London s Historic Railway Stations Through Time

About this book The illustrations in this book encourage the reader to explore many aspects of London's major railway stations. They seek to document not only their history, their architecture and the changes that have occurred over the ...

London s Historic Railway Stations Through Time

This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which the capital’s major railway stations have changed and developed over the years.

Surrey Railway Stations Through Time

An Pryer, G. A. & Historical Survey of Selected Southern Stations, Bowring, G.J., Volume 1 (Poole, 1980) Smith, J. D., ... 1996; Country Railway Routes – Croydon, Woodside to East Grinstead, 1995; London Suburban Railways – Caterham and ...

Surrey Railway Stations Through Time

Douglas D'Enno explores the history of Surrey's railway stations.

London s Great Railway Stations

Simmons, Jack and Biddle, Gordon (eds), The Oxford Companion to British Railway History (Oxford University Press, 1997). Betjeman, John, London Railway Stations in Flower of Cities: A Book of London (Max Parrish, 1949).

London s Great Railway Stations

A lavish photographic history of the main railway stations of London for transport buffs and anyone interested in the rich history of London. London has more mainline railway stations than any other city in the world and many of them are amongst its grandest architectural monuments. Its earliest terminals opened in the late 1830s when lines between the capital and the regions were built in the first railway boom. The original station at London Bridge, the capital's first passenger terminus, was opened in December 1836, six months before Queen Victoria came to the throne. The last main line to London, the Great Central Railway to Marylebone, was opened in March 1899, two years before Victoria died. Ever since they originally opened, these stations have been at heart of London life and activity and have dominated the architectural landscape. Many are now in the midst of major reconstructions and are the centrepieces for the transformation of whole swathes of London, from Paddington to King's Cross. This comprehensive story combines a historical overview, archive illustrations and specially commissioned photography, covering the origins of the earliest stations up to the latest reconstructions and renovations. Written by the foremost expert Oliver Green, this is an essential gift for anyone interested in the history of London and its transport.

Waterloo Station Through Time Revised Edition

The catalogue of mislaid items ranged from jewellery, briefcases, books and clothing to innumerable umbrellas and even the occasional pram. ... Further Reading London Historic Railway Stations, by John Betjeman, John.

Waterloo Station Through Time Revised Edition

The fascinating history of Waterloo Station illustrated through old and modern pictures in a fully updated edition.

Paddington Station Through Time

... pause fora moment to look beyond the obvious, they might discover something of thereal London;a vibrant, working citysteeped in layer uponlayer of livinghistory. They woulddo welltostart withthe capital'shistoric railway stations,a ...

Paddington Station Through Time

The changing face of Paddington Station.

Euston Station Through Time

Commercial vehicles enter by way of a service basement road and ramps lead up to the Red Star parcel depot ... a place where we have cometo appreciate London's Victorian stationsas important piecesof architecture, as our heritage, ...

Euston Station Through Time


A World History of Railway Cultures 1830 1930

In 1792, the English adopted a longitudinal standard called meridian time, when clocks in Bristol were set at ten minutes before London.21 In 1840, railway stations throughout England designated London time as “Railway Timeto set ...

A World History of Railway Cultures  1830 1930

A World History of Railway Cultures, 1830-1930 is the first collection of primary sources to historicize the cultural impact of railways on a global scale from their inception in Great Britain to the Great Depression. Its dual purpose is to promote understanding of complex historical processes leading to globalization and generate interest in transnational and global comparative research on railways. In four volumes, organized by historical geography, this scholarly collection gathers rare out-of-print published and unpublished materials from archival and digital repositories throughout the world. It adopts a capsule approach that focuses on short selections of significant primary source content instead of redundant and irrelevant materials found in online data collections. The current collection draws attention to railway cultures through railroad reports, parliamentary papers, government documents, police reports, public health records, engineering reports, technical papers, medical surveys, memoirs, diaries, travel narratives, ethnographies, newspaper articles, editorials, pamphlets, broadsides, paintings, cartoons, engravings, photographs, art, ephemera, and passages from novels and poetry collections that shed light on the cultural history of railways. The editor’s original essays and headnotes on the cultural politics of railways introduce over 200 carefully selected primary sources. Students and researchers come to understand railways not as applied technological impositions of industrial capitalism but powerful, fluid, and idiosyncratic historical constructs.

Victoria Station Through Time

Concrete andsteel were theorder ofthe day, and London's ageing railway stations were looking decidedly shabby and outoffavour. Onthe practical side they stillhad to function efficientlyand cope with ever increasing demand.

Victoria Station Through Time

John Christopher tells the story of Victoria's rich and fascinating history, one spiced by international adventure as well as the hum drum of commuter travel into central London.

London s Historic Railway Terminal Stations

An Illustrated History Geoff Swaine ... The smoke billowing from an N2 tank engine perCoast Main Line with all those great trains run- ning to Scotland. St Pancras was always looked upon as the 'monster next door'; a monstrosity covered ...

London s Historic Railway Terminal Stations

This book covers in pictures, the history and development of London's main terminal stations, looking at the stations through the lens of photographers from Victorian and Edwardian times through to the modern era. The main terminal stations in London have changed greatly in the last 150 years, this volume seeks through pictures to capture the spirit of those changes, showing the often interesting and colorful history of these great and often beautiful structures, that are an important part of our railway heritage.

St Pancras Station Through Time

... the hotel was looking decidedly old fashioned by the time that the London Midland & Scottish Railway (LMS) took ... Chambers to be used and abused as offices for the railway companies, first by the LMS and later by British Rail.

St Pancras Station Through Time

This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which St Pancras Station has changed and developed over the last century and a half.

Northampton Through Time

The town boasted three railway stations, but was not connected to the main line from London to Birmingham until 1881 when the enlargement of Castle station heralded the final removal of the ruins of the once proud castle.

Northampton Through Time

This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which Northampton has changed and developed over the last century.

Wolverhampton Railways Through Time

Railway was curtailed at Wolverhampton and two routes to Birmingham, which were to create a direct link to London, ... whose Stour Valley line linked Birmingham New Streetwith a HighLevel station at Wolverhampton, and the GWR, ...

Wolverhampton Railways Through Time

This fascinating selection of photographs traces some of the many ways in which Wolverhampton's railways have changed and developed over the last century

A History of the Southern Railway

The WLER enabled the LNWR to operate a service between Euston and the South Eastern Railway station at London Bridge via Willesden, West London Junction, Waterloo, then across the concourse to Waterloo Junction and thus to London Bridge ...

A History of the Southern Railway

The story of one of the most iconic railway companies of the great age of steam.

Tourist s Guide to Somersetshire Rail and Road

TOURISTS ' GUIDE THROUGH LONDON Comprising Historical Summary and Notices of the Principal objects of Interest which may be Visited during a few days Residence ; With Lists of the Principal Hotels , Theatres , Railway Stations ...

Tourist s Guide to Somersetshire  Rail and Road


The World s First Railway System

Anon (1981) All Stations: A Journey Through 150 Years of Railway History, London: Thames and Hudson. ... Body, Geoffrey (1990) Railway Stations of Britain: A guide to 75 important centres, Wellingborough: Patrick Stephens Ltd. Brindle, ...

The World s First Railway System

The British railway network was a monument to Victorian private enterprise. Its masterpieces of civil engineering were emulated around the world. But its performance was controversial: praised for promoting a high density of lines, it was also criticised for wasteful duplication of routes. This is the first history of the British railway system written from a modern economic perspective. It uses conterfactual analysis to construct an alternaive network to represent the most efficient alternative rail network that could have been constructed given what was known at the time - the first time this has been done. It reveals how weaknesses in regulation and defects in government policy resulted in enormous inefficiency in the Victorian system that Britain lives with today. British railway companies developed into powerful regional monopolies, which then contested each other's territories. When denied access to existing lines in rival territories, they built duplicate lines instead. Plans for an integrated national system, sponsored by William Gladstone, were blocked by Members of Parliament because of a perceived conflict with the local interests they represented. Each town wanted more railways than its neighbours, and so too many lines were built. The costs of these surplus lines led ultimately to higher fares and freight charges, which impaired the performance of the economy. The book will be the definitive source of reference for those interested in the economic history of the British railway system. It makes use of a major new historical source, deposited railway plans, integrates transport and local history through its regional analysis of the railway system, and provides a comprehensive, classified bibliography.

London s East End Through Time

It has two railway stations, Leyton Midland Road on the Barking to Gospel Oak line and Leyton on the Central line. ... As with most other main roads in the area it has a variety of old and new buildings alongside each other.

London s East End Through Time

The East End of London has always been looked down on by those who live in the rest of the capital. Jack London's People Of the Abyss is just one of the many books written about the poverty, crime and suffering that has blighted the East End throughout the past. As what is now the East End spread out towards Essex, however, the picture has become very different.

Railway Depots Stations Terminals

All Stations: A Journey Through 150 Years of Railway History. Paris: Science Museum (London), 1978. Encyclopedia of American Business ... Down at the Depot: American Railroad Stations from 1831 to 1920. New York: Bramhall House, 1952.

Railway Depots  Stations   Terminals

From the railway's beginnings, the station building, itself, had civic importance greater than ordinary structures. Let historian Brian Solomon show you how beautifully it filled that role. Railway Depots, Stations & Terminals is a unique book about some of the finest, most interesting, and most famous railway stations. Contemporary photographs, historic images, and postcard views provide an in-depth look at the architectural gems that dot the railroad landscape. The railway station has a special role in people's lives. Stations have served as the gateway to the world's great cities and the point of contact for remote towns. The inherent nature of the station is different from that of other buildings; it is an entrance, an exit, a place to rest, and a stop along the way. It can be the first thing a traveler sees and the last memory of a favorite city. Facing both the street and the tracks, the station is naturally a point of departure and a face of the city it serves. Brian Solomon, one of today's most accomplished railway historians, leads you through a one-of-a-kind exploration of the history and architecture of depots, stations, and terminals.

Architectural History Retold

You have only to travel in by rail to Liverpool's Lime Street Station to witness the cliffs of stonework and brick navvies cut into the ground or to go to Baker Street in London to ride the first London Underground tunnel or to go under ...

Architectural History Retold

How much do you know about Greek architecture? Roman? Gothic? The Renaissance? Modernism? Perhaps more importantly, do you know how these are connected or how one style evolved to become another? Or what happened historically during each of these periods? Architectural History Retold is your roadmap for your journey through architectural history. Offering a fresh take on what the author calls the ‘Great Enlightenment project’, it traces the grand narrative of western architecture in one concise, accessible volume. Starting in Ancient Greece and leading up to the present day, Paul Davies' unconventional, engaging style brings the past back to life, helping you to think beyond separate components and styles to recognise ‘the bigger picture’. The author is an academic and journalist with three decades of experience in introducing students to architectural history. The book is based on his successful entry-level course which has used the same unstuffy approach to break down barriers to understanding and engagement and inspire generations of students.

The Little History of Bristol

The opening of the station came almost a year before the first through train from London to Bristol arrived. Isambard Kingdom Brunel was building the Great Western Railway in separate stages, with the first stretch of the line running ...

The Little History of Bristol

No one knows for certain when Bristol was founded. What we do know is that for more than 1,000 years it has been at the centre of national and international history. From its earliest days Bristol’s prosperity was linked to its port, with the importation of wine and tobacco and its involvement with the slave trade. In those days, explorers sailed from Bristol on epic voyages and discovered new lands. In more recent times its economy has been built on creative media and the aerospace industry, including the construction of Concorde, the world’s first supersonic aircraft. From the Avon Gorge’s formation, Iron Age settlers and Norman castle construction, to civil war, riots and bus boycotts, The Little History of Bristol is guaranteed to enthral both residents and visitors alike.

Old and new London a narrative of its history its people and its places by W Thornbury E Walford

CHARING CROSS , THE RAILWAY STATIONS , AND OLD HUNGERFORD MARKET . ... and , in History of England knows , accompanied Edward I. an upper stage , ornamented with eight figures . to the Holy Land , where , on his “ being wounded On Aggas ...

Old and new London  a narrative of its history  its people and its places  by W  Thornbury  E  Walford