Utilitarianism in the Early American Republic

Legal Science in the Early Republic: The Origins of American Legal Thought and Education. ... Review of David Hoffman, A Course of Legal Study, The North American Review and Miscellaneous Journal, vol. 6, no. 16, 45–77.

Utilitarianism in the Early American Republic

In Utilitarianism in the Early American Republic James E. Crimmins provides a fresh perspective on the history of antebellum American political thought. Based on a broad-ranging study of the dissemination and reception of utilitarian ideas in the areas of constitutional politics, law education, law reform, moral theory and political economy, Crimmins illustrates the complexities of the place of utilitarianism in the intellectual ferment of the times, in both its secular and religious forms, intersection with other doctrines, and practical outcomes. The pragmatic character of American political thought revealed—culminating in the postbellum rise of Pragmatism—stands in marked contrast to the conventional interpretations of intellectual history in this period. Utilitarianism in the Early American Republic will be of interest to academic specialists, and graduate and senior undergraduate students engaged in the history of political thought, moral philosophy and legal philosophy, particularly scholars with interests in utilitarianism, the trans-Atlantic transfer of ideas, the American political tradition and modern American intellectual history.

Charles Brockden Brown and the Literary Magazine

Cultural Journalism in the Early American Republic Michael Cody. Berthoff , Warner . ... Bicentennial Ed . Vol . 6. Kent : Kent State UP , 1987 . _ . Clara Howard in a Series of Letters with Jane Talbot , a Novel .

Charles Brockden Brown and the Literary Magazine

From 1803 to 1807, Charles Brockden Brown served as editor and chief contributor to the Literary Magazine, and American Register, a popular Philadelphia miscellany. His position allowed him to observe and comment upon life in the United States and transatlantic world during the nineteenth century's first decade. This book considers how Brown's Literary Magazine contributed to the development of cultural cohesiveness and political stability in the young United States. It explores the intellectual and cultural setting in which this Philadelphia miscellany was published, the political writing that appears in what Brown claimed was a politically neutral venue, and the social and cultural criticism that attempts to guide the development of the American character. During his twenty years as an author, he participated in disseminating texts of cultural and literary worth. Brown's essays and reviews assisted in the establishment of reading habits in America and influenced the public reception of the early American press.

A Companion to American Literature

Knowledge is Power: The Diffusion of Information in Early America, 1700–1865. ... Early American Literature, 49(3): 683–705. ... 6. London: Pickering & Chatto. Kames, Lord, H.H. (1765). Elements of Criticism, Vol. I. 3rd edn.

A Companion to American Literature

A comprehensive, chronological overview of American literature in three scholarly and authoritative volumes A Companion to American Literature traces the history and development of American literature from its early origins in Native American oral tradition to 21st century digital literature. This comprehensive three-volume set brings together contributions from a diverse international team of accomplished young scholars and established figures in the field. Contributors explore a broad range of topics in historical, cultural, political, geographic, and technological contexts, engaging the work of both well-known and non-canonical writers of every period. Volume One is an inclusive and geographically expansive examination of early American literature, applying a range of cultural and historical approaches and theoretical models to a dramatically expanded canon of texts. Volume Two covers American literature between 1820 and 1914, focusing on the development of print culture and the literary marketplace, the emergence of various literary movements, and the impact of social and historical events on writers and writings of the period. Spanning the 20th and early 21st centuries, Volume Three studies traditional areas of American literature as well as the literature from previously marginalized groups and contemporary writers often overlooked by scholars. This inclusive and comprehensive study of American literature: Examines the influences of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and disability on American literature Discusses the role of technology in book production and circulation, the rise of literacy, and changing reading practices and literary forms Explores a wide range of writings in multiple genres, including novels, short stories, dramas, and a variety of poetic forms, as well as autobiographies, essays, lectures, diaries, journals, letters, sermons, histories, and graphic narratives. Provides a thematic index that groups chapters by contexts and illustrates their links across different traditional chronological boundaries A Companion to American Literature is a valuable resource for students coming to the subject for the first time or preparing for field examinations, instructors in American literature courses, and scholars with more specialized interests in specific authors, genres, movements, or periods.

Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic

Vol. 1 of From Colonial Times through the Civil War. New York: Citadel Press, 1951. Baepler, Paul, ed. White Slaves, African Masters: An Anthology of American Barbary Captivity Narratives. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1999.

Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic

Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examines the partisan and geopolitical uses of slavery, the conflicts between free states and their slaveholding neighbors, and the political impact of African Americans across the country. Offering a full picture of the politics of slavery in the crucial years of the early republic, Mason demonstrates that partisans and patriots, slave and free--and not just abolitionists and advocates of slavery--should be considered important players in the politics of slavery in the United States.

James McHenry Forgotten Federalist

The American Heritage Dictionary. ... 15, “Colonial and Revolutionary Literature; Early National Literature, Part I,” vol. 6 ... 6. Kahana, “Master and Servant in the Early Republic, 1780–1830,” Journal ofthe Early Republic 20:57. 7.

James McHenry  Forgotten Federalist

A Scots-Irish immigrant, James McHenry determined to make something of his life. Trained as a physician, he joined the American Revolution when war broke out. He then switched to a more military role, serving on the staffs of George Washington and Lafayette. He entered government after the war and served in the Maryland Senate and in the Continental Congress. As Maryland's representative at the Constitutional Convention, McHenry helped to add the ex post facto clause to the Constitution and worked to increase free trade among the states. As secretary of war, McHenry remained loyal to Washington, under whom he established a regimental framework for the army that lasted well into the nineteenth century. Upon becoming president, John Adams retained McHenry; however, Adams began to believe McHenry was in league with other Hamiltonian Federalists who wished to undermine his policies. Thus, when the military buildup for the Quasi-War with France became unpopular, Adams used it as a pretext to request McHenry's resignation. Yet as Karen Robbins demonstrates in the first modern biography of McHenry, Adams was mistaken; the friendship between McHenry and Hamilton that Adams feared had grown sensitive and there was a brief falling out. Moreover, McHenry had asked Hamilton to withdraw his application for second-in-command of the New Army being raised. Nonetheless, Adams's misperception ended McHenry's career, and he has remained an obscure historical figure ever since--until now. James McHenry, Forgotten Federalist reveals a man surrounded by important events who reflected the larger themes of his time.

Washington Irving and the Fantasy of Masculinity

6 (Heidelberg: Winter, 2013); Elias Canetti, Crowds and Power, trans Carol Stewart (1960; New York: Farrar, ... Irving and Money,” Literature in the Early American Republic: Annual Studies on Cooper and His Contemporaries 2 (2010), 220.

Washington Irving and the Fantasy of Masculinity

Washington Irving remains one of the most recognized American authors of the 19th century, remembered for short stories like Rip van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. He also accomplished other writing feats, including penning George Washington's biography and other life stories. Throughout his life, Irving was at odds with socially-approved ways of "being a man." Irving purportedly saw himself and was seen by others as feminine, shy, and non-confrontational. Likely related to this, he chose to engage with other men's fortunes and adventures by writing, defining his male identity vicariously, through masculine archetypes both fictional and non-fictional. Sitting at the intersection of literary studies and masculinity studies, this reading reconstructs Irving's life-long struggle to somehow win a place among other men. Readers will recognize masculine themes in his tales from the Spanish period, his western adventures, as well as in historical biographies of Columbus, Mahomet, and Washington. In many writings by Irving, especially Sleepy Hollow, readers will observe themes dominated by masculinity. The book is the first of its kind to encompass and examine Irving's writings.

Imagining Deliberative Democracy in the Early American Republic

Madison included Harrington's works on a list of 307 books for Congress to purchase in 1783, though the project did ... “The Indian Censures the White Man: 'Indian Eloquence' and American Reading Audiences in the Early Republic,” WMQ, ...

Imagining Deliberative Democracy in the Early American Republic

Deliberation, in recent years, has emerged as a form of civic engagement worth reclaiming. In this persuasive book, Sandra M. Gustafson combines historical literary analysis and political theory in order to demonstrate that current democratic practices of deliberation are rooted in the civic rhetoric that flourished in the early American republic. Though the U.S. Constitution made deliberation central to republican self-governance, the ethical emphasis on group deliberation often conflicted with the rhetorical focus on persuasive speech. From Alexis de Tocqueville’s ideas about the deliberative basis of American democracy through the works of Walt Whitman, John Dewey, John F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King Jr., Gustafson shows how writers and speakers have made the aesthetic and political possibilities of deliberation central to their autobiographies, manifestos, novels, and orations. Examining seven key writers from the early American republic—including James Fenimore Cooper, David Crockett, and Daniel Webster—whose works of deliberative imagination explored the intersections of style and democratic substance, Gustafson offers a mode of historical and textual analysis that displays the wide range of resources imaginative language can contribute to political life.

Civil Society and the Reform of Finance

10 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 5 Wood, The Creation of the American Republic, 418. ... 12; quoted in Lynn A. Parks, Capitalism in Early American Literature: Texts and Contexts, Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature Series, vol.

Civil Society and the Reform of Finance

Efforts to resolve the recent financial crisis have obscured a more deeply rooted financialization crisis that impacts not only the market economy but also the vital civic and moral traditions that support it. This book reveals the cultural influence of finance in reshaping the foundations of American civil society and proposes a return to certain "first principles" of the Republic to restore the nation’s economic vision. This book demonstrates how funding concerns and financial incentives "revalue" faith traditions, educational institutions, non-profit organizations, and even the nation’s healthcare system in ways that are eroding the diversity of American culture. These changes also undermine the ethical framework of both democratic government and the free-market system. While financial influence has diminished the value of civil society, this book proposes that revitalized intermediary institutions still offer the best path forward in restoring the financial sector and, more broadly, enriching the American competitive ethic toward development of a more virtuous economy. The book is written for an academic and professional audience, offering a blueprint for the involvement of civil society with government in providing more communally integrated oversight that could contribute to a genuine democratization of finance.

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic

In this innovative book, Edward Watts demonstrates how American post-Revolutionary literature exhibits characteristics of a post-colonial society.

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic

Writing and Postcolonialism in the Early Republic is the first book-length analysis of early American literature through the lens of postcolonial theory. Although the United States represented a colonizing presence that displaced indigenous peoples and exported imperial culture, American colonists also found themselves exiled, often exploited and abused by the distant metropolitan center. In this innovative book, Edward Watts demonstrates how American post-Revolutionary literature exhibits characteristics of a postcolonial society.The author identifies six texts that particularly exhibit postcolonial qualities: Irving's Knickerbocker's History of New York, Brown's Arthur Mervyn, Murray's The Gleaner, Brackenridge's Modern Chivalry, Tyler's The Algerine Captive, and Watterston's The Lawyer. In each of these books a fictional protagonist attempts to write about the American experience using the language and genres left over from the colonial period. As the fictional authors fail, Watts suggests,we see the,real authors challenging and subverting the lingering colonial culture and its centrality to republican versions of the new nation. In the terms of contemporary postcolonial scholarship from Australia, Canada, and New Zealand, these early American authors worked to decolonize American writing by freeing it from vestigial British conventions.

The Academy and Literature

... Heavy Goods Transport on Common Roads 6/0 JưVENILE Lang ( Andrew ) , The Romance Book The Golliwag Book for 1902. ... History of the American Revolution 10'6 Wharton ( Miss A. H. ) , Social Life in the Early ( American ) Republic .

The Academy and Literature


American Publishers Circular and Literary Gazette

3.00 Volumes 1 to 6 of this work , the first in which Political History has been combined with the detail of Fine Arts ... of that antagon ism between the Northern and Southern Sections of the American Republic , which has brought about ...

American Publishers  Circular and Literary Gazette


American Exceptionalism Vol 1

J. D. Bellin, Demon of the Continent: Indians and the Shaping of American Literature (Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000), pp. 39–70. 6. J. Greene, Intellectual Construction of America: Exceptionalism and Identity ...

American Exceptionalism Vol 1

American exceptionalism ? the idea that America is fundamentally distinct from other nations ? is a philosophy that has dominated economics, politics, religion and culture for two centuries. This collection of primary source material seeks to understand how this belief began, how it developed and why it remains popular.

Gothic Utterance

Gustafson, Sandra M., Imagining Deliberative Democracy in the Early American Republic (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago ... Brown's Edgar Huntly', Early American Literature, 39.2 (2004), 323–54 Hollingshead, John, My Lifetime, vol.

Gothic Utterance

The Gothic has always been interested in strange utterances and unsettling voices – from half-heard ghostly murmurings and the admonitions of the dead, to the terrible cries of the monstrous nonhuman. Gothic Utterance is the first book-length study of the role played by such voices in the Gothic tradition, exploring their prominence and importance in the American literature produced between the Revolutionary War and the close of the nineteenth century. The book argues that the American Gothic foregrounds the overpowering affect and distressing significations of the voices of the dead, dying, abjected, marginalised or nonhuman, in order to undertake a sustained interrogation of what it means to be and speak as an American in this period. The American Gothic imagines new forms of relation between speaking subjects, positing more inclusive and expansive kinds of community, while also emphasising the ethical demands attending our encounters with Gothic voices. The Gothic suggests that how we choose to hear and respond to these voices says much about our relationship with the world around us, its inhabitants – dead or otherwise – and the limits of our own subjectivity and empathy.

The Literary World

Taken together the two series and six volumes of Mr. Hildreth's History constitute a work perfectly unique , the only continuous and complete account of the American Republic which has yet been written . The first two volumes contain a ...

The Literary World


The Sovereign Outsider

19th Century American Literature, (Non-)Discursive Formation and Postanarchist Politics Mathias Hagen König ... In Benton, William (ed.). The Annals of America. Vol. 6. Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., 1968, 298-310.

The Sovereign Outsider

The "Sovereign Outsider" is a literary character of 19th Century American literature that cannot be classified within the cultural, economical, religious, and political (non-)discursive formation of antebellum America. His resistance to associate with any political and social network alludes to the anarchist philosophy of postanarchism that employs post-structuralist and postmodernist approaches. Mathias Hagen König depicts Bartleby, Billy Budd, Huckleberry Finn, Sheppard Lee, Peter Rugg, and Rip van Winkle as prime examples of the "Sovereign Outsider" through the writings of the so-called individualist anarchists Josiah Warren and Stephen Pearl Andrews, the canonical texts of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, and the poems of Walt Whitman. Furthermore, he explores numerous historico-cultural questions: What is the established discursive formation of the United States in the mid-19th Century? What is its subculture? Why does the ideal of a "Sovereign Outsider" appear in American literature of the 19th Century within the writings of politically and poetically incoherent writers? And in how far does antebellum literature represent American culture?

The Early National Period

The Age of Federalism:The Early American Republic,1788–1800. New York:Oxford University Press,1993. ... Volumes 6–8.New York:Macmillan,1916. ———,ed.The Writings of George Washington.Volume 11.New York:G.P.Put- nam's Sons,1891.

The Early National Period

This volume covers the period 1783 to 1828, picking up after the end of the American Revolution and continuing up to the years when America was expanding westward. It provides an overview of the period, a chronology and hundreds of eyewitness testimonies to the political events and social change.

An Empire of Print

The New York Publishing Trade in the Early American Republic Steven Carl Smith ... Diary of Evert Augustus Duyckinck, 23 November 1833, Duyckinck Family Papers, vol. ... Swords to Thomas, 25 May 1830, box 6 (1812–1959), AAS Archives ...

An Empire of Print

Home to the so-called big five publishers as well as hundreds of smaller presses, renowned literary agents, a vigorous arts scene, and an uncountable number of aspiring and established writers alike, New York City is widely perceived as the publishing capital of the United States and the world. This book traces the origins and early evolution of the city’s rise to literary preeminence. Through five case studies, Steven Carl Smith examines publishing in New York from the post–Revolutionary War period through the Jacksonian era. He discusses the gradual development of local, regional, and national distribution networks, assesses the economic relationships and shared social and cultural practices that connected printers, booksellers, and their customers, and explores the uncharacteristically modern approaches taken by the city’s preindustrial printers and distributors. If the cultural matrix of printed texts served as the primary legitimating vehicle for political debate and literary expression, Smith argues, then deeper understanding of the economic interests and political affiliations of the people who produced these texts gives necessary insight into the emergence of a major American industry. Those involved in New York’s book trade imagined for themselves, like their counterparts in other major seaport cities, a robust business that could satisfy the new nation’s desire for print, and many fulfilled their ambition by cultivating networks that crossed regional boundaries, delivering books to the masses. A fresh interpretation of the market economy in early America, An Empire of Print reveals how New York started on the road to becoming the publishing powerhouse it is today.

American Fatherhood

Roediger, David R. The Wages of Whiteness: Race and the Making of the American Working Class. 1991. ... In Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 6: ... The Fair Sex: White Women and Racial Patriarchy in the Early American Republic.

American Fatherhood

Explores the surprising diversity of fathers and fatherhood throughout American history and society The nuclear family has been endlessly praised as the bedrock of American society, even though there has rarely been a time in history when a majority of Americans lived in such families. This book deconstructs the myth of the nuclear family by presenting the rich diversity of family lives in American history from the American Revolution to the twenty-first century. To tell this story, Jürgen Martschukat focuses on fathers and their relations to families and American society. Using biographical close-ups of twelve different characters, each embedded in historical context, American Fatherhood provides a much more realistic picture of how fatherhood has been performed within different kinds of families. Each protagonist covers a crucial period or event in American history, presents a different family constellation, and makes a different argument with regard to how American society is governed through the family.

Weaving the American Catholic Tapestry

Brown, William P. Character Is Crisis: A Fresh Approach to the Wisdom Literature of the Old Testament. ... The American Republic: Its Constitution, Tendencies, and Destiny. ... In The Early Works of Orestes A. Brownson, vol. 6, Life By ...

Weaving the American Catholic Tapestry

Concerned that American Catholic theology has struggled to find its own voice for much of its history, William Portier has spent virtually his entire scholarly career recovering a usable past for Catholics on the U.S. landscape. This work of ressourcement has stood at the intersection of several disciplines and has unlocked the beauty of American Catholic life and thought. These essays, which are offered in honor of Portier's life and work, emerge from his vision for American Catholicism, where Scripture, tradition, reason, and experience are distinct, but interwoven and inextricably linked with one another. As this volume details, such a path is not merely about scholarly endeavors but involves the pursuit of holiness in the "real" world.

African Americans and the Haitian Revolution

“The Evolution of Negro Leadership,” in The Booker T. Washington Papers, Vol. 6 ... Negro American Literature Forum 7 (1973): 53–9. ... “Dangerous Intelligence: Slavery, Race, and St. Domingue in the Early American Republic (Haiti).

African Americans and the Haitian Revolution

Bringing together scholarly essays and helpfully annotated primary documents, African Americans and the Haitian Revolution collects not only the best recent scholarship on the subject, but also showcases the primary texts written by African Americans about the Haitian Revolution. Rather than being about the revolution itself, this collection attempts to show how the events in Haiti served to galvanize African Americans to think about themselves and to act in accordance with their beliefs, and contributes to the study of African Americans in the wider Atlantic World.