Lexicography and the OED

It also produced, as this book shows, a host of problems: on the nature of Englishness, correctness, and general standards of language use, as well as in aspects of pronunciation, semantics, and syntax.

Lexicography and the OED

Lexicography and the OED: Pioneers in the Untrodden Forest sets out to explore the pioneering endeavours in both lexicography and lexicology which led to the making of the first English dictionary published by Oxford. Deliberately conceived as a new departure in English lexicography, the first OED, as James Murray stressed, was to be founded on an unequivocal return to first principles, both in the nature of its construction and in the evidence amassed for its compilation. It also produced, as this book shows, a host of problems: on the nature of Englishness, correctness, and general standards of language use, as well as in aspects of pronunciation, semantics, and syntax. Often making use of previously unpublished archive material, this collection of twelve essays provides both a range of perspectives from which the dictionary can be approached, and also explores the particular problems posed by the attempt to realize the pioneering acts of lexicography integral to the making of the dictionary.

The Oxford History of English Lexicography

This volume also includes an account of the inception and development of dictionaries developed for particular users, especially foreign learners of English. The Oxford History of English Lexicography unites scholarship with readability.

The Oxford History of English Lexicography

These substantial volumes present the fullest account yet published of the lexicography of English from its origins in medieval glosses, through its rapid development in the eighteenth century, to a fully-established high-tech industry that is as reliant as ever on learning and scholarship. The history covers dictionaries of English and its national varieties, including American English, with numerous references to developments in Europe and elsewhere which have influenced the course of English lexicography. Part one of Volume I explores the early development of glosses and bilingual and multilingual dictionaries and examines their influence on lexicographical methods and ideas. Part two presents a systematic history of monolingual dictionaries of English and includes extensive chapters on Johnson, Webster and his successors in the USA, and the OED. It also contains descriptions of the development of dictionaries of national and regional varieties, and of Old and Middle English, and concludes with an account of the computerization of the OED. The specialized dictionaries described in Volume II include dictionaries of science, dialects, synonyms, etymology, pronunciation, slang and cant, quotations, phraseology, and personal and place names. This volume also includes an account of the inception and development of dictionaries developed for particular users, especially foreign learners of English. The Oxford History of English Lexicography unites scholarship with readability. It provides a unique and accessible reference for scholars and professional lexicographers and offers a series of fascinating encounters with the men and women involved over the centuries in the making of works of profound national and linguistic importance.

The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary

This book tells the history of the Oxford English Dictionary from its beginnings in the middle of the nineteenth century to the present.

The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary

This book tells the history of the Oxford English Dictionary from its beginnings in the middle of the nineteenth century to the present. The author, uniquely among historians of the OED, is also a practising lexicographer with nearly thirty years' experience of working on the Dictionary. He has drawn on a wide range of sources--including previously unexamined archival material and eyewitness testimony--to create a detailed history of the project. The book explores the cultural background from which the idea of a comprehensive historical dictionary of English emerged, the lengthy struggles to bring this concept to fruition, and the development of the book from the appearance of the first printed fascicle in 1884 to the launching of the Dictionary as an online database in 2000 and beyond. It also examines the evolution of the lexicographers' working methods, and provides much information about the people--many of them remarkable individuals--who have contributed to the project over the last century and a half.

The Oxford Handbook of Lexicography

This volume provides concise, authoritative accounts of the approaches and methodologies of modern lexicography and of the aims and qualities of its end products.

The Oxford Handbook of Lexicography

This volume provides concise, authoritative accounts of the approaches and methodologies of modern lexicography and of the aims and qualities of its end products. Leading scholars and professional lexicographers, from all over the world and representing all the main traditions and perspectives, assess the state of the art in every aspect of research and practice. The book is divided into four parts, reflecting the main types of lexicography. Part I looks at synchronic dictionaries - those for the general public, monolingual dictionaries for second-language learners, and bilingual dictionaries. Part II and III are devoted to the distinctive methodologies and concerns of historical dictionaries and specialist dictionaries respectively, while chapters in Part IV examine specific topics such as description and prescription; the representation of pronunciation; and the practicalities of dictionary production. The book ends with a chronology of major events in the history of lexicography. It will be a valuable resource for students, scholars, and practitioners in the field.

Samuel Johnson and the Journey Into Words

This book looks at the range of Johnson's writings on, and the complexity of his thinking about, language and lexicography.

Samuel Johnson and the Journey Into Words

Popular readings of Johnson as a dictionary-maker often see him as a writer who both laments and attempts to control the state of the language. Lynda Mugglestone looks at the range of Johnson's writings on, and the complexity of his thinking about, language and lexicography. She shows how these reveal him probing problems not just of meaning and use but what he considered the related issues of control, obedience, and justice, as well as the difficulties of power when exerted over the 'sea of words'. She examines his attitudes to language change, loan words, spelling, history, and authority, describing, too, the evolution of his ideas about the nature, purpose, and methods of lexicography, and shows how these reflect his own and others' thinking about politics, culture, and society. The book offers a careful reassessment of Johnson's prescriptive practice, examining in detail his commitment to evidence, and the uses to which this might be put. Dictionary-making, for Johnson, came to be seen as a long and difficult voyage round the world of the English language. While such images play their own role in lexicographical tradition, Johnson would, as this volume explores, also make them very much his own in a range of distinctive, and illuminating, ways. Johnson's metaphors invite us to consider-and reconsider-the processes by which a dictionary might be made and the kind of destination it might seek, as well as the state of language that might be reached by such endeavours. For Johnson, where the dictionary-maker might go, and what should be accomplished along the way, can often seem to raise pertinent and perhaps troubling questions. Lynda Mugglestone's generous, wide-ranging account casts new light on Johnson's life in language and provides a convincing reassessment of his impact on English culture, the making of dictionaries, and their role in a nation's identity. She ends by considering the power of Johnson's legacy and the degree to which his work continues to guide our attitudes to language and what we variously expect dictionaries to be and do.

Lexicography and Physicke

This is an authoritativeaccount of a specialized vocabulary which will be of considerable influence on future studies of sixteenth-century English.

Lexicography and Physicke

Medical practitioners of the sixteenth century had their own body of special terms, just like the doctors of this century. The author examines medical terminology used in a selection of thirteen medical works published between 1547 and 1612, and compares it with the treatment of these words in the OED and other dictionaries of today. This study reveals errors, omissions, and biases which raise questions for lexicographical tools in general. This is an authoritativeaccount of a specialized vocabulary which will be of considerable influence on future studies of sixteenth-century English.

English lexicography through the ages A case study based on four dictionary entries

Due to the restricted length available for this paper, the early seventeenth century has been set as starting point for this work; more precisely Robert Cawdrey's Table Alphabeticall (1604), a most well-known work regarded today as the ...

English lexicography through the ages  A case study based on four dictionary entries

Seminar paper from the year 2015 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,7, University of Bonn, course: English Words: Structure, History and Usage, language: English, abstract: The history of the English lexicography offers through its numerous works that have survived up to our days a great opportunity to observe not only the semantic development of words, but also their layout in a page, from their fonts' styles and sizes to the structure of their meanings and the later acquisition symbols and abbreviations. Online availability of historical dictionaries enables us to study comparatively and diachronically the curriculum vitae of words, through which we can reconstruct a morpho-semantic overview that links past with present usages and meanings including their semantic development (e.g. polysemy, shifted meanings etc.), spelling variations, etymological suggestions and other valuable pieces of information. In many cases, due to the scientific achievements and rapid changes that occur in the human societies, it is possible to observe how social and cultural changes may have been captured within a particular definition or an etymological explanation. The current study focuses on the analysis of four dictionary entries. How do the meanings of the selected words evolve semantically and what does each lexicographer offer to the reader as we approach modern times? Due to the restricted length available for this paper, the early seventeenth century has been set as starting point for this work; more precisely Robert Cawdrey's Table Alphabeticall (1604), a most well-known work regarded today as the first monolingual English dictionary. A total of ten important dictionaries up to the digital OED will be used. The aim is to demonstrate through a comparative approach what semantic changes have taken place throughout the definitions, what has survived or become obsolete over time and what is the semantic status of today's definitions within the selected headwords.

Symposium on Lexicography IX

The volume also includes contributions dealing with corpus-based dictionaries, neologisms, valency, collocations, equivalents semantics, grammar, etymology, vocabulary, homonymy, euphemisms, the history of lexicography, and the techniques ...

Symposium on Lexicography IX

The proceedings cover new perspectives in the field of lexicography, including both theoretical and practical topics, and new aspects of special and bilingual dictionaries. The volume also includes contributions dealing with corpus-based dictionaries, neologisms, valency, collocations, equivalents semantics, grammar, etymology, vocabulary, homonymy, euphemisms, the history of lexicography, and the techniques of computerized dictionary production.

Samuel Johnson and the Journey Into Words

This book looks at the range of Johnson's writings on, and the complexity of his thinking about, language and lexicography, not least with reference to the difficulties of power when exerted over the 'sea of words'.

Samuel Johnson and the Journey Into Words

"Popular readings of Johnson as a dictionary-maker often see him as a writer who both laments and attempts to control the state of the language. Lynda Mugglestone looks at the range of Johnson's writings on, and the complexity of his thinking about, language and lexicography. She shows how these reveal him probing problems not just of meaning and use but what he considered the related issues of control, obedience, and justice, as well as the difficulties of power when exerted over the 'sea of words'. She examines his attitudes to language change, loan words, spelling, history, and authority, describing, too, the evolution of his ideas about the nature, purpose, and methods of lexicography, and shows how these reflect his own and others' thinking about politics, culture, and society. The book offers a careful reassessment of Johnson's prescriptive practice, examining in detail his commitment to evidence, and the uses to which this might be put."--Dust cover flap.

Lexicography

This book is an accessible introduction to lexicography – the study of dictionaries.

Lexicography

This book is an accessible introduction to lexicography – the study of dictionaries. Dictionaries are used at home and at school, cited in law courts, sermons and parliament, and referred to by crossword addicts and Scrabble players alike. Lexicography provides a detailed overview of the history, types and content of these essential references. Howard Jackson analyzes a wide range of dictionaries, from those for native speakers to thematic dictionaries and those on CD-ROM, to reveal the ways in which dictionaries fulfil their dual function of describing the vocabulary of English and providing a useful and accessible reference resource. Beginning with an introduction to the terms used in lexicology to describe words and vocabulary, and offering summaries and suggestions for further reading, Lexicography: An Introduction is highly student-friendly. It is ideal for anyone with an interest in the development and use of dictionaries.

Early Modern English Lexicography

This two-volume study presents for the first time a census of printed monolingual glossaries and dictionaries published from 1475-1640, as well as a systematic bibliographical description of these works.

Early Modern English Lexicography

This two-volume study presents for the first time a census of printed monolingual glossaries and dictionaries published from 1475-1640, as well as a systematic bibliographical description of these works. The volumes are designed as a specialized preliminary examination of the growth and development of English lexicography in the Early Modern English period. Sch�fer includes lemmatical material listed alphabetically and documented according to the criteria of the Oxford English Dictionary, additions and corrections never before published, and detailed explanations of how the material was assembled lexigraphically. In addition, more than 5,000 main entries comprise neologisms, antedatings, post-datings, unregistered senses, additional citations and corrections. Sch�fer discusses in detail the question of lexical transmission through sources overlooked in the OED.

The Bloomsbury Companion To Lexicography

The Bloomsbury Companion to Lexicography offers the definitive guide to a key area of linguistic study.

The Bloomsbury Companion To Lexicography

The Bloomsbury Companion to Lexicography offers the definitive guide to a key area of linguistic study. Each companion is a comprehensive reference resource featuring an overview of key topics, research areas, new directions and a manageable guide to beginning or developing research in the field. Lexicography, as the practice of compiling dictionaries, has a long tradition that has been, for much of the time, largely independent of linguistics. The direct influence of linguistics on lexicography goes back around 50 years, though longer in the case of learners' dictionaries. The present volume aims to reflect on the research that has been and is being done in lexicography and to point the way forward. It tackles, among other topics, the critique of dictionaries in the electronic medium, the future of historical lexicography in the electronic mode with special reference to the online Oxford English Dictionary, and e-lexicography in general.

Lexicology Semantics and Lexicography

The papers in this volume show the range and direction of current work in historical semantics and word-studies.

Lexicology  Semantics and Lexicography

The papers in this volume show the range and direction of current work in historical semantics and word-studies. There is a strong focus throughout on semantic change and lexical innovation, interpreted within a sociolinguistic, cultural or textual context. Many of the papers draw on the remarkable range of electronic resources now available to historical linguists, notably corpora, dictionaries, bibliographies and thesauruses, and show the effects that these have had in stimulating new lines of research or the re-interpretation of previous conclusions. Cognitive semantics, and especially prototype theory, emerges as a challenging theoretical framework for much current research. The volume contains a selection from papers presented at the 10th International Conference on English Historical Linguistics (10ICEHL). They include work on historical lexicography and an account of the workshop on electronic dictionary resources, such as the Revised Oxford English Dictionary, which formed the centrepiece of the Fourth G. L. Brook Symposium.

The Lexicography of English

This book looks at English dictionaries in Great Britain and the USA from 1600 to today. It is both a definitive history of the lexicography of English and a complete introduction to the making of dictionaries.

The Lexicography of English

This book looks at English dictionaries in Great Britain and the USA from 1600 to today. It is both a definitive history of the lexicography of English and a complete introduction to the making of dictionaries. Wide-ranging, wittily written, and authoritative it will appeal to everyone interested in dictionaries, English, and language.

Reading the OED

" "I'm reading the OED so you don't have to," says Ammon Shea on his slightly masochistic journey to scale the word lover's Mount Everest: the Oxford English Dictionary.

Reading the OED

An obsessive word lover's account of reading the entire Oxford English Dictionary, hailed as "the Super Size Me of lexicography." "I'm reading the OED so you don't have to," says Ammon Shea on his slightly masochistic journey to scale the word lover's Mount Everest: the Oxford English Dictionary. In 26 chapters filled with sharp wit, sheer delight, and a documentarian's keen eye, Shea shares his year inside the OED, delivering a hair-pulling, eye-crossing account of reading every word.

Lexicography Then and Now

Most of the articles in this volume have been updated. The editors have also conflated six articles on the history of dictionaries into one seamless narrative with connective tissue supplied by Zgusta.

Lexicography Then and Now

Professor Zgusta’s work in lexicography and linguistics proper is built upon a multilingual command of linguistic theory, literary history, the history of linguistics, and his experience as a ›practical‹ lexicographer. The topic under consideration may be the organization and development of a standard variety of a language; explorations of the consequences of linguistic theory on the practical lexicographic applications in making dictionaries that range from Ahtna to Zoque and Batad Ifuagao to Yolngu-Matha; the method of definition in bilingual dictionaries; the state of affairs in Russian lexicography; learner’s dictionaries; ancient Greek lexicography; pragmatics; scripts and morphological types; the history of English lexicography; or behind the scenes at the making of the Czech-Chinese dictionary. The reader will not only be offered a careful and wide-ranging study of these important topics in the discipline, but will be taken on a guided comparative and historical tour that illuminates the strengths and weaknesses of current practice and theory. His work reminds those linguists and lexicographers who are locked into ›paradigm‹ battles of the Kuhnian kind that the wheel has already been invented. Most of the articles in this volume have been updated. The editors have also conflated six articles on the history of dictionaries into one seamless narrative with connective tissue supplied by Zgusta.

Studies in Lexicography

This collection of essays, edited by the distinguished lexicographer Dr. Robert Burchfield, examines and evaluates some of the greatest dictionaries of our age, from Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon to the Oxford English Dictionary ...

Studies in Lexicography

This collection of essays, edited by the distinguished lexicographer Dr. Robert Burchfield, examines and evaluates some of the greatest dictionaries of our age, from Liddell and Scott's Greek-English Lexicon to the Oxford English Dictionary. Written by leading lexicographers from around the world, these essays focus on the large historical, period, and regional dictionaries, providing insights into a broad range of issues, including: the treatment of homonyms, polysemy, and dialects; the effectiveness of dictionaries designed for foreign students; and the way words of Romance origin are dealt with in English dictionaries.

Teaching and Researching Lexicography

Teaching and Researching Lexicography explains the relations between lexicographic practice (dictionary-making) and theory (dictionary research), with special reference to the perspectives of: * dictionary history * dictionary criticism * ...

Teaching and Researching Lexicography

Who compiles dictionaries and other reference works? Which are used by whom? How do they achieve their purpose? Lexicography is a very important subject and the product of lexicography, the Dictionary, is a valuable resource in language learning. Teaching and Researching Lexicography explains the relations between lexicographic practice (dictionary-making) and theory (dictionary research), with special reference to the perspectives of: * dictionary history * dictionary criticism * dictionary typology * dictionary structure * dictionary use The final section of the book contains a variety of useful resources, including relevant related websites, a glossary of terms and a bibliography of cited dictionaries. This section can also be found on the Teaching and Researching Lexicography companion web-site. Written in a highly accessible style, Teaching and Researching Lexicography provides the most comprehensive, up-to-date and international coverage of this field in English, and will be of great interest to lexicographers, language teachers and applied linguists.

Small Dictionaries and Curiosity

This book tells the story of the first European wordlists of minority and unofficial languages and dialects, from the end of the Middle Ages to the early nineteenth century.

Small Dictionaries and Curiosity

Small Dictionaries and Curiosity tells a story which has not been told before, that of the first European wordlists of minority and unofficial languages and dialects, from the end of the Middle Ages to the early nineteenth century. These wordlists were collected by people who were curious about the unrecorded or little-known languages they heard around them. Between them, they document more than 40 language varieties, from a Basque-Icelandic pidgin of the North Atlantic to the Kalmyk language of the lower Volga. The book gives an account of about 90 of these dictionaries and wordlists, some of them single-page jottings and some of them full-sized printed books, paying attention to their content and their physical form alike. It explores the kinds of curiosity and imagination by which their makers were moved: the lover of all languages hearing new voices in an inn; the speaker of a dying language recording his linguistic memories; the patriot deploying his lexicographical findings in the service of an emerging nation. It offers an encounter with the diverse voices of the entirety of post-medieval Europe, turning away from the people of the courts and universities whose language was documented in big dictionaries to listen to people who did not speak the languages of power: the people of remote places and dying communities; the illiterate poor, settled or homeless; migrants from the edges of Europe and beyond.

Fifty Key Thinkers on Language and Linguistics

'General Explanations', Preface to the first fascicle of the Oxford English Dictionary, 1884 (reprinted in The Compact Edition of the Oxford English Dictionary, Clarendon, ... Lexicography and the OED, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Fifty Key Thinkers on Language and Linguistics

What was the first language, and where did it come from? Do all languages have properties in common? What is the relationship of language to thought? Fifty Key Thinkers on Language and Linguistics explores how fifty of the most influential figures in the field have asked and have responded to classic questions about language. Each entry includes a discussion of the person’s life, work and ideas as well as the historical context and an analysis of his or her lasting contributions. Thinkers include: Aristotle Samuel Johnson Friedrich Max Müller Ferdinand de Saussure Joseph H. Greenberg Noam Chomsky Fully cross-referenced and with useful guides to further reading, this is an ideal introduction to the thinkers who have had a significant impact on the subject of Language and Linguistics.