Learning Latin the Ancient Way

These stories provide priceless insight into daily life in the Roman empire, as well as into how Latin was learned at that period, and they were all written by Romans in Latin that was designed to be easy for beginners to understand.

Learning Latin the Ancient Way

What did Greek speakers in the Roman empire do when they wanted to learn Latin? They used Latin-learning materials containing authentic, enjoyable vignettes about daily life in the ancient world - shopping, banking, going to the baths, having fights, being scolded, making excuses - very much like the dialogues in some of today's foreign-language textbooks. These stories provide priceless insight into daily life in the Roman empire, as well as into how Latin was learned at that period, and they were all written by Romans in Latin that was designed to be easy for beginners to understand. Learners also used special beginners' versions of great Latin authors including Virgil and Cicero, and dictionaries, grammars, texts in Greek transliteration, etc. All these materials are now available for the first time to today's students, in a book designed to complement modern textbooks and enrich the Latin-learning experience.

Stories of Daily Life from the Roman World

This book provides English translations of newly discovered texts in an easily understandable presentation, with extensive illustrations.

Stories of Daily Life from the Roman World

This book provides English translations of newly discovered texts in an easily understandable presentation, with extensive illustrations.

Forward with Classics

Classical Languages in Schools and Communities Arlene Holmes-Henderson, Steven Hunt, Mai Musié. schools and universities 'public ... Colloquia Stephani, in the book Learning Latin the Ancient Way by Eleanor Dickey (2016, pp. 18–19).

Forward with Classics

Despite their removal from England's National Curriculum in 1988, and claims of elitism, Latin and Greek are increasingly re-entering the 'mainstream' educational arena. Since 2012, there have been more students in state-maintained schools in England studying classical subjects than in independent schools, and the number of schools offering Classics continues to rise in the state-maintained sector. The teaching and learning of Latin and Greek is not, however, confined to the classroom: community-based learning for adults and children is facilitated in newly established regional Classics hubs in evenings and at weekends, in universities as part of outreach, and even in parks and in prisons. This book investigates the motivations of teachers and learners behind the rise of Classics in the classroom and in communities, and explores ways in which knowledge of classical languages is considered valuable for diverse learners in the 21st century. The role of classical languages within the English educational policy landscape is examined, as new possibilities exist for introducing Latin and Greek into school curricula. The state of Classics education internationally is also investigated, with case studies presenting the status quo in policy and practice from Australasia, North America, the rest of Europe and worldwide. The priorities for the future of Classics education in these diverse locations are compared and contrasted by the editors, who conjecture what strategies are conducive to success.

From Glosses to Dictionaries

Previous studies have emphasized that within such an approach the core of the method is expanding vocabulary and basic phraseology as a prelude for developing ... Learning Latin the Ancient Way. Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World.

From Glosses to Dictionaries

This book presents—through a series of nine high quality essays by international scholars—the beginnings of the lexicographic tradition and the appearance of the first mono- and multilingual dictionaries in various language areas across the world, paying particular attention to their dependence on glosses and glossaries. The contributions analyze, on the basis of significant case studies, how dictionaries first emerged in a wide spectrum of cultures, ranging from Greek Antiquity to 9th-century Japan, from Medieval Britain to 15th-century Poland. In this way, the book highlights both similarities and differences among these traditions, and allows a global and comparative approach to the history of lexicography in its earliest phases, a topic which, up until now, has usually been studied only within single languages and cultures.

The Languages of Early Medieval Charters

It appears to have involved a certain amount of writing and alphabet learning, as well as learning from oral ... in the copy 99 Eleanor Dickey, Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World (Cambridge, 2016).

The Languages of Early Medieval Charters

This is the first major study of the interplay between Latin and Germanic vernaculars in early medieval records, examining the role of language choice in the documentary cultures of the Anglo-Saxon and eastern Frankish worlds.

Critics Compilers and Commentators

Dickey, E. (2016a), Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World (Cambridge). Dickey, E. (2016b), "The Authorship of the Greek Version of Dositheus' Grammar and What It Tells Us about the Grammar's Original Use ...

Critics  Compilers  and Commentators

"To teach correct Latin and to explain the poets" were the two standard duties of Roman teachers. Not only was a command of literary Latin a prerequisite for political and social advancement, but a sense of Latin's history and importance contributed to the Romans' understanding of their own cultural identity. Put plainly, philology-the study of language and texts-was important at Rome. Critics, Compilers, and Commentators is the first comprehensive introduction to the history, forms, and texts of Roman philology. James Zetzel traces the changing role and status of Latin as revealed in the ways it was explained and taught by the Romans themselves. In addition, he provides a descriptive bibliography of hundreds of scholarly texts from antiquity, listing editions, translations, and secondary literature. Recovering a neglected but crucial area of Roman intellectual life, this book will be an essential resource for students of Roman literature and intellectual history, medievalists, and historians of education and language science.

Italy Before Rome

Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/ CBO9781316145265. Eichner, Heiner. 2011. Anmerkungen zum Etruskischen in memoriam Helmut Rix.

Italy Before Rome

This book brings together sources translated from a wide variety of ancient languages to showcase the rich history of pre-Roman Italy, including its cultures, politics, trade, languages, writing systems, religious rituals, magical practices, and conflicts. This book allows readers to access diverse sources relating to the history and cultures of pre-Roman Italy. It gathers and translates sources from both Greek and Latin literature and ancient inscriptions in multiple languages and gives commentary to highlight areas of particular interest. The thematic organisation of this sourcebook helps readers to make connections across languages and communities, and showcases the interconnectedness of ancient Italy. This book includes maps, a timeline, and guides to further reading, making it accessible to students and other readers who are new to this subject. Italy Before Rome is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students, including those who have not studied the ancient world before. It is also intended to be useful to researchers approaching this material for the first time, and to university and schoolteachers looking for an overview of early Italian sources.

Scholastic Culture in the Hellenistic and Roman Eras

Learning Latin the ancient way: Latin textbooks from the ancient world. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Diels/Kranz (1952): Diels, Hermann, and Walther Kranz. Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker (6th edn). Berlin: Weidmann.

Scholastic Culture in the Hellenistic and Roman Eras

The purpose of this volume is to investigate scholastic culture in the Hellenistic and Roman eras, with a particular focus on ancient book and material culture as well as scholarship beyond Greek authors and the Greek language. Accordingly, one of the major contributions of this work is the inclusion of multiple perspectives and its contributors engage not only with elements of Greek scholastic culture, but also bring Greek ideas into conversation with developing Latin scholarship (see chapters by Dickey, Nicholls, Marshall) and the perspective of a minority culture (i.e., Jewish authors) (see chapters by Hezser, Adams). This multicultural perspective is an important next step in the discussion of ancient scholarship and this volume provides a starting point for future inquiries.

Law in the Roman Provinces

Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge. Frei-Stolba, R., B. Hartmann, and C. Roms (2016). Vadimonium Nertae. Zum römischen Privatrecht in den gallischen Provinzen. Tyche 31, pp. 149–55.

Law in the Roman Provinces

The study of the Roman Empire has changed dramatically in the last century, with significant emphasis now placed on understanding the experiences of subject populations, rather than a sole focus on the Roman imperial elites. Local experiences, and interactions between periphery and centre, are an intrinsic component in our understanding of the empire's function over and against the earlier, top-down model. But where does law fit into this new, decentralized picture of empire? This volume brings together internationally renowned scholars from both legal and historical backgrounds to study the operation of law in each region of the Roman Empire, from Britain to Egypt, from the first century BCE to the end of the third century CE. Regional specificities are explored in detail alongside the emergence of common themes and activities in a series of case studies that together reveal a new and wide-ranging picture of law in the Roman Empire, balancing the practicalities of regional variation with the ideological constructs of law and empire.

Rome and the Invention of the Papacy

Dey, H. (2019), 'Politics, patronage and the transmission of construction techniques in early medieval Rome c.650–750', PBSR 87, pp. 177–206. Dickey, E. (2016), Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World ...

Rome and the Invention of the Papacy

The first full study of the most remarkable history of the early popes and their relationship with Rome, the Liber pontificalis.

Languages scripts and Chinese texts in East Asia

Classical world literatures: Sino-Japanese and Greco-Roman comparisons (New York: Oxford University Press). — 2014b. ... Learning Latin the ancient way: Latin textbooks from the ancient world (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).

Languages  scripts  and Chinese texts in East Asia

Chinese Writing and the Rise of the Vernacular in East Asia is a wide-ranging study of vernacularization in East Asia - not only China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, but also societies that no longer exist, such as the Tangut and Khitan empires. Peter Kornicki takes the reader from the early centuries of the common era, when the Chinese script was the only form of writing and Chinese Buddhist, Confucian, and medical texts spread throughout East Asia, through the centuries when vernacular scripts evolved, right up to the end of the nineteenth century when nationalism created new roles for vernacular languages and vernacular scripts. Through an examination of oral approaches to Chinese texts, it shows how highly-valued Chinese texts came to be read through the prism of the vernaculars and ultimately to be translated. This long process has some parallels with vernacularization in Europe, but a crucial difference is that literary Chinese was, unlike Latin, not a spoken language. As a consequence, people who spoke different East Asian vernaculars had no means of communicating in speech, but they could communicate silently by means of written conversation in literary Chinese; a further consequence is that within each society Chinese texts assumed vernacular garb: in classes and lectures, Chinese texts were read and declaimed in the vernaculars. What happened in the nineteenth century and why are there still so many different scripts in East Asia? How and why were Chinese texts dethroned, and what replaced them? These are some of the questions addressed in Chinese Writing and the Rise of the Vernacular in East Asia.

Rethinking TESOL in Diverse Global Settings

Dickey, E. (2016), Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ding, Y.-R. (2007), “Text Memorization and Imitation: The Practices of Successful Chinese Learners of ...

Rethinking TESOL in Diverse Global Settings

Shortlisted for the BAAL Book Prize 2020 What do TESOL teachers actually teach? What do they know about language, about English and the ways it is used in the world? How do they view themselves and their work, and how are they viewed by others? How is TESOL perceived as a profession and as a discipline? How can teachers make the most of the available resources? Can global English really deliver what it seems to promise? These are some of the questions explored in Rethinking TESOL in Diverse Global Settings, a book which examines what we mean when we talk about English language teaching and what we understand the job of an English language teacher to be. Covering diverse teaching environments, from China to Latin America and the Middle East, and from elementary school to university, the authors take a critical look at TESOL by focusing on the actual substance of the subject, language, and attitudes towards it. Through concrete examples from language classrooms, in the form of vignettes and accounts from native speaker and non-native speaker teachers alike, they explore the experiences of teachers worldwide in relation to issues of identity and professionalism, nativeness and non-nativeness, and the pressures of dealing with the expectations with which English has become invested. While recognising the often precarious academic and institutional status of TESOL teachers, the book pulls no punches in challenging those teachers as a whole to become more ambitious in their aims, positioning themselves not as mere skills providers, but language experts, specialists in their subject, members of a legitimate academic discipline. Only then, the authors argue, will TESOL teachers and their work be taken seriously and their expertise recognised.

Grammar

Learning Latin the ancient way: Latin textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dulay, H. C., & Burt, M. K. (1974). Natural sequences in child second language acquisition. Language Learning, 24, 37–53.

Grammar

Traditionally, there has been a disconnect between theoretical linguistics and pedagogical teacher training. This book seeks to bridge that gap. Using engaging examples from a wide variety of languages, it provides an innovative overview of linguistic theory and language acquisition research for readers with a background in education and teacher training, and without specialist knowledge of the field. The authors draw on a range of research to ground ideas about grammar pedagogy, presenting the notion of Virtual Grammar as an accessible label for unifying the complexity of linguistics. Organised thematically, the book includes helpful 'Case in point' examples throughout the text, to illustrate specific grammar points, and step-by-step training in linguistic methods, such as how to analyse examples, which educators can apply to their own teaching contexts. Through enriching language teachers' understanding of linguistic features, the book fosters a different perspective on grammar for educators.

Man of High Empire

Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks form the Ancient World, Cambridge. Dickson, K. 2009. 'Oneself as others: Aurelius and autobiography', Arethusa 42:99–125. Dix, T. K. 1996. 'Pliny's library at Comum', Reading & Libraries ...

Man of High Empire

Pliny the Younger (c. 60-112 C.E.)--senator and consul in the Rome of emperors Domitian and Trajan, eyewitness to the eruption of Vesuvius in 79, and early 'persecutor' of Christians on the Black Sea--remains Rome's best documented private individual between Cicero and Augustine. No Roman writer, not even Vergil, ties his identity to the regions of Italy more successfully than Pliny. His individuality can be captured by focusing on the range of locales in which he lived: from his hometown of Comum (Como) at the foot of the Italian Alps, down through the villa and farms he owned in Umbria, to the senate and courtrooms of Rome and the magnificent residence he owned on the coast near the capital. Organized geographically, Man of High Empire is the first full-scale biography devoted solely to the Younger Pliny. Reserved, punctilious, occasionally patronizing, and perhaps inclined to overvalue his achievements, Pliny has seemed to some the ancient equivalent of Mr. Collins, the unctuous vicar of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. Roy Gibson reveals a man more complex than this unfair comparison suggests. An innovating landowner in Umbria and a deeply generous benefactor in Comum, Pliny is also a consul who plays with words in Rome and dispenses summary justice in the provinces. A solicitous, if rather traditional, husband in northern Italy, Pliny is also a literary modernist in Rome, and--more surprisingly--a secret pessimist about Trajan, the 'best' of emperors. Pliny's life is a window on to the Empire at its zenith. The book concludes with an archaeological tour guide of the sites associated with Pliny.

What Graeco Roman Grammar Was About

Learning Latin the Ancient Way: Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Dixon, R. M. W. (2010). Basic Linguistic Theory, Vols 1 and 2. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Fehling, D. (1956–7).

What Graeco Roman Grammar Was About

This book explains how the grammarians of the Graeco-Romance world perceived the nature and structure of the languages they taught. The volume focuses primarily on the early centuries AD, a time when the Roman Empire was at its peak; in this period, a grammarian not only had a secure place in the ancient system of education, but could take for granted an established technical understanding of language. By delineating what that ancient model of grammar was, P. H. Matthews highlights both those aspects that have persisted to this day and seem reassuringly familiar, such as 'parts of speech', as well as those aspects that are wholly dissimilar to our present understanding of grammar and language. The volume is written to be accessible to students of linguistics from undergraduate level upwards, and assumes no knowledge of Latin or Ancient Greek.

A Cultural History of Money in Antiquity

Dickey, Eleanor (2016), Learning Latin the Ancient Way. Latin Textbooks from the Ancient World. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Donderer, Michael (1984), “Münzen als Bauopfer in römischen Privathäusern,” Bonner Jahrbücher 184: ...

A Cultural History of Money in Antiquity

The origins of the modern, Western concept of money can be traced back to the earliest electrum coins that were produced in Asia Minor in the seventh century BCE. While other forms of currency (shells, jewelry, silver ingots) were in widespread use long before this, the introduction of coinage aided and accelerated momentous economic, political, and social developments such as long-distance trade, wealth creation (and the social differentiation that followed from that), and the financing of military and political power. Coinage, though adopted inconsistently across different ancient societies, became a significant marker of identity and became embedded in practices of religion and superstition. And this period also witnessed the emergence of the problems of money - inflation, monetary instability, and the breakup of monetary unions - which have surfaced repeatedly in succeeding centuries. Drawing upon a wealth of visual and textual sources, A Cultural History of Money in Antiquity presents essays that examine key cultural case studies of the period on the themes of technologies, ideas, ritual and religion, the everyday, art and representation, interpretation, and the issues of the age.

Stories of daily life from the Roman world

What did Roman children do first when they arrived at school in the morning? What excuse for missing school could be counted on to stave off a whipping from the teacher? What did a Roman banker do when someone came to borrow money?

Stories of daily life from the Roman world

What did Roman children do first when they arrived at school in the morning? What excuse for missing school could be counted on to stave off a whipping from the teacher? What did a Roman banker do when someone came to borrow money? What did a Roman wife say when her husband came home drunk? The answers to such questions can be found not in mainstream ancient literature (whose writers had their minds on higher things) but in language textbooks for ancient Latin learners. These 'colloquia' offer an ancient introduction to Roman culture, covering such areas as shopping, banking, bathing, dining, arguing, and going to school; recently rediscovered, they are here presented for the first time in a format aimed at readers with no prior knowledge of Latin, Greek, or the ancient world. They come complete with introductory material, extensive illustrations, and a full explanation of their fascinating history.

Mythische Sph renwechsel

Fahrt ins Totenreich, Versetzung auf die Insel der Seligen, Aufstieg in den Himmel - Sphärenwechsel in antiken Mythen thematisieren wichtige Welterklärungs- und Weltbewältigungsversuche.

Mythische Sph  renwechsel

Fahrt ins Totenreich, Versetzung auf die Insel der Seligen, Aufstieg in den Himmel - Sphärenwechsel in antiken Mythen thematisieren wichtige Welterklärungs- und Weltbewältigungsversuche. Um solche und andere Mythen systematisch und komparatistisch fundiert aufzuarbeiten, bedarf es einer umfassenden Rahmentheorie sowie einer kulturspezifisch und kulturvergleichend applizierbaren Methodik. Die DFG-Forschungsgruppe 2064 STRATA begreift Mythen als Stoffe, die in medial unterschiedlicher Gestalt konkretisiert werden können. Eine Rekonstruktion dieser Stoffe gelingt durch die Methode der Hylemanalyse, der Extraktion und Sequenzierung kleinster handlungstragender Bausteine (Hyleme). Um die Komplexität von Mythenvarianten zu erfassen, wird außerdem das Instrument der Stratifkationsanalyse eingesetzt, welches historisch gewachsene Schichten erkennen lässt. Die hier eingeschlagene neue Forschungsrichtung gibt Einblick in die dynamischen Überlieferungsprozesse zentraler Mythen aus antiken Kulturen und überrascht mit dem Nachweis verschiedener Strata in den untersuchten Stoffen, die ein Nebeneinander mehrerer Bedeutungsebenen generieren.

Learn Latin from the Romans

A Complete Introductory Course Using Textbooks from the Roman Empire Eleanor Dickey ... (Incidentally, the ancient Latin teachers made extensive use of such teaching methods, though the other language involved was Greek rather than ...

Learn Latin from the Romans

Learn Latin from the Romans is the only introductory Latin textbook to feature texts written by ancient Romans for Latin learners. These texts, the 'colloquia', consist of dialogues and narratives about daily life similar to those found in modern-language textbooks today, introducing learners to Roman culture as well as to Latin in an engaging, accessible, and enjoyable way. Students and instructors will find everything they need in one complete volume, including clear explanations of grammatical concepts and how Latin works, both British and American orders for all noun and adjective paradigms, 5,000 easy practice sentences, and over 150 longer passages (from the colloquia and a diverse range of other sources including inscriptions, graffiti, and Christian texts as well as Catullus, Cicero, and Virgil). Written by a leading Latin linguist with decades of language teaching experience, this textbook is suitable for introductory Latin courses worldwide.

Communicative Approaches for Ancient Languages

She was beginning to know her combined Latin II and Latin III class, who were expected to work with one of the well-known readingcomprehension method Latin textbooks. But there was a problem. She rang me: 'It's such a tiny class, ...

Communicative Approaches for Ancient Languages

This book is the first in its field. It showcases current and emerging communicative practices in the teaching and learning of ancient languages (Latin and Greek) across contemporary education in the US, the UK, South America and continental Europe. In all these parts of the globe, communicative approaches are increasingly being accepted as showing benefits for learners in school, university and college classrooms, as well as at specialist conferences which allow for total immersion in an ancient language. These approaches are characterised by interaction with others using the ancient language. They may include various means and modalities such as face-to-face conversations and written communication. The ultimate aim is to optimise the facility to read such languages with comprehension and engagement. The examples showcased in this volume provide readers with a vital survey of the most current issues in communicative language teaching, helping them to explore and consider adoption of a wider range of pedagogical practices, and encouraging them to develop tools to promote engagement and retention of a wider variety of students than currently find ancient languages accessible. Both new and experienced teachers and learners can build on the experiences and ideas in this volume to explore the value of these approaches in their own classrooms.