Lives of the Early Medici

1 CONTESSINA DE ' MEDICI to her son PIERO at Venice DEAREST Son — This day I have received thy letter saying that thou art well and improving every day , which rejoices me . I think thou must wish for news of Cosimo .

Lives of the Early Medici


Lorenzo De Medici at Home

Lives of the Early Medici as Told in Their Correspondence. London: Kessinger, 2006. Rubenstein, Nicolai. The Government ofFlorence Under the Medici (1434-1494). Oxford: Clar— endon Press, 1999. Rubin, Patricia Lee, and Alison Wright.

Lorenzo De  Medici at Home

"An inventory of the private possessions of Lorenzo il Magnifico de' Medici, head of the ruling Medici family during the apogee of the Florentine Renaissance"--Provided by publisher.

LIVES OF THE EARLY MEDICI AS T

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

LIVES OF THE EARLY MEDICI AS T


The Medici Women

Lives of the Early Medici as Told in their Correspondence (London: Chatto & Windus, 1910) and in Maguire (1927). More recent, popular general surveys which go beyond 1537 are P. Bargellini et al. Donne di casa Medici (Florence: Amaud, ...

The Medici Women

The Medici Women is a study of the women of the famous Medici family of Florence in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Natalie Tomas examines critically the changing contribution of the women in the Medici family to the eventual success of the Medici regime and their exercise of power within it; and contributes to our historical understanding of how women were able to wield power in late medieval and early modern Italy and Europe. Tomas takes a feminist approach that examines the experience of the Medici women within a critical framework of gender analysis, rather than biography. Using the relationship between gender and power as a vantage point, she analyzes the Medici women's uses of power and influence over time. She also analyzes the varied contemporary reactions to and representation of that power, and the manner in which the women's actions in the political sphere changed over the course of the century between republican and ducal rule (1434-1537). The narrative focuses especially on how women were able to exercise power, the constraints placed upon them, and how their gender intersected with the exercise of power and influence. Keeping the historiography to a minimum and explaining all unfamiliar Italian terms, Tomas makes her narrative clear and accessible to non-specialists; thus The Medici Women appeals to scholars of women's studies across disciplines and geographical boundaries.

Lives of the Early Medici

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Lives of the Early Medici

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Writing Lives Together

The first letter of this correspondence included in the biography is dated 1839 and the last 1864. ... A Study of Nineteenth-Century 'Hidden' Lives. ... Lives of the Early Medici as told in their Correspondence.

Writing Lives Together

A diary entry, begun by a wife and finished by a husband; a map of London, its streets bearing the names of forgotten lives; biographies of siblings, and of spouses; a poem which gives life to long-dead voices from the archives. All these feature in this volume as examples of ‘writing lives together’: British life writing which has been collaboratively authored and/or joins together the lives of multiple subjects. The contributions to this book range over published and unpublished material from the late eighteenth to the late nineteenth centuries, including biography, auto/biographical memoirs, letters, diaries, sermons, maps and directories. The book closes with essays by contemporary, practising biographers, Daisy Hay and Laurel Brake, who explain their decisions to move away from the single subject in writing the lives of figures from the Romantic and Victorian periods. We conclude with the reflections and work of a contemporary poet, Kathleen Bell, writing on James Watt (1736–1819) and his family, in a ghostly collaboration with the archives. Taken as a whole, the collection offers distinctive new readings of collaboration in theory and practice, reflecting on the many ways in which lives might be written together: across gender boundaries, across time, across genre. This book was originally published as a special issue of Life Writing.

The Rise and Decline of the Medici Bank 1397 1494

Roscoe, William, The Life of Lorenzo de' Medici called the Magnificent. 9th ed. London, 1847. Ross, Janet (ed.). Lives of the Early Medici as told in their Correspondence. Boston, 1911. Ruddock, Alwyn A. Italian Merchants and Shipping ...

The Rise and Decline of the Medici Bank  1397 1494

The roots of modern capitalism go back to the Italian banking system of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance. In the fifteenth century, the Medici Bank succeeded in overshadowing its competitors, the Bardi and the Peruzzi, who were the giants of the fourteenth century, and grew into a vast establishment with branches in most of the large cities of Western Europe. A study of its operations is essential to an understanding of the economic conditions in Europe in the fifteenth century. From a careful study of pertinent documents, including a set of libri segreti (confidential ledgers) discovered in 1950, Professor de Roover has reconstructed the details of the bank’s organization and operating methods; its loan policies, which reflected the Church’s doctrine on usury; its trading and industrial investments; its roles within the Florentine gild system and tax structure; and its activities as financial agent of the Church. He covers every aspect of the bank’s history, from its early years under the management of Giovanni di Bicci de’ Medici to its collapse with the expulsion of the Medici from Florence. “An invaluable contribution to the economic history of the period....A splendid book.”—Harry A. Miskimin, The American Economic Review “The most important work in English on a medieval or Renaissance bank.”—The Economist “The best book ever written on the medieval banking system.”—John T. Noonan, Jr., Harvard Law Review “The most authoritative treatment of its subject in any language.”—Rondo Cameron, The Accounting Review

Natural Particulars

For Lorenzo and Lucrezia , see also Maguire , Women of the Medici , pp . 106-109 ; Ross , Lives of the Early Medici , pp . 113–114 . For Gambacorta , see Barduzzi , Ugolino , p . 32 . 14. Florence , Archivio di Stato : Provvisioni ...

Natural Particulars

Recently the history of science in early modern Europe has been both invigorated and obscured by divisions between scholars of different schools. One school tends to claim that rigorous textual analysis provides the key to the development of science, whereas others tend to focus on the social and cultural contexts within which disciplines grew. This volume challenges such divisions, suggesting that multiple historical approaches are both legitimate and mutually complementary."--

The Life of Lorenzo De Medici Called the Magnificent

Lorenzo de ' Medici intends to retire from public life - Is taken sick and removes to Careggi - His conduct in his last ... de ' Medici to aim at introducing his two elder sons into public life at so early and almost premature an age .

The Life of Lorenzo De  Medici  Called the Magnificent


Boccaccio s Heroines

62 Janet Ross , Lives of the Early Medici as Told in their Letters ( London : Chatto and Windus , 1910 ) , 397 . 63 For a bibliography of the letters and writings of Lucrezia Tornabuoni , as well as scholarship relevant to her life and ...

Boccaccio s Heroines

In this cross disciplinary study of a seminal work of literature and its broader cultural impact, Franklin shows that the stories in Boccaccio's Famous Women were used to promote social ideologies in both Renaissance Tuscany and the dynastic courts of northern Italy. She brings needed clarification to the text by demonstrating that the moral criteria Boccaccio used to judge the lives of legendary women-heroines and miscreants alike-were employed consistently to tackle the challenge that politically powerful women represented for the prevailing social order.

Machiavelli

Lives of the Early Medici. London, 1910. Roth, Cecil. The Last Florentine Republic: 1527–30. London, 1925. Rubenstein, Richard E. Aristotle's Children: How Christians, Muslims, and Jews Rediscovered Ancient Wisdom and Illuminated the ...

Machiavelli

Examines the life of the Florentine intellectual, his relationships with contemporaries ranging from Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo to Cesare Borgia and Pope Alexander VI, his philosophies about power, and the legacy of "The Prince."

The Measure of Man

Vasari, Lives of the Artists, 193. 44. Najemy, History of Florence, 292. 45. ... Pieruzzi, Opere ben vivere, 223. 47. Quoted in Young, Medici, 130. ... Quoted in Ross, Lives of the Early Medici, 105–7. 5. Quoted in Watkins, Humanism and ...

The Measure of Man

It was one of the most concentrated surges of creativity in the history of civilization. Between 1390 and 1537, Florence poured forth an astonishing stream of magnificent artworks. But Florentines did more during this brief period than create masterpieces. As citizens of a fractious republic threatened from below, without, and within, they also were driven to reimagine the political and ethical basis of their world, exploring the meaning and possibilities of liberty, virtue, and beauty. This vibrant era is brought to life in rich detail by noted historian Lawrence Rothfield in The Measure of Man. His highly readable account introduces readers to a city teeming with memorable individuals and audacious risk-takers, capable of producing works of the most serene beauty and acts of the most shocking violence. Rothfield’s cast of characters includes book hunters and book burners, devout Christians and assassins, humble pharmacists and arrogant oligarchs, all caught up in a dramatic struggle—a tragic arc running from the cultural heights of republican idealism in the early fifteenth century, through the aesthetic flowerings and civic vicissitudes of the age of the Medici and Savonarola, to the brooding meditations of Machiavelli and Michelangelo over the fate of the dying republic.

The Memoir of Marco Parenti

A Life in Medici Florence Mark Salber Phillips ... are printed in Fabroni, Laurentii Medicis Magnifici vita (Pisa, I784), 2: 36, and translated in J B Ross, Lives of the Early Medici as Told in Their Correspondence (Boston, 1911), pp.

The Memoir of Marco Parenti

For this vivid description of the world of a Florentine patrician, Mark Phillips draws on Marco Parenti's private letters, ricordanze or diaries, and public history or memoir. When Cosimo de' Medici died in 1464, Parenti foresaw a return to liberty and began to write a history, but his political hopes and his literary ambitions foundered when the Medici party won a decisive victory over their patrician enemies in 1466. Despite this setback, Parenti's historical Memoir, recently rediscovered by Mark Phillips, is our best witness to this major crisis in Florentine politics. Originally published in 1987. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Machiavelli s Florentine Republic

The Lives of the Early Medici as Told in Their Correspondence. London: Chatto and Windus. Rubinstein, Nicolai. 1987. “The History of the Word 'Politicus' in Early-Modern Europe.” In The Languages of Political Theory in Early-Modern ...

Machiavelli s Florentine Republic

What do modern republics have to fear? Machiavelli's Florentine Republic reconstructs Machiavelli's answer to this question from the perspective of the Florentine Histories, his most probing meditation on the fate of republican politics in the modern age. It argues that his principle goal in narrating the defeat of Florentine republicanism is to debunk the views of leading humanists concerning the overall health of republican politics in modernity and the distinctive challenges that modern republics should expect to face. The Medici family had exposed these vulnerabilities better than anyone else, and Machiavelli reconstructs their political strategy to show how conventional ideas of moral and political virtue are the most potent instruments of princely ambition in a city that wants to be free.

Be Like the Fox

Lives of the Early Medici as Told in their Correspondence. London: Chatto Windus. Shaw, James, and Evelyn Welch. 2011. Making and Marketing Medicine in Renaissance Florence. Amsterdam: Rodopi. Tomas, Natalie R. 2003.

Be Like the Fox

GUARDIAN BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017 LONGLISTED FOR THE HISTORICAL WRITERS' ASSOCIATION NON-FICTION CROWN 2017 'A ripping read ... fascinating, charming, enjoyably unorthodox' Daily Telegraph Was Niccolò Machiavelli really the cynical schemer of legend - or was he a profound ethical thinker, who tried to save the democratic freedom of Renaissance Florence as it was threatened by ruthless dynasties? This revelatory biography shows us a man of fox-like dissimulation: a master of disguise in dangerous times. 'A gripping portrait of a brilliant political thinker, who understood the dangers of authoritarianism and looked for ways to curb them' The New Yorker 'Compelling ... this unconventional biography questions whether the philosopher deserves his reputation as an advocate for tyranny' Julian Baggini, Financial Times