Lost Car Companies of Detroit

Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today"--Publisher website.

Lost Car Companies of Detroit

"Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain: Ford, General Motors and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today"--Publisher website.

The End of Detroit

As Micheline Maynard makes brilliantly clear in THE END OF DETROIT, however, the traditional American car industry was, in fact, headed for disaster.

The End of Detroit

An in-depth, hard-hitting account of the mistakes, miscalculations and myopia that have doomed America’s automobile industry. In the 1990s, Detroit’s Big Three automobile companies were riding high. The introduction of the minivan and the SUV had revitalized the industry, and it was widely believed that Detroit had miraculously overcome the threat of foreign imports and regained its ascendant position. As Micheline Maynard makes brilliantly clear in THE END OF DETROIT, however, the traditional American car industry was, in fact, headed for disaster. Maynard argues that by focusing on high-profit trucks and SUVs, the Big Three missed a golden opportunity to win back the American car-buyer. Foreign companies like Toyota and Honda solidified their dominance in family and economy cars, gained market share in high-margin luxury cars, and, in an ironic twist, soon stormed in with their own sophisticatedly engineered and marketed SUVs, pickups and minivans. Detroit, suffering from a “good enough” syndrome and wedded to ineffective marketing gimmicks like rebates and zero-percent financing, failed to give consumers what they really wanted—reliability, the latest technology and good design at a reasonable cost. Drawing on a wide range of interviews with industry leaders, including Toyota’s Fujio Cho, Nissan’s Carlos Ghosn, Chrysler’s Dieter Zetsche, BMW’s Helmut Panke, and GM’s Robert Lutz, as well as car designers, engineers, test drivers and owners, Maynard presents a stark picture of the culture of arrogance and insularity that led American car manufacturers astray. Maynard predicts that, by the end of the decade, one of the American car makers will no longer exist in its present form.

Tales Of Automakers

Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

Tales Of Automakers

The car industry is a big industry with high returns and risks. From the beginning, many car companies appeared, but not everyone was successful. But their stories can also be a lesson we can learn from. Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

The Fail Of Automakers

Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

The Fail Of Automakers

The car industry is a big industry with high returns and risks. From the beginning, many car companies appeared, but not everyone was successful. But their stories can also be a lesson we can learn from. Among more than two hundred auto companies that tried their luck in the Motor City, just three remain Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler. But many of those lost to history have colorful stories worth telling. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade. Author Alan Naldrett explores these and more tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

Car Company Of Detroit

This book tells some tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

Car Company Of Detroit

This book tells some tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade.

Car Industry Of Detroit

This book tells some tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today.

Car Industry Of Detroit

This book tells some tales of automakers who ultimately failed but shaped the industry and designs putting wheels on the road today. For instance, J.J. Cole forgot to put brakes in his new auto, so on the first test run, he had to drive it in circles until it ran out of gas. Brothers John and Horace Dodge often trashed saloons during wild evenings but used their great personal wealth to pay for the damage the next day (if they could remember where they had been). David D. Buick went from being the founder of his own leading auto company to working the information desk at the Detroit Board of Trade.

The History Of Lost Car Companies

Ever wonder how many different automobile manufactures there were?

The History Of Lost Car Companies

Ever wonder how many different automobile manufactures there were? Or were there any strange/weird ideas for early cars that were not very well thought out? In this history of automobiles book, you will discover: - Olds motor works becomes the first car company - The short reign of steam cars - Electric cars short circuit - The rise of detroit's milwaukee junction - Detroit area motorcar companies - Small companies hit the majors for a quick cup of coffee - Independent auto companies consolidate And so much more! Let's dive in and start reading to find out more interesting stories of the automotive makers history!

Michigan s C Harold Wills

He used his money to create one of the first worker model cities at Marysville, Michigan. In this long-overdue biography, Alan and Lynn Lyon Naldrett preserve the legacy of an automotive icon.

Michigan s C  Harold Wills

One of the unsung heroes of the auto world, C. Harold Wills designed the Model T when he worked as Henry Ford's right-hand man. Later, he founded his own company to produce the legendary Wills Sainte Claire. Every endeavor displayed his trademark inventiveness, from the development of the overhead cam engine to the toboggan run on the roof of his house. He used his money to create one of the first worker model cities at Marysville, Michigan. In this long-overdue biography, Alan and Lynn Lyon Naldrett preserve the legacy of an automotive icon.

From Tail Fins to Hybrids How Detroit Lost Its Dominance of the U S Auto Market

of the Detroit automakers from 1945 through the early 1980s. White (1972) explains in great detail how foreign carmakers first entered the U.S. market ...

From Tail Fins to Hybrids  How Detroit Lost Its Dominance of the U  S  Auto Market

This article explores the decline of the Detroit Three (Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors). The author identifies three distinct phases of the decline ¿ the mid-1950s to 1980, 1980 to 1996, and 1996 to 2008 ¿ culminating in the bankruptcies of Chrysler and General Motors in 2009. In showing how the U.S. auto industry has evolved since the mid-1950s, this article provides a historical frame of reference for the ongoing debate about the future of this industry. Tables and graphs.

Lost Dearborn

Of particular interest was the establishment of the Detroit-Dearborn Motor Car Company in 1909. History has shown that long-lasting success in the ...

Lost Dearborn

Throughout its existence, Dearborn has been a pioneer settlement, a multicultural hub, a college town, a major tourism center and a world-renowned industrial city. Unfortunately, due to a variety of factors, significant structures have been lost to time. Almost all of the eleven U.S. Arsenal complex buildings have disappeared since the arsenal was closed in 1875. The hallways of the Edison School and Oxford School still live on in the hearts of their students but were razed long ago. Even beloved edifices such as the Ford Rotunda and the Ford Motor Company Administration building, built by Dearborn's favorite son, Henry Ford, are now only a memory. Author Craig E. Hutchison endeavors to immortalize the important foundational building blocks of an evolving city.

Interurban Knowledge Exchange in Southern and Eastern Europe 1870 1950

See Šuman-Hreblay, Automobile Manufacturers Worldwide Registry. 9. ... 2000), 331–34; Alan Naldrett, Lost Car Companies of Detroit (Charleston, ...

Interurban Knowledge Exchange in Southern and Eastern Europe  1870   1950

Around 1900 cities in Southern and Eastern Europe were persistently labelled "backward" and "delayed." Allegedly they had no alternative but to follow the role model of the metropolises, of London, Paris or Vienna. This edited volume fundamentally questions this assumption. It shows that cities as diverse as Barcelona, Berdyansk, Budapest, Lviv, Milan, Moscow, Prague, Warsaw and Zagreb pursued their own agendas of modernization. In order to solve their pressing problems with respect to urban planning and public health, they searched for best practices abroad. The solutions they gleaned from other cities were eclectic to fit the specific needs of a given urban space and were thus often innovative. This applied urban knowledge was generated through interurban networks and multi-directional exchanges. Yet in the period around 1900, this transnational municipalism often clashed with the forging of urban and national identities, highlighting the tensions between the universal and the local. This interurban perspective helps to overcome nationalist perspectives in historiography as well as outdated notions of "center and periphery." This volume will appeal to scholars from a large number of disciplines, including urban historians, historians of Eastern and Southern Europe, historians of science and medicine and scholars interested in transnational connections.

More Cadillac V 16s Lost and Found

Mr. Kosmatka said that the man who sold him the big Cadillac had been employed by one of the Detroit car companies, but was laid off and living on his ...

More Cadillac V 16s Lost and Found

In 1930, Cadillac rolled out a line of new cars of unsurpassed elegance and craftsmanship that would launch the company into the top tier of luxury carmakers. While competitors produced models with eight or twelve-cylinder engines, Cadillac offered the smooth, powerful performance of a V-16. Over the next 11 years, each of the nearly 4000 V-16s was as close to hand-made as a commercial auto manufacturer could come. Their drivers included statesmen, celebrities, businessmen and, sometimes, well-heeled ne'er-do-wells. Many of the cars survived wartime scrap drives, obsolescence, lack of replacement parts, neglect and the elements. This follow-up volume to Cadillac V-16s Lost and Found (2014) documents the individual stories of 67 more of these magnificent machines.

The Underclass Debate

Between 1953 and 1960 , Detroit's East Side lost ten plants and 71,137 ... In 1947 one of Detroit's automobile manufacturers employed 13,000 workers in its ...

The  Underclass  Debate

Examining the claim that an emerging underclass reveals an unprecedented crisis in American society, this collection of essays studies a complex set of processes that has been at work for a long period, degrading inner cities and the nation as a whole.

Lemon Aid New Cars and Trucks 2011

Yet GM's revenues were only three-fourths of what they were when GM lost a ... In other words, the leaner Detroit automakers can now make a profit at an ...

Lemon Aid New Cars and Trucks 2011

As U.S. and Canadian automakers and dealers face bankruptcy and Toyota battles unprecedented quality-control problems, Lemon-Aid guides steer the confused and anxious buyer through the economic meltdown unlike any other car-and-truck books on the market. Phil Edmonston, Canada’s automotive "Dr. Phil" for more than 40 years, pulls no punches. In this all-new guide he says: Chrysler’s days are numbered with the dubious help of Fiat. Electric cars and ethanol power are PR gimmicks. Diesel and natural gas are the future. Be wary of "zombie" vehicles: Jaguar, Land Rover, Saab, and Volvo. Mercedes-Benz – rich cars, poor quality. There’s only one Saturn you should buy. Toyota – enough apologies: "when you mess up, ’fess up."

Turning the Pages of American Girlhood

Streetcar companies often advertised for women who were related to carmen; ... between car companies, unions, and women conductors broke out in Detroit and ...

Turning the Pages of American Girlhood

"Alternating chapters of historical background and literary analysis, this study argues that postbellum series books inspired young women by illustrating the ways in which girls could participate in social change. The book adds to the existing scholarship on girls' culture by tracing the shifting social ideologies of girlhood throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries"--Provided by publisher.

Made in the USA

and Toyotas in Tennessee created new manufacturing jobs, other jobs were lost in existing plants of the US automakers, whose market share continued to fall ...

Made in the USA

An argument that America's economy needs a strong and innovative manufacturing sector and the jobs it creates.

Motor City Barn Finds

Detroit's Lost Collector Cars Tom Cotter ... numerous component suppliers that provided parts to the numerous auto manufacturers that called Detroit home.

Motor City Barn Finds

Ride along on the search for forgotten automotive gems in the Motor City. Detroit has been America's Motor City for decades. It's home to Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler, as well as numerous auto industry companies and specialty and speed shops. At the same time, it's the poster child for urban blight and dysfunction. It's truly a city of contrasts, which presented challenges and opportunities in equal measure to barn finder Tom Cotter. In Motor City Barn Finds, Cotter plies his trade in a locale rich with automotive history. Detroit's lost cars are abandoned in empty lots, resident in decrepit buildings, squirreled away in garages, and stashed in historic wrecking yards. Behind the wheel of his classic 1939 Ford Woodie, Cotter trolls the back streets and neighborhoods of this historic city looking for lost automotive gems accompanied by photographer Michael Alan Ross. As America's Motor City, Detroit is an emotional and historical mecca for car enthusiasts, capable of drawing hundreds of thousands of car people for events like Woodward Dream Cruise and attracting design-forward companies like Shinola. At the same time, it's intimidating to navigate, with numerous dodgy neighborhoods and risky abandoned factory sites. Add it all together and you have fascinating and intriguing opportunities to dig for barn-find gold.

Why America Lost the War on Poverty And How to Win It

The big three automakers built twenty-five plants in the metropolitan area of Detroit, ... production jobs (55,000); the other nine lost 680,000 positions.

Why America Lost the War on Poverty  And How to Win It

In a provocative assessment of American poverty and policy from 1950 to the present, Frank Stricker examines an era that has seen serious discussion about the causes of poverty and unemployment. Analyzing the War on Poverty, theories of the culture of poverty and the underclass, the effects of Reaganomics, and the 1996 welfare reform, Stricker demonstrates that most antipoverty approaches are futile without the presence (or creation) of good jobs. Stricker notes that since the 1970s, U.S. poverty levels have remained at or above 11%, despite training programs and periods of economic growth. The creation of jobs has continued to lag behind the need for them. Stricker argues that a serious public debate is needed about the job situation; social programs must be redesigned, a national health care program must be developed, and economic inequality must be addressed. He urges all sides to be honest--if we don't want to eliminate poverty, then we should say so. But if we do want to reduce poverty significantly, he says, we must expand decent jobs and government income programs, redirecting national resources away from the rich and toward those with low incomes. Why America Lost the War on Poverty--And How to Win It is sure to prompt much-needed debate on how to move forward.

Two Billion Cars

... of the three Detroit companies had slid all the way to 28.5 percent in 2007. Toyota sold more cars to the retail market in California than GM, Ford, ...

Two Billion Cars

Today there are over a billion vehicles in the world, and within twenty years, the number will double, largely a consequence of China's and India's explosive growth. Given that greenhouse gases are already creating havoc with our climate and that violent conflict in unstable oil-rich nations is on the rise, will matters only get worse? Or are there hopeful signs that effective, realistic solutions can be found? Blending a concise history of cars and their impact on the world, leading transportation experts Daniel Sperling and Deborah Gordon explain how we arrived at this state, and what we can do about it. Sperling and Gordon assign blame squarely where it belongs-on the auto-industry, short-sighted government policies, and consumers. They explore such solutions as getting beyond the gas-guzzler monoculture, re-inventing cars, searching for low-carbon fuels, and more. Promising advances in both transportation technology and fuel efficiency together with shifts in traveler behavior, they suggest, offer us a way out of our predicament. The authors conclude that the two places that have the most troublesome emissions problems--California and China--are the most likely to become world leaders on these issues. Arnold Schwarzenegger's enlightened embrace of eco-friendly fuel policies, which he discusses in the foreword, and China's forthright recognition that it needs far-reaching environmental and energy policies, suggest that if they can tackle the issue effectively and honestly, then there really is reason for hope. Updated with a new afterword that sheds light on the profound changes in the global economy in the last year, Two Billion Cars makes the case for why and how we need to transform transportation now more than ever. "Authoritatively prescriptive." --Tom Vanderbilt, Wilson Quarterly "Provocative and pleasurable, far-seeing and refreshing, fact-based and yet a page-turner, global in scope but rooted in real places. The authors make a convincing case that smart consumers driving smart electric-drive cars can find the critical path to a safer planet." --Robert Socolow, Princeton University "In this insightful and persuasive book, Sperling and Gordon highlight one of the biggest environmental challenges of this century: two billion cars. They rightly contend that we cannot avert the worst of global warming without making our cars cleaner and petroleum-free. Luckily the authors also offer a roadmap for navigating this problem that is both visionary and achievable." --Frances Beinecke, President, Natural Resources Defense Council

Detroit

Then , in 1980 , the U.S. auto industry experienced an economic slide unparalleled since the Great Depression . The car giants lost $ 3.5 billion , 250,000 ...

Detroit

Hub of the American auto industry and site of the celebrated Riverfront Renaissance, Detroit is also a city of extraordinary poverty, unemployment, and racial segregation. This duality in one of the mightiest industrial metropolises of twentieth-century North America is the focus of this study. Viewing the Motor City in light of sociology, geography, history, and planning, the authors examine the genesis of modern Detroit. They argue that the current situation of metropolitan Detroit—economic decentralization, chronic racial and class segregation, regional political fragmentation—is a logical result of trends that have gradually escalated throughout the post-World War II era. Examining its recent redevelopment policies and the ensuing political conflicts, Darden, Hill, Thomas, and Thomas, discuss where Detroit has been and where it is going. In the series Comparative American Cities, edited by Joe T. Darden.