Learning to Cook in 1898

Her course in household chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology was designed to enable women to learn how to cook and manage a household . The classes were structured around her belief that “ science , technology , and ...

Learning to Cook in 1898

Based on the pocket notebook and handwritten recipes of Irma Rosenthal Frankenstein, a young Chicago housewife from the turn of the twentieth century, Learning to Cook in 1898 is a glimpse into American culinary history.

From the Jewish Heartland

Steinberg, Learning to Cook in 1898, 10. 18. Ibid., 55. 19. Ferber, A Peculiar Treasure, 67. 2o. Eliassof, “The Jews of Illinois,” 283. 21. Ehrlich, Zion in the Valley (1997), 82. 22. “Bohemian Israelites in Wisconsin,” The Occident and ...

From the Jewish Heartland

From the Jewish Heartland: Two Centuries of Midwest Foodways reveals the distinctive flavor of Jewish foods in the Midwest and tracks regional culinary changes through time. Exploring Jewish culinary innovation in America's heartland from the 1800s to today, Ellen F. Steinberg and Jack H. Prost examine recipes from numerous midwestern sources, both kosher and nonkosher, including Jewish homemakers' handwritten manuscripts and notebooks, published journals and newspaper columns, and interviews with Jewish cooks, bakers, and delicatessen owners. With the influx of hundreds of thousands of Jews during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries came new recipes and foodways that transformed the culture of the region. Settling into the cities, towns, and farm communities of Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota, Jewish immigrants incorporated local fruits, vegetables, and other comestibles into traditional recipes. Such incomparable gustatory delights include Tzizel bagels and rye breads coated in midwestern cornmeal, baklava studded with locally grown cranberries, dark pumpernickel bread sprinkled with almonds and crunchy Iowa sunflower seeds, tangy ketchup concocted from wild sour grapes, Sephardic borekas (turnovers) made with sweet cherries from Michigan, rich Chicago cheesecakes, native huckleberry pie from St. Paul, and savory gefilte fish from Minnesota northern pike. Steinberg and Prost also consider the effect of improved preservation and transportation on rural and urban Jewish foodways, as reported in contemporary newspapers, magazines, and published accounts. They give special attention to the impact on these foodways of large-scale immigration, relocation, and Americanization processes during the nineteenth century and the efforts of social and culinary reformers to modify traditional Jewish food preparation and ingredients. Including dozens of sample recipes, From the Jewish Heartland: Two Centuries of Midwest Foodways takes readers on a memorable and unique tour of midwestern Jewish cooking and culture.

Barbecue

Ferguson's work for Bohler—how he learned to cook barbecue, when he became the lead man at the pits—but we do ... By 1898, he was living in Augusta proper with his wife, Alice, and the city directory listed his occupation as “gardener.

Barbecue

"A revised and expanded second edition of the definitive history of an iconic American food, barbecue, from its historical origins to the present"--

Food and Drink in American History

lobstER À la nEWbERg oR dElMonico Cook six lobsters each weighing about two pounds in boiling salted water for ... one hotel in New-York to-day whose chef did not learn his cooking at Delmonico's, every one of them” (Rimmer 1898, 124).

Food and Drink in American History

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages covers topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

Lora Webb Nichols

14 , 1898. I am learning to cook puddings . I can cook 4 kinds now . We have had pudding every day for dinner lately & I made them . Practice must have made perfect for Lora's pudding making , as eventually Charley Fait , a young man ...

Lora Webb Nichols


Cook Taste Learn

How the Evolution of Science Transformed the Art of Cooking Guy Crosby ... Therefore, 1 molecular weight of water weighs 18 grams, which chemists decided in 1898 should be called a mole (short for molecular weight).

Cook  Taste  Learn

Cooking food is one of the activities that makes humanity unique. It’s not just about what tastes good: advances in cooking technology have been a constant part of our progress, from the ability to control fire to the emergence of agriculture to modern science’s understanding of what happens at a molecular level when we apply heat to food. Mastering new ways of feeding ourselves has resulted in leaps in longevity and explosions in population—and the potential of cooking science is still largely untapped. In Cook, Taste, Learn, the food scientist and best-selling author Guy Crosby offers a lively tour of the history and science behind the art of cooking, with a focus on achieving a healthy daily diet. He traces the evolution of cooking from its earliest origins, recounting the innovations that have unraveled the mysteries of health and taste. Crosby explains why both home cooks and professional chefs should learn how to apply cooking science, arguing that we can improve the nutritional quality and gastronomic delight of everyday eating. Science-driven changes in the way we cook can help reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases and enhance our quality of life. The book features accessible explanations of complex topics as well as a selection of recipes that illustrate scientific principles. Cook, Taste, Learn reveals the possibilities for transforming cooking from a craft into the perfect blend of art and science.

Catalog

2191 COOKIIG INSTRUCTION Out of a cocoon into the real vorld . 1898 Exploring professional cooking -- a dev approach to food service . 1932 Onlocking prison talent . 1952 ABC's of learning sicrovave cooking ( slidel .

Catalog


Food and Nutrition Information and Educational Materials Center catalog

2191 COOKING INSTRUCTION Out of a cocoon into the real vorld . 1898 Exploring professional cooking -- a nev approach to food service . 1932 Unlocking prison talent . 1952 ABC's of learning sicrovave cooking ( Slide ) .

Food and Nutrition Information and Educational Materials Center catalog


Catalog Supplement Food and Nutrition Information and Educational Materials Center

2191 COOKIIG INSTRUCTION Out of a cocoon into the real vorld . 1898 Exploring professional cooking -- a nev approach to food service . 1932 Unlocking prison talent . 1952 IBC's of learning microvave cooking ( slide ) .

Catalog  Supplement   Food and Nutrition Information and Educational Materials Center


Cook s Crier

A. R. SUTTON , at Hackettstown , NY , to learn the trade of a miller , which he has made the calling of ' his ' life . ... 1898 COOK , George Goshen 1 ; 1898 on separate roll COOK , Edward Goshen Mustered out Nov.

Cook s Crier


Women And Work In Africa

... the girls learn to sew, wash clothes, cook, and keep house" (Verhaegen, 1898, p. 153). Though education for artisans was sponsored by the colonial administration for boys and missionaries designated home economics as the principal ...

Women And Work In Africa

This collection of articles grows out of a symposium on the subject of women and work in Africa held on the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University of Illinois in the spring of 1979. The organizing committee for that program sought first, to update the field of economic studies of women in Africa and second, to provide a forum for the exchange and stimulation of ideas among scholars and professionals concerned for women in Africa. The publication here of the majority of the symposium papers represents a logical final step in the fulfillment of the objectives of the symposium program committee.

Nothing to Write Home About

For working-class women employed in domestic service, cooking could be both unpaid household work and paid labour. ... or retain servants in British Columbia, a number of women from middleclass British backgrounds learned to cook too.

Nothing to Write Home About

Nothing to Write Home About uncovers the significance of British family correspondence sent between the United Kingdom and British Columbia between 1858 and 1914. Drawing on thousands of letters, Laura Ishiguro offers insights into epistolary topics including familial intimacy and conflict, everyday concerns such as boredom and food, and what correspondents chose not to write. She shows that Britons used the post to navigate family separations and understand British Columbia as an uncontested settler home. These letters and their writers played a critical role in laying the foundations of a powerful settler order that continues to structure the province today.

Report of the Chief

Experiments on Losses in Cooking Meat , 1898–1900 , by H. S. Grindley ( Bulletin No. ... With a view of learning something of the dietary of Chinese living in California and its relation to muscular work , studies were made of a ...

Report of the Chief


Annual Reports of the Department of Agriculture

Experiments on Losses in Cooking Meat , 1898-1900 , by H. S. Grindley ( Bulletin No. ... With a view of learning something of the dietary of Chinese living in California and its relation to muscular work , studies were made of a ...

Annual Reports of the Department of Agriculture


Congressional Serial Set

The hospital ship Aid was purchased from the Massachusetts Volunteer Aid Association in November , 1898 ... In view of the difficulty experienced in learning through chief surgeons of corps and departments the sanitary condition and ...

Congressional Serial Set


United States Congressional Serial Set

In 1898 there were 29 white deaths from typhoid fever , and in 1899 , 19. ... Water to drink , water to cook with , water to wash with , and water with which to clean our city , and water for such industrial purposes as are paramount in ...

United States Congressional Serial Set


Report of the Director of the Office of Experiment Stations

Experiments on Losses in Cooking Meat , 1898–1900 , by H. S. Grindley ( Bulletin No. ... With a view of learning something of the dietary of Chinese living in California and its relation to muscular work , studies were made of a ...

Report of the Director of the Office of Experiment Stations


In the Service of Empire

In the bible of Indian housekeeping, The Complete Indian Housekeeper and Cook (1898), the authors claimed that '[t]he ... on the ground that there must be some physical cause for inability to learn or remember'.63 The description of ...

In the Service of Empire

Despite recent research, the 19th-century history of domestic service in empire and its wider implications is underexplored. This book sheds new light on servants and their masters in the British Empire, and in doing so offers new discourses on the colonial home, imperial society identities and colonial culture. Using a wide range of source material, from private papers to newspaper articles, official papers and court records, Dussart explores the strategic nature of the relationship, the connection between imperialism, domesticity and a master/servant paradigm that was deployed in different ways by varied actors often neglected in the historical record. Positioned outside the family but inside the private place of the home, 'the domestic servant' was often the foil against which 19th-century contemporaries worked out class, race and gender identities across metropole and colony, creating those places in the process. The role of domestic servants in empire thus lay not only in the labour they undertook, but also in the way the servant-master relationship constituted ground that helped other power relations to be imagined and contested. Dussart explores the domestic service relationship in 19th-century Britain and India, considering how ideas about servants and their masters and/or mistresses spanned imperial space, and shaped peoples and places within it.

Archaeologists Tourists Interpreters

Hassam begins with some encouraging words for learners: Eastern languages are not difficult to acquire, ... method for Universal Self-Tuition in European and Oriental Languages', a series which was advertised in Cook's Handbooks.

Archaeologists  Tourists  Interpreters

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, growing numbers of tourists and scholars from Europe and America, fascinated by new discoveries, visited the Near East and Egypt – attracted by the riches and mysteries of the Land of the Bible. Almost all such visitors, no matter how esoteric or academic their pursuits, had to deal with the local authorities and the native workforce for their archaeological excavations. The vast majority of these visitors had to rely on interpreters, dragomans, translators and local guides. This study, based on published and unpublished travel memoirs, guidebooks, personal papers and archaeological reports of the British and American archaeologists, deals with the socio-political status and multi-faceted role of interpreters at the time. Those bi- or multi-lingual individuals frequently took on (or were forced to take on) much more than just interpreting. They often played the role of go-betweens, servants, bodyguards, pimps, diplomats, spies, messengers, managers and overseers, and had to mediate, scheme and often improvise, whether in an official or unofficial capacity. For the most part denied due credit and recognition, these interpreters are finally here given a new voice. An engrossing story emerges of how through their many and varied actions and roles, they had a crucial part to play in the introduction to Britain and America of these mysterious past cultures and civilizations.