Lexicon Urthus Second Edition

The first edition was nominated for a World Fantasy Award. This second edition, available for the first time in paperback, includes 300 new entries.

Lexicon Urthus  Second Edition

Lexicon Urthus is an alphabetical dictionary for the complete Urth Cycle by Gene Wolfe: The Shadow of the Torturer; The Claw of the Conciliator; The Sword of the Lictor; The Citadel of the Autarch; the sequel Urth of the New Sun; the novella Empires of Foliage and Flower; the short stories "The Cat," "The Map," and "The Old Woman Whose Rolling Pin Is the Sun"; and Gene Wolfe's own commentaries in The Castle of the Otter. The first edition was nominated for a World Fantasy Award. This second edition, available for the first time in paperback, includes 300 new entries. When the first edition was published, Science Fiction Age said: "Lexicon Urthus makes a perfect gift for any fan of [Wolfe's] work, and from the way his words sell, it appears that there are many deserving readers out there waiting." Gary K. Wolfe, in Locus, said: "A convenient and well researched glossary of names and terms. . . . It provides enough of a gloss on the novels that it almost evokes Wolfe's distant future all by itself. . . . It can provide both a useful reference and a good deal of fun." Donald Keller said, in the New York Review of Science Fiction: "A fruitful product of obsession, this is a thorough . . . dictionary of the Urth Cycle. . . . Andre-Driussi's research has been exhaustive, and he has discovered many fascinating things . . . [it is] head-spinning to confront a myriad of small and large details, some merely interesting, others jawdropping."

Lexicon Urthus

The first edition was nominated for a World Fantasy Award. This second edition includes over 1,200 entries.

Lexicon Urthus

Lexicon Urthus is an alphabetical dictionary for the complete Urth Cycle by Gene Wolfe: The Shadow of the Torturer; The Claw of the Conciliator; The Sword of the Lictor; The Citadel of the Autarch; the sequel Urth of the New Sun; the novella Empires of Foliage and Flower; the short stories "The Cat," "The Map," and "The Old Woman Whose Rolling Pin Is the Sun"; and Gene Wolfe's own commentaries in The Castle of the Otter. The first edition was nominated for a World Fantasy Award. This second edition includes over 1,200 entries. When the first edition was published, Science Fiction Age said: "Lexicon Urthus makes a perfect gift for any fan of [Wolfe's] work, and from the way his words sell, it appears that there are many deserving readers out there waiting." Gary K. Wolfe, in Locus, said: "A convenient and well researched glossary of names and terms. . . . It provides enough of a gloss on the novels that it almost evokes Wolfe's distant future all by itself. . . . It can provide both a useful reference and a good deal of fun." Donald Keller said, in the New York Review of Science Fiction: "A fruitful product of obsession, this is a thorough . . . dictionary of the Urth Cycle. . . . Andre-Driussi's research has been exhaustive, and he has discovered many fascinating things . . . [it is] head-spinning to confront a myriad of small and large details, some merely interesting, others jawdropping."

Gate of Horn Book of Silk

At the time I was in the middle ofa series of chapbooks (1995–98) correcting and expanding Lexicon Urthus, ... on demand books matured enough that I was tempted into revising and expanding Lexicon Urthus into its second edition (2008).

Gate of Horn  Book of Silk

In this companion guide, Michael Andre-Driussi illuminates Gene Wolfe's Book of the Long Sun and Book of the Short Sun science fiction series through dictionary-style entries on the characters, gods, locations, themes, and timelines of the novels. Gate of Horn, Book of Silk, is organized in two parts, with the first half covering the Long Sun series (Nightside the Long Sun, Lake of the Long Sun, Calde of the Long Sun, and Exodus from the Long Sun) and the second half covering the Short Sun series (On Blue's Waters, In Green's Jungles, and Return to the Whorl). "Languages of the Whorl," a section between the two parts, covers all the dialect, slang, and foreign terms used in the books--thieves' cant, flier language, Tick's talk, and more. Ten maps and diagrams are included. This is Michael Andre-Driussi's third guidebook to the rich tapestries of Gene Wolfe's worlds. As fans of of Lexicon Urthus and The Wizard Knight Companion have noted, that each book is both a convenient tool for a question while re-reading the novels but also an enjoyable read in its own right, from A to Z.

Gene Wolfe 14 Articles on His Fiction

So in many ways, the essay was intended to be an overture for the Lexicon, showing a bit of the work ahead of time. Now it serves to celebrate the publication of Lexicon Urthus, Second Edition (2008).

Gene Wolfe  14 Articles on His Fiction

Ten essays and four reviews, originally published from 1993 to 2014, in "The New York Review of Science Fiction," "Foundation," "Extrapolation," "Ultan's Library," "The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction," "The Internet Review of Science Fiction," "Quantum," and a chapbook on "The Fifth Head of Cerberus." Some of them are available for free online, but many are hard to find. Topics include: *Six pieces on "The Book of the New Sun." *An investigation on the possible star system in "The Fifth Head of Cerberus." *Two overviews of Wolfe's work, one focusing on his short stories, the other on his novels. *A look at the Japanese translation of "The Book of the New Sun."

The Wizard Knight Companion

THE WIZARD KNIGHT COMPANION is a brief alphabetical dictionary for Gene Wolfe's two-volume THE WIZARD KNIGHT series.

The Wizard Knight Companion

THE WIZARD KNIGHT COMPANION is a brief alphabetical dictionary for Gene Wolfe's two-volume THE WIZARD KNIGHT series. Its entries identify the characters in the novel, dive into the mysteries in the text, and explore the Norse, Celtic, and Arthurian sources for names and words in the novels. It includes a map of the region, a cosmology, and a synopsis of the narrative. Nominated for a World Fantasy Award, THE WIZARD KNIGHT has received high accolades from critics and fans. Many reviews highlight its rich use of European mythology; many also comment on its puzzles and mysteries. In a starred review, Booklist calls the series "a complex, even convoluted tale, with so many characters and subplots that a proper summary would far exceed the limits of a Booklist review. . . . There is hardly a piece of northern European heroic literature from which Wolfe doesn't borrow with his usual scholarly flair and in his exquisitely turned prose. . . . Arising from the same sources as Lord of the Rings, THE WIZARD KNIGHT is one of the few fantasies that can justly be compared with it." Kirkus Reviews mentions that "Wolfe likes to spin spiderwebs of plot and counterplot inside his impressively constructed universe." In The Washington Post, Bill Sheehan calls THE WIZARD "a satisfying, wide-ranging novel that contains enough marvels and mysteries (not all of which are resolved or explained) to populate an entire series." Marvels and mysteries, subplots and spiderwebs? If you love THE WIZARD KNIGHT and wish to enjoy it even more, THE WIZARD KNIGHT COMPANION is your perfect guidebook.

Gene Wolfe s The Book of the New Sun

GENE WOLFE REFERENCE Andre-Driussi, Michael. Lexicon Urthus. Second Edition. Albany, California: Sirius Fiction, 2008. [I, ch. 7, ch. 14; IV, ch. 7] ———. Gene Wolfe: 14 Articles on His Fiction. Albany, California: Sirius Fiction, 2016.

Gene Wolfe s The Book of the New Sun

A guide to Gene Wolfe's series The Book of the New Sun, and the sequel The Urth of the New Sun, as well as four shorter "New Sun" works. Designed for use by first-time readers as well as those returning to the text.

The Year s Best Science Fiction Twenty Sixth Annual Collection

from another part of the world is given by The Black Mirror and Other Stories: An Anthology of Science Fiction from ... almost no SF-and-fantasy-oriented reference books this year, with the closest approach probably being Lexicon Urthus ...

The Year s Best Science Fiction  Twenty Sixth Annual Collection

The thirty stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our beings, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Paolo Bacigalupi, Stephen Baxter, Elizabeth Bear, Aliete de Bodard, James L. Cambias, Greg Egan, Charles Coleman Finlay, James Alan Gardner, Dominic Green, Daryl Gregory, Gwyneth Jones, Ted Kosmatka, Mary Robinette Kowal, Nancy Kress, Jay Lake, Paul McAuley, Ian McDonald, Maureen McHugh, Sarah Monette, Garth Nix, Hannu Rajaniemi, Robert Reed, Alastair Reynolds, Mary Rosenblum, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, Geoff Ryman, Karl Schroeder, Gord Sellar, and Michael Swanwick. Supplementing the stories are the editor's insightful summation of the year's events and a lengthy list of honorable mentions, making this book both a valuable resource and the single best place in the universe to find stories that stir the imagination, and the heart.

The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 22

There were almost no SF-and-fantasy-oriented reference books this year, with the closest approach probably being Lexicon Urthus: A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle, Second Edition (Sirius Fiction), by Michael Andre-Driussi.

The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 22

Widely acclaimed as the benchmark annual anthology for science fiction fans, The Mammoth Book of Best New SF is now in its 22nd successful year. Best SF 22 comprises over two dozen fantastic new pieces from the world's best writers of science fiction. This collection encompasses every aspect of the genre: soft, hard, cyberpunk, cyber noir, anthropological, military, and adventure. As ever, a bonus extra is an insightful review of the year's best books and an extensive list of recommended reading. Gardner Dozois is the world's leading SF anthologist, and has won the Hugo Award for Best Editor fifteen times.

Shadows of the New Sun

He is best known for Lexicon Urthus (1994), a guide to Gene Wolfe's New Sun series. ... He is currently working on a second edition of the Lexicon which will correct many of the errors as well as adding new ones.

Shadows of the New Sun

Gene Wolfe is one of the most important American writers to emerge in the latter half of the twentieth century. The fact that he publishes in the field of fantastic literature (which includes horror, science and speculative fiction) has meant that his significance has been largely unacknowledged beyond and, at times, even within the genre. Nevertheless, he remains the author of some of the most stylistically distinct, structurally complex, and intellectually invigorating imaginative fiction of recent years. This collection of interviews and essays places under one cover an amazing selection of difficult-to-find resources for the avid Gene Wolfe reader and scholar. Essays concern the nature of writing, including character, structure and the profession of the writer. Also included are a series of interviews with Wolfe and the holy grail of 'New Sun' aficionados: Books in the Book of the New Sun, previously only available in a rare small-press volume. This collection will inspire fans and scholars alike to commit themselves to debating new interpretations of Wolfe's fiction.

The Generation Starship in Science Fiction

Driussi, Michael Andre. Lexicon Urthus: A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle. 2nd ed. Albany, CA: Sirius Fiction, 2008. Edwards, Malcolm J. “Gernsback, Hugo.” Clute and Nicholls 490–491. _____, and John Clute. “Palmer, Raymond A(rthur).

The Generation Starship in Science Fiction

This critical history explores the concept of the multi-generational interstellar space voyage in science fiction between 1934, the year of its appearance, into the 21st century. It defines and analyzes what became known as the “generation starship” idea and examines the science and technology behind it, also charting the ways in which generation starships manifest themselves in various SF scenarios. It then traces the history of the generation starship as a reflection of the political, historical, and cultural context of science fiction’s development.

The Year s Best Science Fiction

from another part of the world is given by The Black Mirror and Other Stones An Anthology of Science Fiction from Germany and ... with the closest approach probably being Lexicon Urthus : A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle , Second Edition ...

The Year s Best Science Fiction


The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy

Lexicon Urthus. Albany, CA: Sirius Fiction, 1994. ... "Yes, and civilization is sterilization," Bernard went on, concluding on a tone of irony the second hypnopaedic lesson in elementary hygiene. — Aldous Huxley Brave New World (1932) ...

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Science Fiction and Fantasy

A comprehensive three-volume reference work offers six hundred entries, with the first two volumes covering themes and the third volume exploring two hundred classic works in literature, television, and film.

Up Through an Empty House of Stars

... 1998 Gene Wolfe and Lexicon Urthus 207 George Hay Remembered 210 Iain M. Banks - Inversions 214 David Brin - the Second Uplift Trilogy 215 Elizabeth Hand - Glimmering 218 Diana Wynne Jones - Deep Secret 221 Ken MacLeod - The Cassini ...

Up Through an Empty House of Stars

At last, _Up Through an Empty House of Stars_ brings together the best of the never before collected SF reviews and articles that helped build David Langford's towering reputation since 1980. Complementing the review columns collected in _The Complete Critical Assembly_ and the knockabout essays and squibs in _The Silence of the Langford_, this volume's 100 glittering selections mix serious critical insight with the inimitable Langford wit. In 2002 David Langford won his sixteenth Hugo award as Best Fan Writer, for critical and humorous commentary on SF. In the same year his occasionally scandalous SF newsletter _Ansible_ won its fifth Hugo. Langford also received the 2001 Hugo for best short story, and the 2002 Skylark Award. Here he shines a unique light on classics like Ernest Bramah, G.K. Chesterton, Robert Heinlein and Jack Vance, and analyses major SF -- and major clunkers, and minor eccentrics -- of the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s, continuing to the latest by such current stars as Gene Wolfe and China Mi, ville. Plus witty asides on crime fiction and its SF links, gleeful examination of writing so bad it's almost good, and (even at his most serious) turns of phrase to make you laugh aloud

Attending Daedalus

Second and third readings are indicated.33 Like Searles , Greenland recognises how the mysterious and revelatory ... 35 A notable exception is Michael Andre - Driussi , whose Lexicon Urthus : A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle ( 1994 ) ...

Attending Daedalus

This new study of the fiction of Gene Wolfe, one of the most influential contemporary American science fiction writers, offers a major reinterpretation of Gene Wolfe’s four-volume The Book of the New Sun and its sequel The Urth of the New Sun. After exposing the concealed story at the heart of Wolfe’s magnum opus, Wright adopts a variety of approaches to establish that Wolfe is the designer of an intricate textual labyrinth intended to extend his thematic preoccupations with subjectivity, the unreliability of memory, the manipulation of individuals by social and political systems, and the psychological potency of myth, faith and symbolism into the reading experience.

Solar Labyrinth

Saint Agia, as AndreDriussi notesin Lexicon Urthus, wasthe mother of Saint Loup. ... And, of course, Loup means wolf—another prime example of author Wolfe intromitting himself cameostyle, if subtextually.3 Agia itself also means saint ...

Solar Labyrinth

Gene Wolfe's BOOK OF THE NEW SUN has been hailed by both critics and readers as quite possibly the best science fiction novel ever written. And yet at the same time, like another masterpiece of fiction, James Joyce's Ulysses, it's been deemed endlessly complex and filled with impenetrable mysteries. Now, however, in the first book-length investigation of Wolfe's literary puzzlebox, Robert Borski takes you inside the twisting corridors of the tetralogy and along the way reveals his solutions to many of the novel's conundrums and riddles, such as who really is Severian's lost twin sister (almost certainly not who you think) and why he believes the novel's main character may not even be the torturer Severian. Furthermore, and in essay after essay, Borski demonstrates how a single master key will unlock many of the book's secret relationships-all in the attempt to guide you through the labyrinth that is Gene Wolfe's BOOK OF THE NEW SUN.

Windows of the Imagination

We discover in Lexicon Urthus that most of the characters are named after medieval or late-classical saints: ... Outside the Church, "Severian" refers either to a member of an Encratite or Gnostic sect of the 2nd century... or to a ...

Windows of the Imagination

"These 29 essays on fantasy, skepticism, writing, and related topics--spanning nearly two decades--are filled with the insightful observations of a literary master. Schweitzer is one of the best critics in the field."--John Gregory Betancourt. (Criticism)

The New York Review of Science Fiction

... far from home , but ensure the birth of another universe . Who's the greater Messiah ? Works Cited Andre - Driussi , Michael . Lexicon Urthus , A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle . San Francisco : Sirius Fiction , 1994 . Wolfe , Gene .

The New York Review of Science Fiction


Science fiction Studies

Partly , of course , this might have to do with this being Snake's - Hands's second incarnation . ... Michael Andre - Driussi has performed an invaluable service in such projects as his Lexicon Urthus : A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle ...

Science fiction Studies


Science Fiction and Fantasy Reference Index 1992 1995

WITCH HUNT (MOTION PICTURE) Shay, Estelle, "Video Beat: Casting Another Spell," Cinefex No. 60: 123-124. ... Lexicon Urthus: A Dictionary for the Urth Cycle. ... R. "A Second View of Castlevlew," Quondam et Futurus 3(3): 66-76.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Reference Index  1992 1995

This ambitious work provides single-point, unified access to some of the most significant books, articles, and news reports in the science fiction, fantasy, and horror genres. Entries are arranged in two sections-author (subarranged by title) and subject-and may have up to 50 subject terms assigned. No other reference tool addresses the secondary literature of this fast-growing and dynamic field with such in-depth subject coverage as this work, nor approaches its breadth of coverage. Aimed at academic libraries, large public libraries, some school and medium-sized public libraries, and individual scholars, this index supplements Science Fiction and Fantasy Reference Index: 1985-1991 (Libraries Unlimited, 1993) and Science Fiction and Fantasy Reference Index: 1878-1984 (Gale Research, 1987).