Literature and Western Civilization

On the same theme, Albright's Yahweh and the Gods of Canaan (London 1968) includes much literary analysis ... C. h. gordon, Before the Bible: the Common Background of Greek and Hebrew Civilizations (London 1962). f.

Literature and Western Civilization


The Humanities in the Western Tradition

This book follows the organization of The Humanities in the Western Tradition text, yet may be used to supplement other humanities texts.

The Humanities in the Western Tradition

This reader provides a balanced approach to the Humanities course by focusing on intellectual history. Highlighting the human aspect of great artists and thinkers, this text's coverage spans from the Greco-Roman and Judeo-Christian heritage to Modernism and beyond. This book follows the organization of The Humanities in the Western Tradition text, yet may be used to supplement other humanities texts.

An Essay on Western Civilization in Its Economic Aspects

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original.

An Essay on Western Civilization in Its Economic Aspects

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Sources of the West From beginning to 1715

"Sources of the West: Readings in Western Civilization, " Seventh Edition, Volume I Mark Kishlansky, Harvard University "The Sources of the West has the best collection of documents that I have found.

Sources of the West  From beginning to 1715

Sources of the West presents a well-balanced selection of readings that integrate coverage of social, economic, religious, and cultural history within a traditional, political framework. The text includes constitutional documents, political theory, philosophy, imaginative literature, and social description that raise significant issues for classroom discussions or lectures. By analyzing the voices of the past, readers can connect them to the present; learn to understand and respect other cultures; and think critically about history.

The Collapse of Western Civilization

Based on sound scholarship and yet unafraid to speak boldly, this book provides a welcome moment of clarity amid the cacophony of climate change literature.

The Collapse of Western Civilization

The year is 2393, and the world is almost unrecognizable. Clear warnings of climate catastrophe went ignored for decades, leading to soaring temperatures, rising sea levels, widespread drought and—finally—the disaster now known as the Great Collapse of 2093, when the disintegration of the West Antarctica Ice Sheet led to mass migration and a complete reshuffling of the global order. Writing from the Second People's Republic of China on the 300th anniversary of the Great Collapse, a senior scholar presents a gripping and deeply disturbing account of how the children of the Enlightenment—the political and economic elites of the so-called advanced industrial societies—failed to act, and so brought about the collapse of Western civilization. In this haunting, provocative work of science-based fiction, Naomi Oreskes and Eric M. Conway imagine a world devastated by climate change. Dramatizing the science in ways traditional nonfiction cannot, the book reasserts the importance of scientists and the work they do and reveals the self-serving interests of the so called "carbon combustion complex" that have turned the practice of science into political fodder. Based on sound scholarship and yet unafraid to speak boldly, this book provides a welcome moment of clarity amid the cacophony of climate change literature.

Teaching Western American Literature

In this volume experienced and new college- and university-level teachers will find practical, adaptable strategies for designing or updating courses in western American literature and western studies.

Teaching Western American Literature

In this volume experienced and new college- and university-level teachers will find practical, adaptable strategies for designing or updating courses in western American literature and western studies. Teaching Western American Literature features the latest developments in western literary research and cultural studies as well as pedagogical best practices in course development. Contributors provide practical models and suggestions for courses and assignments while presenting concrete strategies for teaching works both inside and outside the canon. In addition, Brady Harrison and Randi Lynn Tanglen have assembled insights from pioneering western studies instructors with workable strategies and practical advice for translating this often complex material for classrooms from freshman writing courses to graduate seminars. Teaching Western American Literature reflects the cutting edge of western American literary study, featuring diverse approaches allied with women’s, gender, queer, environmental, disability, and Indigenous studies and providing instructors with entrée into classrooms of leading scholars in the field.

The Heroine in Western Literature

This book delves first into the literary strata from which the archetypes have been culled, the stories of the Bible and the myths of the Aegean, to look at how the characterization of the goddess was revised.

The Heroine in Western Literature

The impulse that prompts humans to envision themselves as heroic is as inherent to women as to men. The idealization of the hero, however, is an outgrowth of the more primary conception of the god. In Western culture the reduction and eventual denial of the feminine divine has affected cultural perception of feminine principles, particularly archetypal and autonomous patterns. This book delves first into the literary strata from which the archetypes have been culled, the stories of the Bible and the myths of the Aegean, to look at how the characterization of the goddess was revised. Employing evidence from psychology, artifacts and pictorial art, the author shapes an outline for a more authentic figure. The obscure and muted goddess-heroine of ancient literature is then given detail by the articulate voices of the archetype as she reemerges in contemporary fiction.