Miss Undine's Living Room

A Novel

Miss Undine's Living Room

A candidate for the office of Superintendent of Streets, Parks, and Garbage, middle-aged matron Olive Mackie of Tula Springs, Louisiana, finds her political aspirations thwarted when her ninety-one-year-old Great Uncle L.D. comes under suspicion for murder. Police don't believe that L.D.'s home-care attendant would commit suicide by jumping from a second-floor window -- but Olive, who has heard her uncle demonstrate his excellent memory by reciting important dates in history over and over, thinks he would. Before justice can be done, half the staff of City Hall, a home ec teacher, an uninspired dentist, the principal of a disreputable private school, and several adulterous housewives are implicated in James Wilcox's spectacular plot. His third Tula Springs novel, Miss Undine's Living Room is not only a masterful comedy, exuberant and irreverent, but also a deeply felt examination of the education of the mind and the spirit.

An Elephant in the Living Room

A Leader's Guide for Helping Children of Alcoholics

An Elephant in the Living Room

An Elephant In the Living Room Leader's Guide

A Gentleman's Guide to Graceful Living: A Novel

A Gentleman's Guide to Graceful Living: A Novel

“A tour filled with moments of grace and angst, and an overwhelming sense that compassion matters.” —Minneapolis Star Tribune Arthur Camden’s greatest talents are for packing and unpacking suitcases, making coleslaw, and second-guessing every decision in his life. When his business fails and his wife leaves him—to pursue more aggressive men—Arthur finds that he has none of the talents and finesse that everyone else seems to possess for navigating New York society.

Agents of Innocence: A Novel

Agents of Innocence: A Novel

A "superlative spy novel" (New York Times) by the author of the bestselling espionage thrillers Body of Lies and The Director. Agents of Innocence is the book that established David Ignatius's reputation as a master of the novel of contemporary espionage. Into the treacherous world of shifting alliances and arcane subterfuge comes idealistic CIA man Tom Rogers. Posted in Beirut to penetrate the PLO and recruit a high-level operative, he soon learns the heavy price of innocence in a time and place that has no use for it.

Gossip From the Girls' Room: A Blogtastic! Novel

Gossip From the Girls' Room: A Blogtastic! Novel

It's Diary of a Wimpy Kid for girls! Find out just what happens when class is not in session in this first book in the BLOGTASTIC! series. Gossip from the Girls’ Room fills readers in on all there is to learn about middle school life at Middlebrooke, where Sofia has her very own blog and discusses all the juicy gossip that comes out of the Girls’ room. In Sofia's words . . . Mia St. Claire is only the most popular girl in all of Middlebrooke Middle School. For three very obvious reasons: 1. She's very rich. 2. She has tons of money. 3. She can buy anything and everything she wants. And she does. I'm sure people like her for other reasons too, but none of those reasons are obvious enough for me to really know. Or care about, for that matter.

Clare

A Novel

Clare

Clare Keane is fourteen years old when her mother dies of pneumonia in the tenement room they share in turn-of-the-century Cork, Ireland. Left with two younger brothers, her closest family thousands of miles away in St. Paul, Minnesota, Clare begins a dangerous journey that takes her from Cork through the port of Queenstown to Ellis Island, New York, and finally St. Paul. Rich in historical detail, Clare allows the reader to live the sights, sounds, and smells of a 1906 journey of immigration. "Clare" was named a Reader Favorite Award finalist for 2011.

Family Life: A Novel

Family Life: A Novel

Winner of the 2016 International Dublin Literary Award "Gorgeously tender at its core…beautiful, heartstopping…Family Life really blazes." —Sonali Deraniyagala, New York Times Book Review Hailed as a "supreme storyteller" (Philadelphia Inquirer) for his "cunning, dismaying and beautifully conceived" fiction (New York Times), Akhil Sharma is possessed of a narrative voice "as hypnotic as those found in the pages of Dostoyevsky" (The Nation). In his highly anticipated second novel, Family Life, he delivers a story of astonishing intensity and emotional precision. We meet the Mishra family in Delhi in 1978, where eight-year-old Ajay and his older brother Birju play cricket in the streets, waiting for the day when their plane tickets will arrive and they and their mother can fly across the world and join their father in America. America to the Mishras is, indeed, everything they could have imagined and more: when automatic glass doors open before them, they feel that surely they must have been mistaken for somebody important. Pressing an elevator button and the elevator closing its doors and rising, they have a feeling of power at the fact that the elevator is obeying them. Life is extraordinary until tragedy strikes, leaving one brother severely brain-damaged and the other lost and virtually orphaned in a strange land. Ajay, the family’s younger son, prays to a God he envisions as Superman, longing to find his place amid the ruins of his family’s new life. Heart-wrenching and darkly funny, Family Life is a universal story of a boy torn between duty and his own survival.

Living Room

A Novel

Living Room

“[A] riveting debut novel . . . Unsentimental yet deeply felt, this tale examines what bubbles under the surface of a supposedly happy Long Island family” (Publishers Weekly, starred review). The follow-up to her highly praised debut story collection, The First Hurt, Rachel Sherman’s Living Room is a beautiful and disarmingly direct portrait of a family in trouble. With the tone of a modern-day Jewish The Ice Storm set in Long Island, imbued with Alice Munro’s fascination with personal history, Living Room is a deep exploration of the ripple effects of mental illness on a family, as well as a look at generational differences in mating and marriage, and a wry, wise look at suburban angst. “The fractured lives of three generations of women told with zero sentimentality and a huge amount of heart. Living Room is edgy, moving, smart, funny and altogether human. Rachel Sherman is the real deal.” —Dani Shapiro, New York Times–bestselling author of Inheritance “Sherman turns her unflinching, unsentimental eye once again on deepest suburbia, where personal history festers rather than heals. [Living Room] hums along, its heavier moments tempered with plenty of dark humor and incisive language; but it’s the intimate character sketches that truly resonate.” —Time Out (New York) “Often praised for her lack of sentimentality, Sherman doesn’t hesitate to capture her characters’ weird, unbecoming thoughts . . . Her writing lends itself to the form: her story structures tight as fists, her prose terse and unadorned.” —The Rumpus

Unexpected

Unexpected

It happens at anytime and anywhere. Something called the unexpected which turns our life around. The spice of life that makes things more interesting and unpredictable. We will take a journey together as I offer you these moments in time in the following short stories. You may cry, smile, and feel a wide range of emotions as that is just what the unexpected does to us all. Sit back and read the pages but be prepared for the unexpected.

The Last Rain Of The Winter: A Novel

The Last Rain Of The Winter: A Novel

Balraj, the male protagonist – a voluntarily unmarried man of thirty-five and a son of a rich father – has always proved lucky with his casual relationships with women. But, this time things have gone haywire for him. Police arrest him for his concubine's murder, which, though there is enough material evidence against him, he has not committed. The murderers themselves know not who the real sponsor of the crime is, for they were contacted by a professional crime-mediator. This paid murder results in two other murders; in fact, the unplanned ones precede the planned one, and confusion ensues. Almost everyone on the scene seems equally likely to be behind the trap, before one of them chances upon the reality to discover how, sometimes, things take on a life of their own and hem everyone in their brutal fold.