing eighty titles of works for this age group and providing plot summaries, characters, historical background, and selected passages for discussion.

Space and Place in Children s Literature 1789 to the Present

rudd, david Bakhtinian reading of space between children and adults 21–2
ruotolo, renato 72 Rupert Bear 17 Ruskin, John 181, ... travel narrative 125
reworked for children 151, 153, 161 Tempest, The 120 Shavit, Zohar 80 Shrek 2
82 shu, deng Learning to Read and ... robert louis A Child's Garden of Verses
156–8 'Foreign Lands' 156 'the Land of Story Books' 157–8 'Picture Books in
Winter' 158 'the ...

Space and Place in Children   s Literature  1789 to the Present

Focusing on questions of space and locale in children’s literature, this collection explores how metaphorical and physical space can create landscapes of power, knowledge, and identity in texts from the early nineteenth century to the present. The collection is comprised of four sections that take up the space between children and adults, the representation of 'real world' places, fantasy travel and locales, and the physical space of the children’s book-as-object. In their essays, the contributors analyze works from a range of sources and traditions by authors such as Sylvia Plath, Maria Edgeworth, Gloria Anzaldúa, Jenny Robson, C.S. Lewis, Elizabeth Knox, and Claude Ponti. While maintaining a focus on how location and spatiality aid in defining the child’s relationship to the world, the essays also address themes of borders, displacement, diaspora, exile, fantasy, gender, history, home-leaving and homecoming, hybridity, mapping, and metatextuality. With an epilogue by Philip Pullman in which he discusses his own relationship to image and locale, this collection is also a valuable resource for understanding the work of this celebrated author of children’s literature.

Feeling Like a Kid

Childhood and Children's Literature Jerry Griswold, Jerome Griswold, Professor
of English and Comparative Literature Jerry Griswold. Griswold , Jerry . ...
Between Cultures : Heidi and The Secret Garden , ” Teaching and Learning
Literature , March / April 1996 , 26-29 . “ Burdening ... 4 ( Winter 2003–2004 ) :
248–249 . - .

Feeling Like a Kid

In this engaging and reflective essay, Jerry Griswold examines the unique qualities of childhood experience and their reappearance as frequent themes in children’s literature. Surveying dozens of classic and popular works for the young—from Heidi and The Wizard of Oz to Beatrix Potter and Harry Potter—Griswold demonstrates how great children's writers succeed because of their uncanny ability to remember what it feels like to be a kid: playing under tables, shivering in bed on a scary night, arranging miniature worlds with toys, zooming around as caped superheroes, listening to dolls talk. No softheaded discussion of kids’ “cute” convictions nor a developmentally-focused critique of their “immature” beliefs, Feeling Like a Kid boldly and honestly identifies the ways in which the young think and see the world in a manner different from that of adults. Written by a leading scholar, prize-winning author, and frequent contributor to the Los Angeles Times, this extensively illustrated book will fascinate general readers as well as all those who study childhood and children's literature.

Knowing Their Place Identity and Space in Children s Literature

CHILDREN'S. LITERATURE. JANET. GRAFTON. The way people interact with
the natural world is changing with every ... in a healing environment is similar in
all three stories: Mary's transformation begins in winter and ends in late summer;
 ...

Knowing Their Place  Identity and Space in Children   s Literature

Traditionally in the West, children were expected to “know their place,” but what does this comprise in a contemporary, globalized world? Does it mean to continue to accept subordination to those larger and more powerful? Does it mean to espouse unthinkingly a notion of national identity? Or is it about gaining an awareness of the ways in which identity is derived from a sense of place? Where individuals are situated matters as much if not more than it ever has. In children’s literature, the physical places and psychological spaces inhabited by children and young adults are also key elements in the developing identity formation of characters and, through engagement, of readers too. The contributors to this collection map a broad range of historical and present-day workings of this process: exploring indigeneity and place, tracing the intertwining of place and identity in diasporic literature, analyzing the relationship of the child to the natural world, and studying the role of fantastic spaces in children’s construction of the self. They address fresh topics and texts, ranging from the indigenization of the Gothic by Canadian mixed-blood Anishinabe writer Drew Hayden Taylor to the lesser-known children’s books of George Mackay Brown, to eco-feminist analysis of contemporary verse novels. The essays on more canonical texts, such as Peter Pan and the Harry Potter series, provide new angles from which to revision them. Readers of this collection will gain understanding of the complex interactions of place, space, and identity in children’s literature. Essays in this book will appeal to those interested in Children’s Literature, Aboriginal Studies, Environmentalism and literature, and Fantasy literature.

Shakespeare as Children s Literature

Today's Shakespeare industry designs verbal and visual texts for children who
live in a vastly di›erent world from that ... A Midsummer Night's Dream, Richard III,
Hamlet, The Tempest, Julius Caesar, Twelfth Night, Othello, The Winter's Tale), ...
Films are outside this study's scope, but several recent books of Shakespeare
stories that combine verbal and visual texts a›ord apt comparison with
Edwardians.

Shakespeare as Children s Literature

Although William Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language, he traditionally receives little notice in studies of children's literature. However, there is a fascinating relationship between Shakespeare and children's interests, and the Bard's works have been successfully adapted for children's use over several centuries. This book continues and parallels the author's previous study, Chaucer as Children's Literature, as part of a greater endeavor to evaluate the significance of traditional literature retold as children's literature in modern English studies. It examines the ways in which William Shakespeare's stories have been adapted for children, particularly in Mary and Charles Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare, which was almost immediately recognized as a classic of children's literature when it was first published in 1807. The author describes the significance of the Lamb's Tales as the pre-eminent children's adaptation of Shakespeare's literature, focusing particularly on the lavishly illustrated Edwardian editions which used pictures to convey Shakespeare's stories for children. Other topics include Victorian alternatives to the Lambs' stories, including anthologies from David Murray Smith, Abby Sage Richardson, and Mary Seymour; the lavish illustrations of Shakespeare's stories found in antique English textbooks; Shakespeare in nursery books, including sophisticated collections from Mary Macleod, Thomas Carter, Alice S. Hoffman, and other noted authors; and Shakespeare in multi-volume American collections, including The Children's Hour, Journeys through Bookland, and The Junior Classics.