The Puzzle of Prison Order

Why does prison social order around the world look so remarkably different? In The Puzzle of Prison Order, David Skarbek develops a theory of why prisons and prison life vary so much.

The Puzzle of Prison Order

Many people think prisons are all the same-rows of cells filled with violent men who officials rule with an iron fist. Yet, life behind bars varies in incredible ways. In some facilities, prison officials govern with care and attention to prisoners' needs. In others, officials have remarkably little influence on the everyday life of prisoners, sometimes not even providing necessities like food and clean water. Why does prison social order around the world look so remarkably different? In The Puzzle of Prison Order, David Skarbek develops a theory of why prisons and prison life vary so much. He finds that how they're governed-sometimes by the state, and sometimes by the prisoners-matters the most. He investigates life in a wide array of prisons-in Brazil, Bolivia, Norway, a prisoner of war camp, England and Wales, women's prisons in California, and a gay and transgender housing unit in the Los Angeles County Jail-to understand the hierarchy of life on the inside. Drawing on economics and a vast empirical literature on legal systems, Skarbek offers a framework to not only understand why life on the inside varies in such fascinating and novel ways, but also how social order evolves and takes root behind bars.

My Life in Prison

The account of Donald Lowrie's 10 years in San Quentin after being convicted of burglary.

My Life in Prison

The account of Donald Lowrie's 10 years in San Quentin after being convicted of burglary.

The Prisoner Society

Through this analysis, this meticulously researched book aims to revive and update the dormant tradition of prison ethnography.

The Prisoner Society

While the use of imprisonment continues to rise in developed nations, we have little sociological knowledge of the prison's inner world. Based on extensive fieldwork in a medium-security prison in the UK, HMP Wellingborough, The Prisoner Society: Power, Adaptation and Social Life in an English Prison provides an in-depth analysis of the prison's social anatomy. It explains how power is exercised by the institution, individualizing the prisoner community and demanding particular forms of compliance and engagement. Drawing on prisoners' life stories, it shows how different prisoners experience and respond to the new range of penal practices and frustrations. It then explains how the prisoner society - its norms, hierarchy and social relationships - is shaped both by these conditions of confinement and by the different backgrounds, values and identities that prisoners bring into the prison environment.

Deen ul Sujanaa The Prisoners Guide to Proper Islamic Life Nineteen Steps to True Probation and Parole

This is the unyielding and never-ending story of the trials and tribulations of life on Earth for the Muslim. Until death comes, you will do this quite ... Do righteous deeds! Give! Upon release from prison you need to change your old.

Deen ul Sujanaa   The Prisoners    Guide to Proper Islamic Life  Nineteen Steps to True Probation and Parole

You’ve broken the law, been sentenced, and now find yourself in jail. You could be in for a hard life. But all is not lost. In Deen-ul-Sujanaa’, author Shaykh Ali Jai Al-Zakar, a prison chaplain, offers a straightforward Islamic guidebook to help you move away from your past life of wrongdoing and instead submit yourself to Allah and change your life for good. Especially focusing on people struggling with incarceration and addictive behaviors, Ali Jai relies on the wisdom of the Qur’an to promote individual recovery and to help free you from your own self-made prisons through nineteen steps. Deen-ul-Sujanaa’ gives a crash course for any detainee, inmate, or prisoner who is seeking solace and resolve, peace, and comfort while awaiting trial, or while serving time. It communicates that the steps to true freedom are not dependent upon probation or parole for the serving of time, but they are realized in complete submission and unification with God.

Secrets from a Prison Cell

This book--handwritten by Tony and later transcribed by outside friends--indirectly challenges the reader to engage prison reform as one of the most important social issues of this generation, wondering if society can shift its emphasis ...

Secrets from a Prison Cell

Tony Vick is serving two life sentences for murder. After nearly twenty years in prison, Tony has literally taken to the pen to document firsthand what life is like behind bars. This book--handwritten by Tony and later transcribed by outside friends--indirectly challenges the reader to engage prison reform as one of the most important social issues of this generation, wondering if society can shift its emphasis from retribution to rehabilitation. Tony's new book describes the violent, even horrific, incidents that occur in prison, incidents mostly hidden in the shadows, away from public awareness. It tells you the stories that those invested in incarceration would rather remain secret. As captivating as it is timely, Secrets from a Prison Cell shortens the distance between those outside and inside prison walls. Through personal stories, essays, and poetry, Tony Vick's book pulls back the curtain on a world invisible to most people, dramatically revealing the realities of life in prison and the power of love to fight dehumanization. For Tony, writing this book has never been about money but about the message. Any proceeds from sales of the book will be donated to the No Exceptions Prison Collective, a non-profit organization that advocates for prison reform. (https://noexceptions.net) No Exception's mission is furthered by its very name, referencing the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution that abolishes slavery, except for those incarcerated in our nation's prisons. Slavery still exists in America!

Prisoners of Our Thoughts

Viktor Frankl's Principles for Discovering Meaning in Life and Work Alex Pattakos ... that world peace would be greatly helped by having more and more people happy with their lives, as Prisoners of Our Thoughts could help them be.

Prisoners of Our Thoughts

NEW EDITION, REVISED AND UPDATED World-renowned psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning is one of the most important books of modern times. Frankl’s personal story of finding a reason to live in Nazi concentration camps has inspired millions. In Prisoners of Our Thoughts, Dr. Alex Pattakos—whom Frankl urged to write this book—elaborates seven “core principles” based on Frankl’s philosophy and demonstrates how they can help us find meaning in our everyday lives and work . This second edition features new stories and examples of people who have applied the principles in the book or who exemplify them; new practical exercises and applications; and a new chapter, “The Meaning Difference®,” which summarizes research demonstrating the critical role of meaning in improving the quality of people’s lives, increasing happiness, promoting health and wellness, and achieving their highest potential.

The Art of War

He furnished them with the court paperwork that exposed "44" convictions of rape. Where Mobsters, Serial Killers and Gangs are all fighting to survive, this is, "The Art of War".

The Art of War

Sex Offenders, who molest and rape children, inflict damage upon them for life. Many victims become drug addicts and criminals who were never defended. In the Art of War: A Prison Memoir, best selling author Glenn Langohr takes you inside a California prison where a guard worked with the inmates to have a notorious "Child Molester" stabbed. He furnished them with the court paperwork that exposed "44" convictions of rape. Where Mobsters, Serial Killers and Gangs are all fighting to survive, this is, "The Art of War."

Prisoners of Russia

Prisoners of Russia


Releasing Prisoners Redeeming Communities

tained by the program and convinced of the “deeper truths” mined by Oz. A sampling of viewer comments36 regarding the show reveals that much of its appeal derives, in fact, from the assumption that it depicts prison life ...

Releasing Prisoners  Redeeming Communities

In the middle of the first decade of the twenty-first century,African Americans made up approximately twelve percent ofthe United States population but close to forty percent of the United States prison population. Now, in the latter half of the decade, the nation is in the midst of the largest multi-year discharge of prisoners in its history. In Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities, Anthony C. Thompson discusses what is likely to happen to these ex-offenders and why. For Thompson, any discussion of ex-offender reentry is, de facto, a question of race. After laying out the statistics, he identifies the ways in which media and politics have contributed to the problem, especially through stereotyping and racial bias. Well aware of the potential consequences if this country fails to act, Thompson offers concrete, realizable ideas of how our policies could, and should, change.

Remote Control

As a consequence, television's place in the modern prison has also come to represent an unanticipated resource in the package of care for prisoners. This book uncovers the complex and rich emotive responses to prison life.

Remote Control

In-cell television is now a permanent feature of prisons in England and Wales, and a key part of the experience of modern incarceration. This sociological exploration of prisoners' use of television offers an engaging and thought provoking insight into the domestic and everyday lives of people in prison - with television close at hand. Victoria Knight explores how television contributes to imprisonment by normalising the prison cell. In doing so it legitimates this space to hold prisoners for long periods of time, typically without structured activity. As a consequence, television's place in the modern prison has also come to represent an unanticipated resource in the package of care for prisoners. This book uncovers the complex and rich emotive responses to prison life. Dimensions of boredom, anger, frustration, pleasure and happiness appear through the rich narratives of both prisoners and staff, indicating the ways institutions and individuals deal with their emotions. It also offers an insight into the unfolding future of the digital world in prisons and begins to consider how the prisoner can benefit from engagement with digital technologies. It will be of great interest to practitioners and scholars of prisons and penology, as well as those interested in the impact of television on society.

Prisoners in State and Federal Prisons and Reformatories

IUM AND MAXIMIUS : LENGTH C7 SENTENCE Total Male Female Minimum 5 years1,821 1,796 25 Minimum 15 to 19 years ---- 214 209 5 5 01 4 8 Maximum 15 to 19 years20 to 29 years ---- 30 to 93 years ------ 99 years Life ---- 10 80 80 1 43 10 75 ...

Prisoners in State and Federal Prisons and Reformatories


Revelations of Prison Life

Revelations of Prison Life


Prison Life in Dixie

"How do we get down and up under the trials and disappointments of life? Who can tell?" So asked John Vaughter at the end of what seemed like endless internment at Andersonville Prison during the American Civil War.

Prison Life in Dixie

"How do we get down and up under the trials and disappointments of life? Who can tell?" So asked John Vaughter at the end of what seemed like endless internment at Andersonville Prison during the American Civil War. While Sherman's army lay in front of Atlanta, he determined to send his cavalry on a raid to the enemy's rear, to destroy their railroad communication. So, on July 27th, 1864, General Stoneman moved eastward to pass around the flank of the rebel army, and General Ed McCook, at the same time, started to pass around the left. McCook’s command numbered about 2,000 men, well mounted and equipped, of which the writer was one. They were captured on July 30 and sent to Andersonville. Vaughter provides a vivid and horrifying look at life in the Confederate's worst prison. After the war was over, the commandant of the prison was tried and hanged. Every memoir of the American Civil War provides us with another view of the catastrophe that changed the country forever. For the first time, this long out-of-print volume is available as an affordable, well-formatted book for e-readers, tablets, and smartphones. Be sure to LOOK INSIDE by clicking the cover above or download a sample.

Frightened for My Life

Frightened for My Life


Against All Hope

Now, with a new introduction by the author, which tells of his life since prison and brings the story of Cuban dissidence up to the case of Elian Gonzalez, Against All Hope is more relevant than ever.

Against All Hope

Against All Hope is Armando Valladares' account of over twenty years in Fidel Castro's tropical gulag. Arrested in 1960 for being philosophically and religiously opposed to communism, Valladares was not released until 1982, by which time he had become one of the world's most celebrated ''prisoners of conscience.'' Interned all those years at the infamous Isla de Pinos prison (from whose windows he watched the failure of the Bay of Pigs invasion), Valladares suffered endless days of violence, putrid food and squalid living conditions, while listening to Castro's firing squads eliminating ''counter revolutionaries'' in the courtyard below his cell. Valladares survived by prayer and by writing poetry whose publication in Europe brought his case to the attention of international figures such as French President Francois Mitterand and to human rights organizations whose constant pressure on the Castro regime finally led to his release. When Against All Hope first appeared, it was immediately compared to Darkness at Noon and other classic prison narratives about the resilience of the human spirit in the face of totalitarianism. Now, with a new introduction by the author, which tells of his life since prison and brings the story of Cuban dissidence up to the case of Elian Gonzalez, Against All Hope is more relevant than ever.

Victorian Prison Lives

This is examined in a series of chapters on every aspect of prison life - from admission procedure, fellow prisoners and the nature of hard labour, diet and discipline to the process of release, which for a long-term prisioner could be as ...

Victorian Prison Lives

Victorian Prison Lives is the first account of the process of imprisionment in England between 1830 and 1914 to be drawn largely from the writings of prisoners themselves. The period was in some ways one of great change, beginning with an astonishing penitentiary experiement when prisons were seen as moral hospitals. But this approach eventually gave way to the idea of penal servitude and created a legacy of harshness and suffering still preserved in the reputations of Portland Chatham and Dartmoor. It was only towards the end of the period that the concept of modern prison administration began to emerge. But while statutary changes where taking place there was an underlying continuity. This is examined in a series of chapters on every aspect of prison life - from admission procedure, fellow prisoners and the nature of hard labour, diet and discipline to the process of release, which for a long-term prisioner could be as daunting as entry into prison.

Prisoners of Hope 111 Inspiring Stories

There comes a time when we, like Lt. Col. Patton, must decide whom we're going to trust. It is the beginning of Christian discipleship. Who controls your life? For nearly a decade I would make regular visits to Donovan Prison, a dark, ...

Prisoners of Hope  111 Inspiring Stories

In response to our quest for something to believe in, Prisoners of Hope: 111 Inspiring Stories provides a series of inspirational short stories based on specific Bible passages and parables. With humor and heartfelt wisdom, readers will learn how ordinary people have found hope in how the words of the Bible have been reflected in their everyday lives. From a baby girl who was abandoned by her mother at a Holiday Inn only to be adopted by a loving family, to the solace that a wealthy man found in the words "In God We Trust" on a found penny, the stories show us that no matter what the circumstances, the answers are always found in the words of the Lord.

Life

Zeno is the pen name of a man who committed a murder and was sentenced to life imprisonment. He tells of his experiences as a prisoner in the Wormwood Scrubs Prison in England.

Life

Zeno is the pen name of a man who committed a murder and was sentenced to life imprisonment. He tells of his experiences as a prisoner in the Wormwood Scrubs Prison in England.