Labor and Laborers of the Loom

In large part the population of weavers mobilized by the outwork system resided in the rural areas of the state; ... Women and children supplemented family income without leaving home, and young adults aided the family without moving to ...

Labor and Laborers of the Loom

Labor and Laborers of the Loom: Mechanization and Handloom Weavers 1780-1840 develops several themes important to understanding the social, cultural and economic implications of industrialization. The examination of these issues within a population of extra-factory workers distinguishes this study. The volume centers on the rapid growth of handloom weaving in response to the introduction of water powered spinning. This change is viewed from the perspectives of mechanics, technological limitations, characteristics of weaving, skills, income and cost. In the works of Duncan Bythell and Norman Murray the displacement of British and Scottish hand weavers loomed large and the silence of American handloom weavers in similar circumstances was deafening. This study reflects the differences between the three culture by centering not on displacement but on survival. Persistence is closely tied to the gradual nature of technological change. The contrasts between independent commercial artisans and outwork weavers are striking. Displacement occurs but only among artisans devoting their time to independent workshop weaving. Alternatively outwork weavers adapted to changing markets and survived. The design and development of spinning and weaving device is stressed, as are the roles of economic conditions, management organization, size of firms, political implications and social factors contribute to the impact of technological change on outwork and craft weavers.

Women and Children of the Mills

Goode , George W. Kathie , the Overseer's Daughter ; or , Love and Life at the Loom . New York and Lowell : Factory Publishing ... She works as a weaver in the Massachusetts mills , where her deceased " father ” was once an overseer .

Women and Children of the Mills

An annotated bibliography of literature, which focuses on issues about women and children and includes 450 texts published from 1787 to 1900 by and about American textile factory workers.

Shyam Benegal

The protagonist Ramalu (Om Puri) is a poor but much respected weaver who lives with his wife, Gouramma (Shabana Azmi), and daughter Chinna (Pallavi Joshi). He also supports his no-good brother and sister-in-law.

Shyam Benegal

Shyam Benegal is the best known and most prolific contemporary film-maker from India's arthouse or 'New Cinema' tradition. This work traces a career with its beginnings in political cinema and a realist aesthetic. Sangeeta Datta demonstrates how the struggles of women and the dispossessed and marginalised in Indian society have found an eloquent expression in films as diverse as Nishant, Bhumika, Mandi, Suraj Ka Satwan Ghoda and Kalyug. The book also traces Benegal's work with his protégés and collaborators including many of the biggest names in Indian Cinema - Shabana Azmi, Smita Patil, Naseeruddin Shah, Karishma Kapoor and A.R. Rahman.

Reports from Commissioners

Evidence to any amount might have been taken , that the daughters of weavers were unacquainted with cooking , and ... in life is to obtain a weaver , and he is disposed to consider the earnings which she can make at the loom as far more ...

Reports from Commissioners


Life Without Rights

“But where else do I find such hard wood for a new loom?” Saragadatta asked. ... “Fine”, said the weaver, “but first I have to consult my wife, my mother and my daughter” Saragadatta said.—“Then go, said the spirit of the forest, ...

Life Without Rights

The topic of the book is the focus on rights, which has spread like wildfire above all in the western part of the world since the Second World War and the impact this way of thinking has had on how we see our fellow human beings. The author sees rights focused thinking and neighborly love as opposites and does not think that the two are compatible. They are mutually exclusive. In other words a different way of thinking is called for, and this applies to all the things that we human beings feel we are entitled to and claim, starting with The Declaration of Human Rights and continuing to the right to a roof over one’s head; throughout the chapters of the book the author argues that we human beings do not have any rights at all, and how we instead have to take a closer look at the parts of rights focused thinking that might be justified. What is the interface of human rights and compassion? The various topics are introduced to the reader by a fairytale or a story, which is meant to make the reader reflect on the problem before meeting the author’s point of view the same way Jesus made his followers think about a problem by means of parables. What is a human right? How can we tell whether a proposed human right is really one? How do we establish the content of particular human rights and how do we prevent such rights from harming human relations? These are questions that the author tries to answer.

Education Literacy and Society 1830 70

... depression and unemployment a common fact of life . The reports on the conditions of the hand - loom weavers in the 1830s and 1840s were full of evidence of real poverty and its effect on schooling . The older children's wages were ...

Education  Literacy and Society  1830 70


Women Family and Society in Medieval Europe

29 And no woman pastry baker without a husband who was also a baker could take an apprentice 30. ... the town government forbade weavers to employ their wives , daughters or maids at the loom.34 This is one of the few texts that states ...

Women  Family and Society in Medieval Europe

A selection of Herlihy's essays compiled as a tribute to his influence. His particular interest in the nature of the family and the role of women within that unit is amply reflected in this volume. Articles include: Did women have a renaissance?; The Florentine Merchant family in the Middle Ages; Biology and History: Suggestions for a Dialogue.

The Damask Days

Margaret Knox had been born in a weaver's cottage, and was the daughter and sister of weavers. All her life Christian had loved the sound of the looms, and whenever she could she spent hours watching the weavers at work.

The Damask Days

Christian Knox is a girl who dreams - of a life beyond that of a Paisley housewife, of a world of learning beyond her Ladies' School, of possiblities her father dismisses as 'daft ideas'. But Christian is determined and when her father refuses to finance her education further she resolves to pay for it herself, by working as a tambourer, embroidering freelance for local textile manufacturers. Soon she's managing a group of Tambouring women on behalf of Paisley's biggest weavers, among them Angus Fraser, a man old enough to be her father but wise enough to appreciate her talents. Plunged into the fascinating world of Scotland's fledgling textile industry, Christian soon finds her combination of Lowland resolve and female flair begins to make its mark. And, in the shape of her greatest, most fought-for inspiration, the Paisley Shawl, it is a mark to be remembered for generations to come. . .

The London Weaver s Company 1600 1970

born in 17 86, had been in the silk industry all his life. As a loombroker he let out looms to other weavers, charging from 3%d. to 4d. a week. The value of each loom was about £1, and, said he, 'I should do very well, as I have about ...

The London Weaver s Company 1600   1970

The Worshipful Company of Weavers, the oldest of all the London Livery Companies, can trace its origins to a twelfth-century craft guild. Largely based upon original records never before studied in depth, this authorized history of the company covers the period from the end of the reign of Elizabeth I to modern times. Alfred Plummer presents a portrait of the London Hand-loom weavers in their historical setting, living strenuous lives in an industry which was once essential but has now disappeared. He describes many fascinating aspects of the Company's 'eventful history', from the numbers of apprentices, to their parents and places of origin, the attitude towards the admission of women and the enlistment by the Weaver's Company of the powerful pen of Daniel Defoe. In addition, the work examines the impact of such catastrophes as the Great Plague and the Fire of London. The author deals with the dogged struggle for survival of the famous Spitalfields silk weavers, and explores the part played by the Weavers and their associated London Livery companies in the 'plantation of Ulster' under James I nearly four centuries ago. This book was first published in 1972.

The World of the Banaras Weaver

in fact, a way of life for them. The rhythms of their everyday life are determined by the act of the production of the Banarasi sari. The production of the Banarasi sari is done in the household, with men, women and children ...

The World of the Banaras Weaver

This book is a fascinating investigation into how communalism plays out in everyday India. Using the metaphor of tana-bana – the warp and the weft of the Banarasi sari – the author reproduces the interwoven life of Hindu-Muslim relations in the Banarasi sari industry. As the city of Banaras in Uttar Pradesh takes the centre stage as the site of this ethnographic study, the author documents the dissonance in representations of Banaras as a sacred Hindu city and its essential plural character. The volume • examines in-depth the lives of Banaras Muslims in the social and economic matrix of the sari industry; • highlights how women negotiate between home, family and their place in the artisanal industry; and • sheds light on their fast-changing world of the Banaras weavers and their responses to it. With a new introduction and fresh data, the second edition looks at the subsequent developments in the weaving industry over the last decade. This volume will be of immense interest to scholars and researchers of social anthropology, gender studies, development studies, sociology and South Asian studies.

Reports from Commissioners

The house in which she lives , and the adjoining one belong to her . by the She rents some acres of land , for which she pays £ 12 per annum ... The daughter is a weaver , but since receiving the patients she works little at the loom .

Reports from Commissioners


Monthly Consular and Trade Reports

Frederick II promised the weavers relief , but their condition was not improved until after the treaty of Versailles . ... 2 , but he has a wife and six children to support , who have no occupation beside that offered by his loom .

Monthly Consular and Trade Reports


Gender Nation and State in Modern Japan

Her words symbolise her own position as a wife and daughter-in-law. The prevailing discourse relating to weaving elucidates ... So it was said that among those who continued weaving every day, there were few with a bad home life. (ibid.) ...

Gender  Nation and State in Modern Japan

Gender, Nation and State in Modern Japan makes a unique contribution to the international literature on the formation of modern nation–states in its focus on the gendering of the modern Japanese nation-state from the late nineteenth century to the present. References to gender relations are deeply embedded in the historical concepts of nation and nationalism, and in the related symbols, metaphors and arguments. Moreover, the development of the binary opposition between masculinity and femininity and the development of the modern nation-state are processes which occurred simultaneously. They were the product of a shift from a stratified, hereditary class society to a functionally-differentiated social body. This volume includes the work of an international group of scholars from Japan, the United States, Australia and Germany, which in many cases appears in English for the first time. It provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the formation of the modern Japanese nation–state, including comparative perspectives from research on the formation of the modern nation–state in Europe, thus bringing research on Japan into a transnational dialogue. This volume will be of interest in the fields of modern Japanese history, gender studies, political science and comparative studies of nationalism.

Consular Reports

Frederick II promised the weavers relief , but their condition was not improved until after the treaty of Versailles . ... His eldest daughter , who has for some time assisted him by spooling , will soon be able to work the loom , and ...

Consular Reports


United States Congressional Serial Set

Frederick II promised the weavers relief , but their condition was not improved until after the treaty of Versailles . ... His eldest daughter , who has for some time assisted him by spooling , will soon be able to work the loom , and ...

United States Congressional Serial Set


Reports from the Consuls of the United States

Frederick II promised the weavers relief , but their condition was not improved until after the treaty of Versailles . ... His eldest daughter , who has for some time assisted him by spooling , will soon be able to work the loom , and ...

Reports from the Consuls of the United States


Commercial Relations of the United States

Frederick II promised the weavers relief , but their condition was not improved until after the treaty of Versailles . ... His eldest daughter , who has for sonie time assisted him by spooling , will soon be able to work the loom , and ...

Commercial Relations of the United States


Weavers of the Southern Highlands

We find several children who have gone to school on money which they themselves have earned from the weaving or ... In the next we find that a daughter has gone to college, partly on money which her mother earned by work at the loom.

Weavers of the Southern Highlands

Weaving centers led the Appalachian Craft Revival at the beginning of the twentieth century. Soon after settlement workers came to the mountains to start schools, they expanded their focus by promoting weaving as a way for women to help their family's financial situation. Women wove thousands of guest towels, baby blankets, and place mats that found a ready market in the women's network of religious denominations, arts organizations, and civic clubs. In Weavers of the Southern Highlands, Philis Alvic details how the Fireside Industries of Berea College in Kentucky began with women weaving to supply their children's school expenses and later developed student labor programs, where hundreds of students covered their tuition by weaving. Arrowcraft, associated with Pi Beta Phi School at Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and the Penland Weavers and Potters, begun at the Appalachian School at Penland, North Carolina, followed the Berea model. Women wove at home with patterns and materials supplied by the center, returning their finished products to the coordinating organization to be marketed. Dozens of similar weaving centers dotted mountain ridges.

Daughters of the Faith SET 2 four books

She looked at the lint-shrouded room that held the loom. Would she be shut up in weavers' rooms for the rest of her life? She could barely catch her breath just thinking about it. A wave of dizziness swept over her and she had to hold ...

Daughters of the Faith SET  2  four books

This package includes four books of the Daughters of Faith Series Set 2: Freedom's Pen, Courage to Run, The Hallelujah Lass, and Ransom's Mark. There are a few elements of the Daughters of Faith Series that separate it from many other children's book biographies. First, these books are about little girls. They are not biographies of the entire life of these characters- these are stories about girls who made a difference while they were still young. This enables the young girl readers to relate to the characters more than they would if these characters had to wait until they were thirty or forty before doing anything significant. Second, these stories are faith journeys. Lawton gets inside the minds of these girls in order to portray their struggles to make God an active part of their lives. In Freedom's Pen, Phillis Wheatley was a little girl of seven or eight years old when she was captured in Gambia and brought to America as a slave in 1761. But she didn’t let her circumstances keep her down. She learned to read and write in English and Latin, and showed a natural gift for poetry. By the time she was twelve, her elegy at the death of the great pastor George Whitefield brought her worldwide acclaim. Phillis became known to heads of state, including George Washington himself, speaking out for American independence and the end of slavery. She became the first African American to publish a book, and her writings would eventually win her freedom. More importantly, her poetry still proclaims Christ almost 250 years later. In Courage to Run, Harriet Tubman was born a slave on a Maryland plantation in the 1800's. She trusts in God, but her faith is tested at every turn. Should she obey her masters or listen to her conscience? This story from Harriet's childhood is a record of courage. Even more, it's the story of God's faithfulness as He prepares her for her adult calling to lead more than 300 people out of slavery through the Underground Railroad. In The Hallelujah Lass, Lawton tells the story of Eliza Shirley, a 16-year-old girl who traveled from England to pioneer the work of the Salvation Army in the United States. As a teenager growing up in nineteenth-century England, Eliza was the picture of a proper young lady. But she longed for more than an ordinary, middle-class life. When a group of Hallelujah Lassies marches into Coventry with a ragtag bunch of followers, singing and banging tabourines, even ensuing riots cannot keep Eliza away. She knows, at last, that this is the work God has prepared for her. And she is ready, no matter what the cost. In Ransom's Mark, when 13-year-old Olive Oatman's wagon train is raided by outlaw Yavapai Indians, she and her sister are captured. After enduring harsh treatment, they are ransomed by a band of Mohaves. Olive struggles to adjust to her new life, but finds comfort in her faith and in an unexpected friendship. When the time comes for her to return to the white world, she is afraid she will never fit in. But she learns to see the Mohave design tattooed on her chin as a sign of God's love and deliverence, a mark of ransom.