Living-downstream Free Download eBook in PDF and EPUB. You can find writing review for Living-downstream and get all the book for free.


Living Downstream

Author: Sandra Steingraber
Publisher: Hachette UK
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Kindle
Size: 29,33 MB
Download: 707
Read Online: 1092

Download


The first edition of Living Downstream—an exquisite blend of precise science and engaging narrative—set a new standard for scientific writing. Poet, biologist, and cancer survivor, Steingraber uses all three kinds of experience to investigate the links between cancer and environmental toxins. The updated science in this exciting new edition strengthens the case for banning poisons now pervasive in our air, our food, and our bodies. Because synthetic chemicals linked to cancer come mostly from petroleum and coal, Steingraber shows that investing in green energy also helps prevent cancer. Saving the planet becomes a matter of saving ourselves and an issue of human rights. A documentary film based on the book will coincide with publication.


Living Downstream

Author:
Publisher:
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Kindle
Size: 16,63 MB
Download: 934
Read Online: 623

Download





Reclaiming the Environmental Debate

Author: Richard Hofrichter
Publisher: MIT Press
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Size: 20,56 MB
Download: 369
Read Online: 1091

Download


An expanding array of hazardous substances poses an increasing threat to public health. But what makes our society a toxic culture are the social arrangements that encourage and excuse the deterioration of human health and the environment. Elements of toxic culture include the unquestioned production of hazardous wastes, economic blight, substandard housing, chronic stress, exploitative working conditions, and dangerous technologies. Toxic culture is also a metaphor for the ways our language, concepts, and values frame debates, ignoring the political conflicts and power relations that influence public health.Reflecting a diversity of voices and critical perspectives, the essays in this book range from critiques of traditional thinking and practices to strategies for shifting public consciousness to create healthy communities. Rather than emphasize policy reform, medical advances, and individual behavior, the essays stress the causes of ill health associated with the production, use, and disposal of resources and, more important, inequality. The contributors include academics, political activists, and artists. Connecting the essays are a recognition of the political and cultural dynamics that influence public health and a commitment to organize against the powerful interests that perpetuate our toxic culture.Contributors : Robin Andersen, Mary Arquette, Marcy Darnovsky, Giovanna Di Chiro, John Bellamy Foster, Mindy Thompson Fullilove, Robert E. Fullilove, III, Al Gedicks, Richard Hofrichter, Joshua Karliner, Charles Levenstein, Timothy W. Luke, Rafael Mares, Branda Miller, Mary H. O'Brien, John O'Neal, Sheldon Rampton, William Shutkin, John Stauber, Sandra Steingraber, Alice Tarbell, John Wooding.


An Invitation to Environmental Sociology

Author: Michael Bell
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF
Size: 27,33 MB
Download: 783
Read Online: 1294

Download


ôI love your book, it is one of the most fascinating I have ever read (certainly the most riveting textbook). The ideas you present are so on keyà I just wanted to let you know how incredible you book is. Thank you for writing it.ö û Student at U. Mass, BostonMichael Bell covers the broad range of topics in environmental sociology with a personal passion rarely seen in sociology texts. An Invitation to Environmental Sociology, 3/eáchallenges readers with the complexity of environmental puzzles. After reading this book, students will be informed and enabled to make their own private and public choices; and inspired to care about the social footprints on the planet.


Environmental Sociology

Author: Leslie King
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Kindle
Size: 19,88 MB
Download: 289
Read Online: 537

Download


With this collection of articles and excerpts, King (sociology, environmental science and policy, Smith College) and McCarthy (sociology and anthropology, College of Charleston) seek to pique students' interests in environmental issues and the ways in which social scientists investigate them. All of the essays were published after 1990, and are org


Watershed Resources Management

Author: K. William Easter
Publisher: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Mobi
Size: 20,93 MB
Download: 162
Read Online: 1086

Download


Today, a systemwide approach to watershed resource management is essential. As recent history has shown, the usual mixture of biophysical management measures are often constrained by institutional factors, frequently producing limited results. This book offers important management alternatives, examining this resource problem within an economic framework, using an interdisciplinary approach. Part I introduces the basic economic, biophysical, social, institutional, and policy aspects of watershed management. Part II illustrates specific watershed approaches through selected case studies from Asia and the Pacific.


Deep Water

Author: Jacques Leslie
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Size: 15,52 MB
Download: 508
Read Online: 848

Download


"If the wars of the last century were fought over oil, the wars of this century will be fought over water." -Ismail Serageldin, The World Bank The giant dams of today are the modern Pyramids, colossally expensive edifices that generate monumental amounts of electricity, irrigated water, and environmental and social disaster. With Deep Water, Jacques Leslie offers a searching account of the current crisis over dams and the world's water. An emerging master of long-form reportage, Leslie makes the crisis vivid through the stories of three distinctive figures: Medha Patkar, an Indian activist who opposes a dam that will displace thousands of people in western India; Thayer Scudder, an American anthropologist who studies the effects of giant dams on the peoples of southern Africa; and Don Blackmore, an Australian water manager who struggles to reverse the effects of drought so as to allow Australia to continue its march to California-like prosperity. Taking the reader to the sites of controversial dams, Leslie shows why dams are at once the hope of developing nations and a blight on their people and landscape. Deep Water is an incisive, beautifully written, and deeply disquieting report on a conflict that threatens to divide the world in the coming years.


River of Contrasts

Author: Margie Crisp
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Kindle
Size: 29,75 MB
Download: 528
Read Online: 831

Download


Writer and artist Margie Crisp has traveled the length of Texas’ Colorado River, which rises in Dawson County, south of Lubbock, and flows 860 miles southeast across the state to its mouth on the Gulf of Mexico at Matagorda Bay. Echoing the truth of Heraclitus’s ancient dictum, the river’s character changes dramatically from its dusty headwaters on the High Plains to its meandering presence on the coastal prairie. The Colorado is the longest river with both its source and its mouth in Texas, and its water, from beginning to end, provides for the state’s agricultural, municipal, and recreational needs. As Crisp notes, the Colorado River is perhaps most frequently associated with its middle reaches in the Hill Country, where it has been dammed to create the six reservoirs known as the Highland Lakes. Following Crisp as she explores the river, sometimes with her fisherman husband, readers meet the river’s denizens—animal, plant, and human—and learn something about the natural history, the politics, and those who influence the fate of the river and the water it carries. Those who live intimately with the natural landscape inevitably formulate emotional responses to their surroundings, and the people living on or near the Colorado River are no exception. Crisp’s own loving tribute to the river and its inhabitants is enhanced by the exquisite art she has created for this book. Her photographs and maps round out the useful and beautiful accompaniments to this thoughtful portrait of one of Texas’ most beloved rivers. Book website: www.coloradorivertx.com Book blog: riverofcontrasts.wordpress.com Author website: www.margiecrisp.com Former first lady Laura Bush unveils this year's Texas Book Festival poster designed by artist Margie Crisp, author of River of Contrasts: The Texas Colorado. The poster features cliff swallows flying over the Colorado River. Photo by Grant Miller


The Plains of Passage with Bonus Content

Author: Jean M. Auel
Publisher: Bantam
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, ePub
Size: 28,45 MB
Download: 121
Read Online: 662

Download


This eBook includes the full text of the novel plus the following additional content: • An exclusive preview chapter from Jean M. Auel’s The Land of Painted Caves, on sale in hardcover March 29, 2011 • An Earth’s Children® series sampler including free chapters from the other books in Jean M. Auel’s bestselling series • A Q&A with the author about the Earth’s Children® series Ayla, the heroine first introduced in The Clan of the Cave Bear, is known and loved by millions of readers. Now, in The Plains of Passage, Ayla’s story continues. Ayla and Jondalar set out on horseback across the windswept grasslands of Ice Age Europe. To the hunter-gatherers of their world--who have never seen tame animals--Ayla and Jondalar appear enigmatic and frightening. The mystery surrounding the woman, who speaks with a strange accent and talks to animals with their own sounds, is heightened by her uncanny control of a large, powerful wolf. The tall, yellow-haired man who rides by her side is also held in awe, not only for the magnificent stallion he commands, but also for his skill as a crafter of stone tools, and for the new weapon he devises, the spear-thrower. In the course of their cross-continental odyssey, Ayla and Jondalar encounter both savage enemies and brave friends. Together they learn that the vast and unknown world can be difficult and treacherous, but breathtakingly beautiful and enlightening as well. All the pain and pleasure bring them closer to their ultimate destination, for the orphaned Ayla and the wandering Jondalar must reach that place on earth they can call home. As sweeping and spectacular as the land she creates, Jean M. Auel’s The Plains of Passage is an astonishing novel of discovery, danger, and love, a triumph for one of the world’s most original and popular authors.


Bird on Fire

Author: Andrew Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Language:
Number of Pages:
Format Type: PDF, Kindle
Size: 11,49 MB
Download: 840
Read Online: 363

Download


Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights. In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density, such as Portland, Seattle, or New York. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all. Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing in their responsibility to address climate change.