Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne 1862 1884 Annotated

Laura M. Towne Rupert Sargent Holland. his hand upon his shoulder. ... You do not know what perfect delight your letter gave me, when I got it after I had done hoping for it. Everybody else got their letters two days before and I ...

Letters and Diary of Laura M  Towne  1862 1884  Annotated

On April 9, 1862, 37-year-old Laura Matilda Towne to Port Royal Island, newly captured by the Union forces in the American Civil War. She spent the next 38 years of her life educating and ministering to freed slaves. She maintained the utmost belief in the humanity and possibilities for African-Americans. With her friend, Ellen Murray, she established the Penn Center school on St. Helena Island, the first school for emancipated slaves in the United States. Laura Towne is an vital figure in black history in America. Now a National Historic Landmark, the Penn Center was used during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s to train movement workers in non-violent civil disobedience. Here are Laura Towne's own letters to her beloved family and excerpts from her diary. The documents contain a fascinating look at African-American emancipation, hunger to learn and work, events of the war, and especially a look at the Reconstruction South. This edition is abridged and annotated. For the first time, this long-out-of-print book is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers and smartphones. Be sure to LOOK INSIDE or download a sample.

South Carolina Women

Holland, ed., Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne, 203, 221 (entries dated December 13, 1868, November 27, 1870); Robbins, “Laura Towne,” 50. 31. Robbins, “Laura Towne,” 46. On William Towne, see Holland, ed., Letters and Diary of Laura ...

South Carolina Women

Volume One: This volume, which spans the long period from the sixteenth century through the Civil War era, is remarkable for the religious, racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the women it features. Essays on plantation mistresses, overseers' wives, nonslaveholding women from the upcountry, slave women, and free black women in antebellum Charleston are certain to challenge notions about the slave South and about the significance of women to the state's economy. South Carolina's unusual history of religious tolerance is explored through the experiences of women of various faiths, and accounts of women from Europe, the West Indies, and other colonies reflect the diverse origins of the state's immigrants.

Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne

Written from the Sea Islands of South Carolina, 1862-1884 Laura Matilda Towne Rupert Sargent Holland. - a steps are so rotted that they are hardly safe , and when I do have another set , I believe I will have them made of brick like ...

Letters and Diary of Laura M  Towne


Reforging the White Republic

See Laura M. Towne Diary , July 27 , 1863 , Penn School Papers , Manuscripts Department , The University of North Carolina ... Nellie F. Stearns to " Lizzie , " Nellie F. Stearns Letter , William R. Perkins Library , Duke University .

Reforging the White Republic

During Reconstruction, former abolitionists in the North had a golden opportunity to pursue true racial justice and permanent reform in America. But why, after the sacrifice made by thousands of Civil War patriots to arrive at this juncture, did the moment slip away, leaving many whites throughout the North and South more racist than before? Edward J. Blum takes a fresh look at this question, focusing on the vital role that religion played in reunifying northern, and southern whites into a racially segregated society. He tells the fascinating story of how northern Protestantism, once the catalyst for racial egalitarianism, promoted the image of a "white republic" that conflated whiteness, godliness, and nationalism. Blum explores a wide array of venues and media to document how figures from-Harriet Beecher Stowe to Frederick Douglass either supported or tried to resist the retreat from Reconstruction. Magazines, personal diaries, sermons, hymns, travelogues, Supreme Court opinions, and political caricatures illustrate religious ideologies at play in virtually every aspects of the larger culture. The myth of the white republic helped mend the North-South rift while lending moral purpose to the government's imperialist ambitions, and by 1900 the United States felt divinely sanctioned in subjugating peoples of color at home and abroad. A blend of history and social science, Reforging the White Republic offers a surprising perspective on the forces of religion as well as nationalism and imperialism at a critical point in American history.

Rebellion Reconstruction and Redemption 1861 1893

Laura M. Towne Diary, March 3, 8, 1864; Beaufort Free South, April 2, 1864; Salmon P. Chase Papers, 4: 292–93. 33. ... McGuire, “Hands on the Land,” 82–83; Berlin, Miller, Reidy, and Rowland, Freedom, 299–303; Pearson, Letters from Port ...

Rebellion  Reconstruction  and Redemption  1861   1893

In Rebellion, Reconstruction, and Redemption, 1861-1893, the second of three volumes on the history of Beaufort County, Stephen R. Wise and Lawrence S. Rowland offer details about the district from 1861 to 1893, which influenced the development of the South Carolina and the nation. During a span of thirty years the region was transformed by the crucible of war from a wealthy, slave-based white oligarchy to a county where former slaves dominated a new, radically democratic political economy. This volume begins where volume I concluded, the November 1861 Union capture and occupation of the Sea Islands clustered around Port Royal Sound, and the Confederate retreat and re-entrenchment on Beaufort District's mainland, where they fended off federal attacks for three and a half years and vainly attempted to maintain their pre-war life. In addition to chronicling numerous military actions that revolutionized warfare, Wise and Rowland offer an original, sophisticated study of the famous Port Royal Experiment in which United States military officers, government officials, civilian northerners, African American soldiers, and liberated slaves transformed the Union-occupied corner of the Palmetto State into a laboratory for liberty and a working model of the post-Civil War New South. The revolution wrought by Union victory and the political and social Reconstruction of South Carolina was followed by a counterrevolution called Redemption, the organized campaign of Southern whites, defeated in the war, to regain supremacy over African Americans. While former slave-owning, anti-black "Redeemers" took control of mainland Beaufort County, they were thwarted on the Sea Islands, where African Americans retained power and kept reaction at bay. By 1893, elements of both the New and Old South coexisted uneasily side by side as the old Beaufort District was divided into Beaufort and Hampton counties. The Democratic mainland reverted to an agricultural-based economy while the Republican Sea Islands and the town of Beaufort underwent an economic boom based on the phosphate mining industry and the new commercial port in the lowcountry town of Port Royal.

The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimk

30. Captain J. C. Dutch was commander of the Union blockade vessel Kingfisher . The captain was a man described by Laura Towne as " bold and enterprising . " Holland , Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne , 108-109 . 31.

The Journals of Charlotte Forten Grimk

Diaries of a nineteenth-century scholar, reformer, teacher, and writer

Raising Freedom s Child

Letter from Miss Eveleth, Jacksonville, FL, American Missionary, February 1865, 79. 152. Towne, Letter from St. Helena, March 9, 1866, Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne, 172. 153. Washington Creel, “A Peculiar People,” 287–288. 154.

Raising Freedom s Child

This work examines slave emancipation and opposition to it as a far-reaching, national event with profound social, political, and cultural consequences. The author analyzes multiple views of the African American child to demonstrate how Americans contested and defended slavery and its abolition.

Standing Before Us

Biographical Sketch by AUDREY W. VINCENT ✦ Writings of Laura Matilda Towne " Diary of Laura M. Towne , April 1862 - May , 1864. " Trans . and ed . by Elizabeth Pratt Jenks . Penn Center , St. Helena , SC . Letters and Diary of Laura ...

Standing Before Us

Letters, essays, stories, speeches and poems by women who were social reformers from 1776 to 1936.

Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Letters and Diary of Laura M  Towne

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Children s Civil War

... Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne, 6; Patricia Brady, “Trials and Tribulations: American Missionary Association Teachers and Black Education in Occupied New Orleans, 1863–1864,” Louisiana History 31 (Winter 1990): 11; Towne Diary, ...

The Children s Civil War

Children--white and black, northern and southern--endured a vast and varied range of experiences during the Civil War. Children celebrated victories and mourned defeats, tightened their belts and widened their responsibilities, took part in patriotic displays and suffered shortages and hardships, fled their homes to escape enemy invaders and snatched opportunities to run toward the promise of freedom. Offering a fascinating look at how children were affected by our nation's greatest crisis, James Marten examines their toys and games, their literature and schoolbooks, the letters they exchanged with absent fathers and brothers, and the hardships they endured. He also explores children's politicization, their contributions to their homelands' war efforts, and the lessons they took away from the war. Drawing on the childhoods of such diverse Americans as Jane Addams, Booker T. Washington, and Theodore Roosevelt, and on sources that range from diaries and memoirs to children's "amateur newspapers," Marten examines the myriad ways in which the Civil War shaped the lives of a generation of American children. "An original-minded, skillfully and suggestively presented history, haunting in its detailed unfolding of a war that put so many already vulnerable youngsters in danger, but elicited from some of them, as well, impressively sensitive, responsive thoughts, gestures, and deeds in what became, as this extraordinary book's title insists, their civil war.--Journal of American History "James Marten's thoroughly researched and engagingly written study . . . stands as one of the most exciting studies to emerge in the last dozen years. . . . Marten has taken a topic ignored by both Civil War historians and historians of childhood and crafted an engaging, masterful, nuanced, and readable study that will not quickly leave the reader's mind or heart.--American Studies "The first comprehensive account of Civil War children. . . . Thoroughly researched and nicely illustrated, The Children's Civil War will be a touchstone for historians and generalists who seek to gain a fuller understanding of life on the home front between 1861 and 1865.--Civil War History The Children's Civil War is a poignant and fascinating look at childhood during our nation's greatest crisis. Using sources that include diaries, memoirs, and letters, James Marten examines the wartime experiences of young people--boys and girls, black and white, northern and southern--and traces the ways in which the Civil War shaped the lives of a generation of American children. -->

Gullah Statesman

Holland , Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne , 289-91 ; Campbell , White and Black , 345 ; News and Courier , October 30 , 1878 . 74. Simkins and Woody , S.C. During Reconstruction , 548 ; Taylor , Negro in S.C. , 292 ; W. Rayford ...

Gullah Statesman

A native of Beaufort, South Carolina, Robert Smalls was born into slavery but—through acts of remarkable courage and determination—became the first African American hero of the Civil War and one of the most influential African American politicians in South Carolina history. In this largely political biography of Smalls's inspirational story, Edward A. Miller, Jr., traces the triumphs and setbacks of the celebrated U.S. congressman and advocate of compulsory, desegregated public education to illustrate how the life and contributions of this singular individual were indicative of the rise and fall of political influence for all African Americans during this rough transitional period in American history.

Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Letters and Diary of Laura M  Towne

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Schools for All

Henry M. Sherwood, Quarterly Publication of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio 7 (1912): 15. 7. Swint, Northern Teacher, p. 79. 8. Laura M. Towne, Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne, ed. Rupert S. Holland (Cambridge, ...

Schools for All

Schools for All provides the first in-depth study of black education in Southern public schools and universities during the twelve-year Reconstruction period which followed the Civil War. In the antebellum South, the teaching of African Americans was sporadic and usually in contravention to state laws. During the war, Northern religious and philanthropic organizations initiated efforts to educate slaves. The army, and later the Freedmen's Bureau, became actively involved in freed-men's education. By 1870, however, a shortage of funds for the work forced the bureau to cease its work, at which time the states took over control of the African American schools. In an extensive study of records from the period, William Preston Vaughn traces the development—the successes as well as the failures—of the early attempts of the states to promote education for African Americans and in some instances to establish integration. While public schools in the South were not an innovation of Reconstruction, their revitalization and provision to both races were among the most important achievements of the period, despite the pressure from whites in most areas which forced the establishment of segregated education. Despite the ultimate failure to establish an integrated public school system anywhere in the South, many positive achievements were attained. Although the idealism of the political Reconstructionists fell short of its immediate goals in the realm of public education, precedents were established for integrated schools, and the constitutional revisions achieved through the Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments laid the groundwork for subsequent successful assaults on segregated education.

Tender Violence in US Schools

Alice N. Lincoln, foreword to Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne opens with a foreword that makes it known promptly and indisputably that Laura Towne is a hero whose value can be neither measured nor ...

Tender Violence in US Schools

Within educational research, the over-disciplining of Black and Indigenous students is most often presented as a problem located within pathologized or misunderstood communities. That is, theories and proposed solutions tend toward those that ask how we can make students of color from particular backgrounds more suited to US educational standards rather than questioning the racist roots of those standards. Tender Violence in US Schools takes as a provocation this "discipline gap," in exploring a thus far unconsidered stance and asking how white women (the majority of US teachers) have historically understood their roles in the disciplining of Black and Indigenous students, and how and why their role has been constructed over time and space in service to institutions of the white settler colonial state.

Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original.

Letters and Diary of Laura M Towne

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Mistresses and Slaves

McIver Diary , 2 May 1865 ; Clifton , Life on Argyle Island , 351 , see also 353 ; Coxe , Memories , 48. ... 2 : 280 ; Laura M. Towne , Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne : Written from the Sea Islands of South Carolina , 1862-1884 ...

Mistresses and Slaves

Marli Weiner challenges much of the received wisdom on the domestic realm of the nineteenth-century southern plantation--a world in which white mistresses and female slaves labored together to provide food, clothing, and medicines to the larger plantation community. Although divided by race, black and white women were joined by common female experiences and expectations of behavior. Because work and gender affected them as much as race, mistresses and female slaves interacted with one another very differently from the ways they interacted with men. Supported by the women's own words, Weiner offers fresh interpretations of the ideology of domesticity that influenced women's race relations before the Civil War, the gradual manner in which they changed during the war, and the harsher behaviors that resulted during Reconstruction. A volume in the series Women in American History, edited by Anne Firor Scott, Nancy A. Hewitt, and Stephanie Shaw

Penn Center

The Letters and Diary ofLaura M. Towne, Writtenfrom the Sea Islands ofSouth Carolina, 1862–1884, ed. Rupert Sargent Holland, x (hereafter cited as Towne, Letters and Diary). When a quotation from Laura Towne's diary is not included in ...

Penn Center

Here is all of Penn Center's rich past and present, as told through the experiences of its longtime Gullah inhabitants and visitors to St. Helena Island. It is the inspiring story behind the first school for former slaves, from the Civil War through the civil rights movement, illustrated in forty-two captivating photographs.

Be Free or Die The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

Laura M. Towne, The Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne: Written from the Sea Islands of South Carolina (1862–1884), ed. Rupert Sargent (Cambridge, MA: Riverside, 1912), 167. W. B. McKee to Wade Hampton, n.d., Records of Governor Wade ...

Be Free or Die  The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls  Escape from Slavery to Union Hero

***Finalist for the Gilder Lehrman Lincoln Prize*** Henry Louis Gates, Jr: "A stunning tale of a little-known figure in history." Candice Millard: “Be Free or Die makes you want to stand up and cheer.” The astonishing true story of Robert Smalls’ amazing journey from slave to Union hero and ultimately United States Congressman. It was a mild May morning in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1862, the second year of the Civil War, when a twenty-three-year-old slave named Robert Smalls did the unthinkable and boldly seized a Confederate steamer. With his wife and two young children hidden on board, Smalls and a small crew ran a gauntlet of heavily armed fortifications in Charleston Harbor and delivered the valuable vessel and the massive guns it carried to nearby Union forces. To be unsuccessful was a death sentence for all. Smalls’ courageous and ingenious act freed him and his family from slavery and immediately made him a Union hero while simultaneously challenging much of the country’s view of what African Americans were willing to do to gain their freedom. After his escape, Smalls served in numerous naval campaigns off Charleston as a civilian boat pilot and eventually became the first black captain of an Army ship. In a particularly poignant moment Smalls even bought the home that he and his mother had once served in as house slaves. Cate Lineberry's Be Free or Die is a compelling narrative that illuminates Robert Smalls’ amazing journey from slave to Union hero and ultimately United States Congressman. This captivating tale of a valuable figure in American history gives fascinating insight into the country's first efforts to help newly freed slaves while also illustrating the many struggles and achievements of African Americans during the Civil War.

Southern Women

It must also be said that Towne and the other women "missionaries" are more alert to and sensitive to the stories of the women than are the male diarists and letter writers. 4. Holland, Letters and Diary of Laura M. Towne, pp. 3-4. 5.

Southern Women

First published in 1988. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.