Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque

Illuminating difference as much as complementarity, departure as much as continuity, the book captures a dynamic universe of meanings in the various midst of its own re-creations.

Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque

Over the course of some two centuries following the conquests and consolidations of Spanish rule in the Americas during the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries—the period designated as the Baroque—new cultural forms sprang from the cross-fertilization of Spanish, Amerindian, and African traditions. This dynamism of motion, relocation, and mutation changed things not only in Spanish America, but also in Spain, creating a transatlantic Hispanic world with new understandings of personhood, place, foodstuffs, music, animals, ownership, money and objects of value, beauty, human nature, divinity and the sacred, cultural proclivities—a whole lexikon of things in motion, variation, and relation to one another. Featuring the most creative thinking by the foremost scholars across a number of disciplines, the Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque is a uniquely wide-ranging and sustained exploration of the profound cultural transfers and transformations that define the transatlantic Spanish world in the Baroque era. Pairs of authors—one treating the peninsular Spanish kingdoms, the other those of the Americas—provocatively investigate over forty key concepts, ranging from material objects to metaphysical notions. Illuminating difference as much as complementarity, departure as much as continuity, the book captures a dynamic universe of meanings in the various midst of its own re-creations. The Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque joins leading work in a number of intersecting fields and will fire new research—it is the indispensible starting point for all serious scholars of the early modern Spanish world.

Religion in Sixteenth Century Mexico

In Lexikon of Hispanic Baroque, edited by Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills, pp. 225-228. University of Texas Press, Austin. Eire, Carlos 1995 From Madrid to Purgatory: The Art and Craft of Dying in Sixteenth-Century Spain.

Religion in Sixteenth Century Mexico

Detailed comparison of Aztec and Spanish religious devotion, examining the melding of practices during the first century of contact 1519-1600.

Baroque Aesthetics in Contemporary American Horror

Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2014. Cid, Jorge. “Vasos comunicantes del Neobarroco: sobre las escenas y los sentidos compartidos entre las obras de Néstor ...

Baroque Aesthetics in Contemporary American Horror


The Ibero American Baroque

A number of publications resulted from these meetings, the most notable and complementary of which is the multi-author and multi-disciplinary Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation, edited by Evonne ...

The Ibero American Baroque

The Ibero-American Baroque is an interdisciplinary, empirically-grounded contribution to the understanding of cultural exchanges in the early modern Iberian world.

Baroque Seville

Introduction to a special edition of the Bulletin of the Comediantes 65, no. 1 (2013): 1–13. . “Self-Fashioning.” In Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque, edited by Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills, 301–3. Austin: University of Texas Press, ...

Baroque Seville

Baroque art flourished in seventeenth-century Seville during a tumultuous period of economic decline, social conflict, and natural disasters. This volume explores the patronage that fueled this frenzy of religious artistic and architectural activity and the lasting effects it had on the city and its citizens. Amanda Wunder investigates the great public projects of sacred artwork that were originally conceived as medios divinos—divine solutions to the problems that plagued Seville. These commissions included new polychromed wooden sculptures and richly embroidered clothing for venerable old images, gilded altarpieces and monumental paintings for church interiors, elaborate ephemeral decorations and festival books by which to remember them, and the gut renovation or rebuilding of major churches that had stood for hundreds of years. Meant to revive the city spiritually, these works also had a profound real-world impact. Participation in the production of sacred artworks elevated the social standing of the artists who made them and the devout benefactors who commissioned them, and encouraged laypeople to rally around pious causes. Using a diverse range of textual and visual sources, Wunder provides a compelling look at the complex visual world of seventeenth-century Seville and the artistic collaborations that involved all levels of society in the attempt at its revitalization. Vibrantly detailed and thoroughly researched, Baroque Seville is a fascinating account of Seville’s hard-won transformation into one of the foremost centers of Baroque art in Spain during a period of crisis.

The Early Modern Hispanic World

17 Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills, eds., Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque (Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2014); Allan Greer and Jodi Bilinkoff, eds., Colonial Saints: Discovering the Holy in ...

The Early Modern Hispanic World

Iberia stands at the center of key trends in Atlantic and world histories, largely because Portugal and Spain were the first European kingdoms to 'go global'. The Early Modern Hispanic World engages with new ways of thinking about the early modern Hispanic past, as a field of study that has grown exponentially in recent years. It focuses predominantly on questions of how people understood the rapidly changing world in which they lived - how they defined, visualized, and constructed communities from family and city to kingdom and empire. To do so, it incorporates voices from across the Hispanic World and across disciplines. The volume considers the dynamic relationships between circulation and fixedness, space and place, and how new methodologies are reshaping global history, and Spain's place in it.

The Routledge Hispanic Studies Companion to Colonial Latin America and the Caribbean 1492 1898

Baroque Times in Old Mexico: Seventeenth-Century Persons, Places, and Practices. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Levy, Evonne, and Kenneth Mills, eds. 2013. Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and ...

The Routledge Hispanic Studies Companion to Colonial Latin America and the Caribbean  1492 1898

The Routledge Hispanic Studies Companion to Colonial Latin America and the Caribbean (1492-1898) brings together an international team of scholars to explore new interdisciplinary and comparative approaches for the study of colonialism. Using four overarching themes, the volume examines a wide array of critical issues, key texts, and figures that demonstrate the significance of Colonial Latin America and the Caribbean across national and regional traditions and historical periods. This invaluable resource will be of interest to students and scholars of Spanish and Latin American studies examining colonial Caribbean and Latin America at the intersection of cultural and historical studies; transatlantic, postcolonial and decolonial studies; and critical approaches to archives and materiality. This timely volume assesses the impact and legacy of colonialism and coloniality.

Early Modern Things

... especially William Egginton, “Of Baroque Holes and Baroque Folds,” in Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills, eds., Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation (Austin, TX: University of Texas Press, 2013), ...

Early Modern Things

Early Modern Things supplies fresh and provocative insights into how objects – ordinary and extraordinary, secular and sacred, natural and man-made – came to define some of the key developments of the early modern world. Now in its second edition, this book taps a rich vein of recent scholarship to explore a variety of approaches to the material culture of the early modern world (c. 1500–1800). Divided into seven parts, the book explores the ambiguity of things, representing things, making things, encountering things, empires of things, consuming things, and the power of things. This edition includes a new preface and three new essays on ‘encountering things’ to enrich the volume. These look at cabinets of curiosities, American pearls, and the material culture of West Central Africa. Spanning across the early modern world from Ming dynasty China and Tokugawa Japan to Siberia and Georgian England, from the Kingdom of the Kongo and the Ottoman Empire to the Caribbean and the Spanish Americas, the authors provide a generous set of examples in how to study the circulation, use, consumption, and, most fundamentally, the nature of things themselves. Drawing on a broad range of disciplinary perspectives and lavishly illustrated, this updated edition of Early Modern Things is essential reading for all those interested in the early modern world and the history of material culture.

The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque

Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2013. Maravall, José Antonio. Culture of the Baroque: Analysis of a Historical Structure.

The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque

Few periods in history are so fundamentally contradictory as the Baroque, the culture flourishing from the mid-sixteenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries in Europe. When we hear the term âBaroque,â the first images that come to mind are symmetrically designed gardens in French chateaux, scenic fountains in Italian squares, and the vibrant rhythms of a harpsichord. Behind this commitment to rule, harmony, and rigid structure, however, the Baroque also embodies a deep fascination with wonder, excess, irrationality, and rebellion against order. The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque delves into this contradiction to provide a sweeping survey of the Baroque not only as a style but also as a historical, cultural, and intellectual concept. With its thirty-eight chapters edited by leading expert John D. Lyons, the Handbook explores different manifestations of Baroque culture, from theatricality in architecture and urbanism to opera and dance, from the role of water to innovations in fashion, from mechanistic philosophy and literature to the tension between religion and science. These discussions present the Baroque as a broad cultural phenomenon that arose in response to the enormous changes emerging from the sixteenth century: the division between Catholics and Protestants, the formation of nation-states and the growth of absolutist monarchies, the colonization of lands outside Europe and the mutual impact of European and non-European cultures. Technological developments such as the telescope and the microscope and even greater access to high-quality mirrors altered mankindâs view of the universe and of human identity itself. By exploring the Baroque in relation to these larger social upheavals, this Handbook reveals a fresh and surprisingly modern image of the Baroque as a powerful response to an epoch of crisis.

Empires of Knowledge

9 See Susan Dackerman, ed., Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Art Museums, 2011), 19–35. 10 In Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation, ...

Empires of Knowledge

Empires of Knowledge charts the emergence of different kinds of scientific networks – local and long-distance, informal and institutional, religious and secular – as one of the important phenomena of the early modern world. It seeks to answer questions about what role these networks played in making knowledge, how information traveled, how it was transformed by travel, and who the brokers of this world were. Bringing together an international group of historians of science and medicine, this book looks at the changing relationship between knowledge and community in the early modern period through case studies connecting Europe, Asia, the Ottoman Empire, and the Americas. It explores a landscape of understanding (and misunderstanding) nature through examinations of well-known intelligencers such as overseas missions, trading companies, and empires while incorporating more recent scholarship on the many less prominent go-betweens, such as translators and local experts, which made these networks of knowledge vibrant and truly global institutions. Empires of Knowledge is the perfect introduction to the global history of early modern science and medicine.

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

In Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque : Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation , edited by Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills , 73-76 . Austin , TX : University of Texas Press . Mills , Kenneth ( 2003 ) . “ Diego de Ocaña's Hagiography of ...

The Oxford Handbook of Christian Monasticism

The Handbook takes as its subject the complex phenomenon of Christian monasticism. It addresses, for the first time in one volume, the multiple strands of Christian monastic practice. Forty-four essays consider historical and thematic aspects of the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Protestant, and Anglican traditions, as well as contemporary 'new monasticism'. The essays in the book span a period of nearly two thousand years—from late ancient times, through the medieval and early modern eras, on to the present day. Taken together, they offer, not a narrative survey, but rather a map of the vast terrain. The intention of the Handbook is to provide a balance of some essential historical coverage with a representative sample of current thinking on monasticism. It presents the work of both academic and monastic authors, and the essays are best understood as a series of loosely-linked episodes, forming a long chain of enquiry, and allowing for various points of view. The authors are a diverse and international group, who bring a wide range of critical perspectives to bear on pertinent themes and issues. They indicate developing trends in their areas of specialisation. The individual contributions, and the volume as a whole, set out an agenda for the future direction of monastic studies. In today's world, where there is increasing interest in all world monasticisms, where scholars are adopting more capacious, global approaches to their investigations, and where monks and nuns are casting a fresh eye on their ancient traditions, this publication is especially timely.

A Companion to the Spanish Renaissance

acy.41 Ivonne Levy and Kenneth Mills neverthelesss retain the term in their Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: ... in something like Jeremy Robbins' “Renaissance andBaroque:ContinuityandTransformationinEarlyModernSpain,”included in The ...

A Companion to the Spanish Renaissance

A renewed case for the inclusion of Spain within broader European Renaissance movements. This interdisciplinary volume offers a snapshot of the best new work being done in this area.

Minding Animals in the Old and New Worlds

Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation. Ed. Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills. Austin: U of Texas P, 2013. 17–19. Print. – “Animal (Spanish America).” Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic ...

Minding Animals in the Old and New Worlds

Minding Animals in the Old and New Worlds employs current research in cognitive science and the philosophy of animal cognition to explore how humans have understood non-human animals in the Iberian world, from the Middle Ages through the early modern period. Using texts from European and Indigenously-informed sources, Steven Wagschal argues that people tend to conceptualize the minds of animals in ways that reflect their own uses for the animal, the manner in which they interact with the animal, and the place in which the animal lives. Often this has little if anything to do with the actual cognitive abilities of the animal. However, occasionally early authors made surprisingly accurate assumptions about the thoughts and feelings of animals. Wagschal explores a number of ways in which culture and human cognition interact, including: the utility of anthropomorphism; the symbolic use of animals in medieval Christian texts; attempts at understanding the minds of animals in Spain's early modern farming and hunting books; the effect of novelty on animal conceptualizations in "New World" histories, and how Cervantes navigated the forms of anthropomorphism that preceded him to create the first embodied animal minds in fiction.

Corruption in the Iberian Empires

Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, “Self-Fashioning: Spanish America,” in Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation, ed. Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2013), 304–6; ...

Corruption in the Iberian Empires

This book provides new perspectives into a subject that historians have largely overlooked. The contributors use fresh archival research from Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, and the Philippines to examine the lives of slaves and farmworkers as well as self-serving magistrates, bishops, and traders in contraband. The authors show that corruption was a powerful discourse in the Atlantic world. Investigative judges could dismiss culprits, jail them, or, sometimes, have them “garroted and their corpses publicly displayed.”

Baroque and the Political Language of Formalism 1845 1945 Burckhardt W lfflin Gurlitt Brinckmann Sedlmayr

A central argument of the book is that basic terms of architectural history drew from a long established language of political thought.

Baroque and the Political Language of Formalism  1845   1945   Burckhardt  W  lfflin  Gurlitt  Brinckmann  Sedlmayr

This study in intellectual history places the art historical concept of the Baroque amidst world events, political thought, and the political views of art historians themselves. Exploring the political biographies and writings on the Baroque (primarily its architecture) of five prominent Germanophone figures, Levy gives a face to art history, showing its concepts arising in the world. From Jacob Burckhardt's still debated "Jesuit style" to Hans Sedlmayr's Reichsstil, the Baroque concepts of these German, Swiss and Austrian art historians, all politically conservative, and two of whom joined the Nazi party, were all took shape in reaction to immediate social and political circumstances. A central argument of the book is that basic terms of architectural history drew from a long established language of political thought. This vocabulary, applied in the formalisms of Wölfflin and Gurlitt, has endured as art history's unacknowledged political substrate for generations. Classic works, like Wölfflin's Kunstgeschichtliche Grundbegriffe are interpreted anew here, supported by new documents from the papers of each figure.

The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons

This is especially important for a visual culture like that of the Baroque. The distinction between social strata was ... 46 Amanda Wunder, “Dress (Spain),” in Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque. Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation, ...

The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons

In The Atlantic World and the Manila Galleons, José L. Gasch-Tomás offers an account of the trade of Asian goods between colonial Spanish America and East Asia, and the distribution and consumption of those goods in the Spanish Empire, during the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

The Cambridge History of Religions in Latin America

Baroque New Worlds: Representation, Transculturation, Counterconquest. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010. Levy, Evonne, and Mills, Kenneth, eds. Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation.

The Cambridge History of Religions in Latin America

The Cambridge History of Religions in Latin America covers religious history in Latin America from pre-Conquest times until the present. This timely publication is important, firstly, because of the historical and contemporary centrality of religion in the life of Latin America, a region which has been growing in global importance; secondly, for the rapid process of religious change which the region is undergoing; and thirdly, for the region's religious distinctiveness in global comparative terms, which contributes to its importance for debates over religion, globalization, and modernity, not least because Latin America now has more Catholics and more Pentecostals than any other region of the world. Unlike most works on religion in the region, and in recognition of recent strides in scholarship, this volume addresses the breadth of Latin American religion, including religions of the African diaspora, indigenous spiritual expressions, new religious movements, alternative spiritualities, and secularizing tendencies.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Christianity

36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. Celorio, “From the Baroque to the Neobaroque,” in Baroque New Worlds, 501. ... Jaime Lara, “Church: Interior” Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation, eds.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Christianity

By 2025, Latin America's population of observant Christians will be the largest in the world. Nonetheless, studies examining the exponential growth of global Christianity tend to overlook this region, focusing instead on Africa and Asia. Research on Christianity in Latin America provides a core point of departure for understanding the growth and development of Christianity in the "Global South." In The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Christianity an interdisciplinary contingent of scholars examines Latin American Christianity in all of its manifestations from the colonial to the contemporary period. The essays here provide an accessible background to understanding Christianity in Latin America. Spanning the era from indigenous and African-descendant people's conversion to and transformation of Catholicism during the colonial period through the advent of Liberation Theology in the 1960s and conversion to Pentecostalism and Charismatic Catholicism, The Oxford Handbook of Latin American Christianity is the most complete introduction to the history and trajectory of this important area of modern Christianity.

Material Bernini

Amongst her edited works are Bernini's Biographies: Critical Essays (with Maarten Delbeke and Steven F. Ostrow), a special issue of the Sculpture Journal on Bernini's portraits, and Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic ...

Material Bernini

Bringing together established and emerging specialists in seventeenth-century Italian sculpture, Material Bernini is the first sustained examination of the conspicuous materiality of Bernini’s work in sculpture, architecture, and paint. The various essays demonstrate that material Bernini has always been tied (whether theologically, geologically, politically, or in terms of art theory) to his immaterial twin. Here immaterial Bernini and the historiography that sustains him is finally confronted by material Bernini. Central to the volume are Bernini’s works in clay, a fragmentary record of a large body of preparatory works by a sculptor who denied any direct relation between sketches of any kind and final works. Read together, the essays call into question why those works in which Bernini’s bodily relation to the material of his art is most evident, his clay studies, have been configured as a point of unmediated access to the artist’s mind, to his immaterial ideas. This insight reveals a set of values and assumptions that have profoundly shaped Bernini studies from their inception, and opens up new and compelling avenues of inquiry within a field that has long remained remarkably self-enclosed.

Transoceanic Animals as Spectacle in Early Modern Spain

Toronto: University of Toronto Press. 157–76. Norton, Marcy. 2013. “Animal (Spain).” Lexikon of the Hispanic Baroque: Transatlantic Exchange and Transformation. Eds. Evonne Levy and Kenneth Mills. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Transoceanic Animals as Spectacle in Early Modern Spain

Animal spectacles are vital to a holistic appreciation of Spanish culture. In Transoceanic Animals as Spectacle in Early Modern Spain, Beusterien christens five previously unnamed animals, each of whom was a protagonist in a spectacle: Abada, the rhinoceros; Hawa'i, the elephant; Fuleco, the armadillo; Jarama, the bull; and Maghreb, the lion. In presenting and analyzing their stories, Beusterien enriches our understanding of the role of animals in the development of commercial theater in Spain and the modern bullfight. He also contributes to growing scholarly conversations on the importance of Spain in the history of science by examining how animal spectacles had profound repercussions on the emergence of the modern zoo and natural history museum. Combining scholarly content analysis and pedagogical sagacity, the book has a broad appeal for scholars of the early modern Spanish empire, animal studies scholars, and secondary and post-secondary instructors looking for engaging exercises and information for their Spanish language, culture, and history students.