Listening in Everyday Life

that affect our ability to listen intra- and inter-personally are examined. Chapter 3
examines how gender-based listening behavior is acquired, displayed and
interpreted, as well as the social forces that contribute to stereotypes and ...

Listening in Everyday Life

This book addresses the role listening plays in our personal and professional lives, and provides steps we can take to strengthen our own listening skills. Each chapter was written specifically for this book with the intention of introducing the reader to the major theories that affect the processes of listening, and to the impact of listening behavior on our own ability to be effective communicators. Contents: Forward, Ralph Nichols; Preface, Deborah Borisoff and Michael Purdy; Introduction: Why Listening? Deborah Borisoff and Michael Purdy; PART I: Processes and Contexts of Listening; What is Listening?, Michael Purdy; Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Listening: Self Listening and Conscious Action, Michael Purdy; Gender and Listening: Values Revalued, Deborah Borisoff and Dan Hahn; Intercultural Listening, Dean Thomlison; Managing Interpersonal and Team Conflict: Listening Strategies, Patrice Johnson, and Kittie Watson; The New Digital Presence: Listening, Access, and Computer-Mediated Life, Rob Anderson; Listening as an Indiscreet Public Act or Eavesdropping Can Be Fun, Gary Gumpert and Susan J. Drucker; PART II: Listening in the Professions; Listening in the Educational Environment, Carolyn Coakley and Andrew Wolvin; Listening Training: The Key to Success in Today's Organizations, Lyman K. Steil; Listening in the Service Industries: It Makes Good Cents, Judi Brownell; Listening and the Helping Professions, William Arnold; The Lawyer-Client Encounter: Listening for Facts and Relationship, David A. Victor and Cindy Rhodes Victor; Listening: A Crucial Competency for Effective Health Care Delivery, Gary Krepd, Ellen Bonaguro, and Jim Query; Listening in Journalism: All the News We've Heard About That's Fit to Print, Rob Anderson and Mike Killenberg; PART III: Conclusion; Steps to Strengthen Listening Ability, Deborah Borisoff and Michael Purdy; About the Contributors.

Listening in Paris

This book grew from a simple question.

Listening in Paris

This book grew from a simple question. Why did French audiences become silent? Eighteenth-century travelers' accounts of the Paris Opera and memoirs of concertgoers describe a busy, preoccupied public, at times loud and at others merely sociable, but seldom deeply attentive.

Talking and Listening in the Age of Modernity

Listening. to. the. past. Joy Damousi and Desley Deacon The ubiquitous sound of
gun-fire on the Australian gold-fields; the silence of men in the Citroën factory
outside Paris as the giant drop-hammers boomed, the milling machines
screamed ...

Talking and Listening in the Age of Modernity

Issued also in printed form.

Listening In

But I do think that listening remains the richer form of cognitive processing. Radio,
from the dramas of the 1930s up through free form, made people learn how to
pay attention. There are contradictions here, because listening to many of the ...

Listening In

Few inventions evoke such nostalgia, such deeply personal and vivid memories as radio—from Amos ’n’ Andy and Edward R. Murrow to Wolfman Jack and Howard Stern. Listening In is the first in-depth history of how radio culture and content have kneaded and expanded the American psyche. But Listening In is more than a history. It is also a reconsideration of what listening to radio has done to American culture in the twentieth century and how it has brought a completely new auditory dimension to our lives. Susan Douglas explores how listening has altered our day-to-day experiences and our own generational identities, cultivating different modes of listening in different eras; how radio has shaped our views of race, gender roles, ethnic barriers, family dynamics, leadership, and the generation gap. With her trademark wit, Douglas has created an eminently readable cultural history of radio.

Listening In

o - - O LISTENING IN -o: Secret Woize Hozaszo V - Recordings of |NJohn F.
Kennedy selected and introduced by TED WIDMER foreword by *ROLINE
KENNEDY LISTENING IN THE SECRET WHITE HOUSE RECORD |NGS OF
JOHN.

Listening In

To mark John F. Kennedy's centennial, celebrate the life and legacy of the 35th President of the United States. In July 1962, in an effort to preserve an accurate record of Presidential decision-making in a highly charged atmosphere of conflicting viewpoints, strategies and tactics, John F. Kennedy installed hidden recording systems in the Oval Office and in the Cabinet Room. The result is a priceless historical archive comprising some 265 hours of taped material. JFK was elected president when Civil Rights tensions were near the boiling point, and Americans feared a nuclear war. Confronted with complex dilemmas necessitating swift and unprecedented action, President Kennedy engaged in intense discussion and debate with his cabinet members and other advisors. Now, in conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of the Kennedy presidency, the John F. Kennedy Library and historian Ted Widmer have carefully selected the most compelling and important of these remarkable recordings for release, fully restored and re-mastered onto two 75-minute CDs for the first time. Listening In represents a uniquely unscripted, insider account of a president and his cabinet grappling with the day-to-day business of the White House and guiding the nation through a hazardous era of uncertainty. Accompanied by extensively annotated transcripts of the recordings, and with a foreword by Caroline Kennedy, Listening In delivers the story behind the story in the unguarded words and voices of the decision-makers themselves. Listening In covers watershed events, including the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Space Race, Vietnam, and the arms race, and offers fascinating glimpses into the intellectual methodology of a circumspect president and his brilliant, eclectic brain trust. Just as the unique vision of President John F. Kennedy continues to resonate half a century after his stirring speeches and bold policy decisions, the documentary candor of Listening In imparts a vivid, breathtaking immediacy that will significantly expand our understanding of his time in office.

Listening In

Listening In

Mary Vipond's approach is based on the idea that the development of radio broadcasting was a process that involved equipment manufacturers, broadcasters, and "audiences/customers." She charts the expansion of these three groups, surveys the development of advertising and networking as methods of financing, and analyses the evolution of programming. From 1922 to 1932, radio administration was the responsibility of the Radio Branch of the federal Department of Marine and Fisheries. Vipond discusses the regulatory policies of the branch. She completes her study with an analysis of the period from the formation of the Aird Royal Commission on Radio Broadcasting in 1928 to the passage of the Radio Broadcasting Act of 1932. Between 1922 and 1932, virtually all Canadian broadcasting was in the private sector. The campaign in the early 1930s to institute a broadcasting system oriented more toward public service and the promotion of a national identity was partially successful. Vipond reveals, however, that the act that in 1932 set up the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission, now the CBC, was much weaker than has generally been recognized. She argues that this weakness was a consequence of the fact that, over the course of the 1920s, broadcasters, listeners, and politicians alike had built up certain expectations of radio which could not easily be disregarded.

Listening in Language Learning

6 Development of listening ability 6.0 Introduction: listening and language
learning This chapter focuses on principles of developing listening ability. It
begins by formulating what listening ability is, based on aspects of listening
performance ...

Listening in Language Learning

Examines listening as both a means of achieving understanding and as a teachable skill. The underlying theme of the volume is that an integration of cognitive, social, and educational perspectives is necessary in order to characterise effectively what listening ability is and how it may develop. It introduces listening from a cognitive perspective, and presents a detailed investigation of listening in social and educational contexts. The study concludes with an analysis of how listening development can be incorporated effectively into curriculum design.

Attention and Listening in the Early Years

Attention and Listening in the Early Years was developed in response to
increasing concern from schools nationally that children were entering their
reception classes without adequate attention, listening and language skills for
accessing the ...

Attention and Listening in the Early Years

The ability to attend, to listen and to look are prerequisites to all forms of learning. By facilitating children's attention and listening skills, we are able to give them a better chance of achieving their potential in communication, speech and language, and therefore learning skills. Attention and Listening in the Early Years is an innovative course designed for groups of children aged 2-4. Each group session is planned around a theme such as 'The Farm' or 'The Zoo'. The themes provide an anchor for the children to gain meaning from the listening activities, games and songs that will help them learn to sit still, not talk, look at the speaker and think about the words - all vital skills in good listening. Complete with full instructions, including lists of the equipment needed for each session and the auditory and visual objectives of each activity, the book also includes photocopiable detailed preparation plans and shorter prompt plans for use during the sessions. Each session should run for no longer than 15 to 25 minutes, and will be a fun and fruitful alternative to traditional circle-time for early years practitioners such as playgroup and preschool leaders, and speech and language therapists.

Listening in Dreams

I pay attention to characters and stories that arise as a part of patients' dreams,
and I listen deeply with what I call “full body listening” in order to assess the “
edges” which always appear in dream time. Edges are those places in our
psyches ...

Listening in Dreams

"I am waking up, moving through deep layers of sleep-my dream changes-a lively band is playing over in the corner of the room-a small dance floor. I step out from the table and begin to move in time to the music. I'm aware of shadowy figures watching me." Listening in Dreams is a journey into the fascinating world of sound and dreams. Begin an exploration in these pages that you can continue every night during sleep. Learn how to create rituals and play with dreams with your friends and family.

Listening in Medicine

Dr. Livingston proposes listening to the patient, and with magnificent examples
illustrates the results that can be achieved by eliciting what the patient's real
concerns are. He shows that even in the formal setting of an independent
medical ...

Listening in Medicine

Current medical teaching neglects the tale the patient tells or fails to tell. I offer evidence suggesting that such tales or narratives are central to medicine. Readers are invited to consider the evidence whether they are students in the health or social sciences, practioners, teachers, insurance adjusters, lawyers, judges, health planners or general readers. In an age of technical advance the book reveals that fragmented professions fail people whose health problems may be multiple of chronic. Health professionals must return to basic principles, particularly to listening, essential both for diagnosis and for healing. All of us may learn from the wonder and breadth and value of patient's tales in the first section, while the amazing past is revealed in the second. In the final section the value of teaching in the community is noted. The curious story of "whiplash" reveals the extraordinary bias of some researchers and teachers leading to fundamental errors and waste. Truly medicine has its shadows to contrast its light. Finally, family doctors can be recognised as a valued and too often underused resource. REVIEW COMMENT "Dr. Livingston describes his experiences in a readable style. His stories are fascinating and the problems some of them address are profound. In particular, there is the vivid account of the difficulties facing a physician with a patient in a medical crisis who refuses, on religious grounds, conventional treatment. Livingston traces medicine's link with literature throughout history in delightful sketches of Chekov and others." Donald B. Calne, O.C., D.M. Professor of Neurology Emeritus University of British Columbia, Canada

Listening in Detail

I've come to wonder how Pe'rez Prado's grunts—those everywhere interrup—
tions in the American midcentury soundscape—can prepare us for other modes
of listening in detail in the rupture that now divides Cuba and the United States.

Listening in Detail

Listening in Detail is an original and impassioned take on the intellectual and sensory bounty of Cuban music as it circulates between the island, the United States, and other locations. It is also a powerful critique of efforts to define "Cuban music" for ethnographic examination or market consumption. Contending that the music is not a knowable entity but a spectrum of dynamic practices that elude definition, Alexandra T. Vazquez models a new way of writing about music and the meanings assigned to it. "Listening in detail" is a method invested in opening up, rather than pinning down, experiences of Cuban music. Critiques of imperialism, nationalism, race, and gender emerge in fragments and moments, and in gestures and sounds through Vazquez's engagement with Alfredo Rodríguez's album Cuba Linda (1996), the seventy-year career of the vocalist Graciela Pérez, the signature grunt of the "Mambo King" Dámaso Pérez Prado, Cuban music documentaries of the 1960s, and late-twentieth-century concert ephemera.

Teaching Speaking and Listening in the Primary School

Talking to our students about assessment we found that many felt less confident
about doing this in speaking and listening than they did in other ,nrf.or TV.£>T7
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Teaching Speaking and Listening in the Primary School

This newly revised second edition looks at ways in which teachers can develop children's abilities in speaking and listening, as required by the National Curriculum. The authors discuss the links between language and learning; offer case studies and suggestions for classroom practice; and provide stimulating activities to help pupils to become more articulate, coherent and effective in standard English. The book is a suitable text for students taking primary initial teacher training courses. It will also be welcomed as a practical handbook for primary teachers.

The Role of Listening in Asking the Right Questions

In this case, their attentiveness to listening for the secret explosions of nuclear
devices enabled them to hear meteors crashing into the atmosphere long before
any reports were made by “more public” agencies. The sounds of the answer you
 ...

The Role of Listening in Asking the Right Questions

This Element is an excerpt from The Art of Asking: Ask Better Questions, Get Better Answers (9780137144242) by Terry J. Fadem. Available in print and digital formats. It’s not just what you ask: It’s what they hear! Master listening techniques that’ll help you recognize what they’re really hearing when you ask your question. Half of asking any question is how it is received and perceived, and whether it has had the intended impact. Answers alone aren’t a full indication that you have communicated effectively. There are two additional factors: how the question was heard and what you do with the answer. What was heard is key, and managers are sometimes completely unaware of this....

The Art of Listening in the Early Church

It quickly became clear to me, however, that this particular subject would have to
wait until the next book and that I first needed to examine the more basic question
: how did people think about listening, and what evidence do we have of it in ...

The Art of Listening in the Early Church

The sense of hearing was particularly important in the ancient world when the vast majority of people were illiterate. Rhetoric, or the art of speaking, has been given much attention in this context, but the art of listening has been virtually ignored. This book examines the ways in which, by practicing this art, early Christians effectively became 'literate' listeners, with an ability not only to grasp the basic message of the faith but also to follow the ways inwhich it was elaborated, in improvisatory sermons of extraordinary virtuosity, by early Christian teachers. It deals with the practical, as well as the theological issues which listening to anincorporeal, unknowable God raised for early Christians and shows how reflection on them proved to be transformative of their lives as well as their theology.

Technique and Practice of Listening in Intensive Psychotherapy

Richard D. Chessick. TWO LISTENING STANCES c L HAT ARE THESE FIVE
standpoints or channels (models,. Two: Listening Stances.

Technique and Practice of Listening in Intensive Psychotherapy

In this book the author attempts to explain how to master one of the most difficult skills in psychotherapy: the art of listening. It contains references from a variety of fields including philosophy, psychology, psychoanalysis and psychiatry and some helpful practical information. The book will be of interest to mental health professionals, beginners in the field and interested laypersons.

Listening in the Silence Seeing in the Dark

We strove to detect what Erik was experiencing by listening in the spaces
between words , just as we had learned to read between the lines of Erik's
actions when we were together . Shortly after we had arrived in Indiana we had
sought out Dr.

Listening in the Silence  Seeing in the Dark

Traumatic brain injury can interrupt without warning the life story that any one of us is in the midst of creating. When the author's fifteen-year-old son survives a terrible car crash in spite of massive trauma to his brain, she and her family know only that his story has not ended. Their efforts, Erik's own efforts, and those of everyone who helps bring him from deep coma to new life make up a moving and inspiring story for us all, one that invites us to reconsider the very nature of "self" and selfhood. Ruthann Knechel Johansen, who teaches literature and narrative theory, is a particularly eloquent witness to the silent space in which her son, confronted with life-shattering injury and surrounded by conflicting narratives about his viability, is somehow reborn. She describes the time of crisis and medical intervention as an hour-by-hour struggle to communicate with the medical world on the one hand and the everyday world of family and friends on the other. None of them knows how much, or even whether, they can communicate with the wounded child who is lost from himself and everything he knew. Through this experience of utter disintegration, Johansen comes to realize that self-identity is molded and sustained by stories. As Erik regains movement and consciousness, his parents, younger sister, doctors, therapists, educators, and friends all contribute to a web of language and narrative that gradually enables his body, mind, and feelings to make sense of their reacquired functions. Like those who know and love him, the young man feels intense grief and anger for the loss of the self he was before the accident, yet he is the first to see continuity where they see only change. The story is breathtaking, because we become involved in the pain and suspense and faith that accompany every birth. Medical and rehabilitation professionals, social workers, psychotherapists, students of narrative, and anyone who has faced life's trauma will find hope in this meditation on selfhood: out of the shambles of profound brain injury and coma can arise fruitful lives and deepened relationships. Keywords: narrative; selfhood; therapy; traumatic brain injury; healing; spirituality; family crisis; children

Listening In Broadcasts Speeches and Interviews by Elizabeth Bowen

Books. and. Articles. Adorno, Theodor. “Fetish Character in Music and
Regression of Listening.” The Essential Frankfurt School Reader. Eds. Andrew
Arato and Eike Gebhardt. New York: Continuum, 1988. 270–99.

Listening In  Broadcasts  Speeches  and Interviews by Elizabeth Bowen

From the 1940s to the 1960s, Elizabeth Bowen took an active role in spoken media and radio in particular by writing essays for broadcast, improvising interviews on the air and giving public lectures. During her lifetime, she published few of her broadcasts. Listening In brings together a substantial number of her ungathered and unknown works for the first time. Bowen was known as a public intellectual capable of talking on numerous subjects with wit and general insight. Invited to university campuses in the UK and US, she delivered important lectures on language, the 'fear of pleasure', character in fiction, the idea of American homes and other topics. Her first efforts for radio were adaptations of her own short stories and dramatizations of literary subjects. She quickly turned to commentary on culture, such as the beginning of the BBC Third Programme and the atmosphere in postwar Czechoslovakia. She documented her love of cinema in the 1930s and the making of Lawrence of Arabia in the 1960s, and broadcast on Queen Elizabeth II, Katherine Mansfield, Frances Burney and Jane Austen.

Listening in

In this accessible and riveting read, Susan Landau makes a compelling case for the need to secure our data, explaining how we must maintain cybersecurity in an insecure age.

Listening in

A cybersecurity expert and former Google privacy analyst's urgent call to protect devices and networks against malicious hackers and misinformed policymakers New technologies have provided both incredible convenience and new threats. The same kinds of digital networks that allow you to hail a ride using your smartphone let power grid operators control a country's electricity--and these personal, corporate, and government systems are all vulnerable. In Ukraine, unknown hackers shut off electricity to nearly 230,000 people for six hours. North Korean hackers destroyed networks at Sony Pictures in retaliation for a film that mocked Kim Jong-un. And Russian cyberattackers leaked Democratic National Committee emails in an attempt to sway a U.S. presidential election. And yet despite such documented risks, government agencies, whose investigations and surveillance are stymied by encryption, push for a weakening of protections. In this accessible and riveting read, Susan Landau makes a compelling case for the need to secure our data, explaining how we must maintain cybersecurity in an insecure age.

Listening in

For such writers as Samuel Beckett, Michel Leiris, and Robert Pinget, music provides a number of guiding metaphors for the inwardly directed mode of mimesis that Prieto calls "listening in," where the object of representation is not the ...

Listening in

What can music teach a novelist, autobiographer, or playwright about the art of telling stories? The musical play of forms and sounds seems initially to have little to do with the representational function of the traditional narrative genres. Yet throughout the modernist era, music has been invoked as a model for narrative in its specifically mimetic dimension. Although modernist writers may conceive of musical communication in widely divergent ways, they have tended to agree on one crucial point: that music can help transform narrative into a medium better adapted to the representation of consciousness. Eric Prieto studies the twentieth-century evolution of this use of music, with particular emphasis on the postwar Parisian avant-garde. For such writers as Samuel Beckett, Michel Leiris, and Robert Pinget, music provides a number of guiding metaphors for the inwardly directed mode of mimesis that Prieto calls "listening in," where the object of representation is not the outside world but the subtly modulating relations between consciousness and world. This kind of semiotic boundary crossing between music and literature is inherently metaphorical, but, as Prieto's analyses of Beckett, Leiris, and Pinget show, these interart analogies provide valuable clues for bringing to light the unspoken assumptions, obscurely understood principles, and extra-literary aspirations that gave such urgency to the modernist quest to better represent the mind in action.

Listening for Democracy

in chapter 1 we established that very little attention has been paid to listening in
political theory in general and in democratic theory in particular. it is less
surprising in some cases than in others that democratic theory has not engaged
with ...

Listening for Democracy

Although much prized in daily conversation, good listening has been almost completely ignored in that form of political conversation we know as democracy. This book examines the reasons why so little attention has been paid to the listening aspect of democratic conversation, explores the role that listening might play in democracy, and outlines some institutional changes that could be made to make listening more central to democratic processes. The focus on listening amounts to a reorientation of democratic theory and practice, providing novel perspectives on enduring themes in democracy such as recognition, representation, power and legitimacy—as well as some new ones, such as silence. Eschewing the pessimism of the 'realist' turn in democratic theory, the book shows how attention to listening can breathe life into the democratic project and help us to realise some of its objectives. Drawing on practical examples and multidisciplinary sources, the book shows how listening should be at the heart or representative and deliberative democracy rather than peripheral to them. It develops a notion of dialogic democracy based on structured, 'apophatic', listening, and meets the challenge of showing how this could be incorporated in parliamentary democracies. What should we be listening out for? This book addresses the question of political noise and uses the idea of recognition to develop an account of politics that takes us beyond the Aristotelian speaking being towards a Deweyan notion of the 'event' around which publics coalesce.