Love and Freindship [sic] ILLUSTRATED

Love and Freindship [sic] ILLUSTRATED

About Author: Jane Austen (/ˈɒstɪn, ˈɔːs-/; 16 December 1775 - 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism, humour, and social commentary, have long earned her acclaim among critics, scholars, and popular audiences alike.With the publications of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published posthumously in 1818, and began another, eventually titled Sanditon, but died before its completion. She also left behind three volumes of juvenile writings in manuscript, a short epistolary novel Lady Susan, and another unfinished novel, The Watsons. Her six full-length novels have rarely been out of print, although they were published anonymously and brought her moderate success and little fame during her lifetime.A significant transition in her posthumous reputation occurred in 1833, when her novels were republished in Richard Bentley's Standard Novels series, illustrated by Ferdinand Pickering, and sold as a set. They gradually gained wider acclaim and popular readership. In 1869, fifty-two years after her death, her nephew's publication of A Memoir of Jane Austen introduced a compelling version of her writing career and supposedly uneventful life to an eager audience.Austen has inspired many critical essays and literary anthologies. Her novels have inspired many films, from 1940's Pride and Prejudice to more recent productions like Sense and Sensibility (1995), Emma (1996), Mansfield Park (1999), Pride & Prejudice (2005), and Love & Friendship (2016).Product Description: Love and Freindship [sic] is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven until she was eighteen, Austen wrote her tales in three notebooks. These still exist, one in the Bodleian Library and the other two in the British Museum. They contain, among other works, Love and Freindship, written when she was fourteen, and The History of England, written when she was fifteen.Written in epistolary form like her later unpublished novella, Lady Susan, Love and Friendship is thought to be one of the tales she wrote for the amusement of her family. It was dedicated to her cousin Eliza de Feuillide, known as "La Comtesse de Feuillide". The instalments, written as letters from the heroine Laura, to Marianne, the daughter of her friend Isabel, may have come about as nightly readings by the young Jane in the Austen home. Love and Freindship (the misspelling is one of many in the story) is clearly a parody of romantic novels Austen read as a child. This is clear even from the subtitle, "Deceived in Freindship and Betrayed in Love", which undercuts the title.In form, the story resembles a fairy tale in featuring wild coincidences and turns of fortune, but Austen is determined to lampoon the conventions of romantic stories, down to the utter failure of romantic fainting spells, which always turn out badly for the female characters. The story shows the development of Austen's sharp wit and disdain for romantic sensibility, characteristic of her later novels.The 2016 film Love & Friendship is a film version of Lady Susan, borrowing only the title from Love and Freindship.Source: Wikipedia

Love and Freindship [sic]

And Other Early Works

Love and Freindship [sic]

Although Jane Austen is best known for novels such as Pride and Prejudice that deal with romantic entanglements and class conflicts, she was also a skilled essayist and humor writer. In "Love and Freindship" (sic), Austen sends up the epistolary novels that were popular in her day, as well as skewering some of the satire-worthy ideas about love and marriage that were common in the era.

Love and Freindship

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Love and Freindship

Love and Freindship [sic] is a juvenile story by Jane Austen, dated 1790. From the age of eleven until she was eighteen, Austen wrote her tales in three notebooks. These still exist, one in the Bodleian Library and the other two in the British Museum.

Love and Friendship

Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times

Love and Friendship

These collected essays demonstrate that compelling and illuminating discussions of love and friendship do not fall to psychologists alone, but rightly belong among the major thinkers in the history of political philosophy.

LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP, with A HISTORY OF ENGLAND

LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP, with A HISTORY OF ENGLAND

George Farquhar's best known play, produced time out of mind but nw hard to find. Still a most enjoyable read or produce ... CALLENDER CLASSIC REPRINTS

Quicklet on Jane Austen's Love and Friendship (CliffNotes-like Summary)

Quicklet on Jane Austen's Love and Friendship (CliffNotes-like Summary)

ABOUT THE BOOK “Why are all the female characters so boring?” my eleven year old daughter asked me, peering up through her thick glasses. We had just seen yet another animated movie. “No one is ironic, at all. They are all pretty and sweet. Blech.” Jane Austen clearly shared my daughter’s lament, and spent her life writing novels that subverted and sometimes outright lampooned the popular literary tropes of her time. Love and Friendship is one of Austen’s earliest works, written when the author was only 14, and is penned with broadest literary strokes. The series of letters from the hapless Laura to the young Marianne creates a story that can be described, as her nephew J. E. Austen Leigh puts it, as “a burlesque.” Like most girls, I was first introduced to Jane Austen when Pride and Prejudice was assigned by my tenth grade English teacher. When I read “it is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.” I took it as a truth universally acknowledged. Life’s experiences have taught me to appreciate the rich irony and intelligence with which Austen crafted the story of the Bennett sisters, and the story of Love and Friendship of poor Laura and her crowd. The irony is less elegant, less subtle, but the intelligence is fierce and mordant and the prose is a delight. EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK In the fifth letter, Laura’s family is roused by the knocking of a stranger and his servant. After much debate about the significance of the rapping on the door, the strangers are admitted into the house. When Laura lays eyes on the gentleman, her “natural sensibility (that) had already been greatly affected by the sufferings of the unfortunate stranger and no sooner did I first behold him, than I felt that on him the happiness or Misery of my future Life must depend.” This “noble youth” informs Laura that his name is Edward Lindsay, though Laura decides to conceal the name by referring to him as Talbot. He confides that his father is an English Baronet, tragically “seduced by the false glare of Fortune and the Deluding Pomp of Title” and has promised his hand in marriage to the Lady Dorothea. Edwards rejects this arrangement, exclaiming, “never shall it be said that I obliged my Father!” Laura and her family “admired the noble Manliness of his reply.” Edward takes Laura’s hand, and they are instantly married by Laura’s father, though “he had never taken orders” and lacked the capacity to perform a legitimate marriage. Laura and Edward travel to his aunt’s house in Middlesex, where they meet Edward’s sister, Augusta, who greets Laura with “coldness and forbidding reserve.” Lady Dorothea briefly visits as well before the unexpected arrival of Edward’s father, Sir Edward, who has come to admonish his son for this marriage. Edward, “with heroic fortitude” defends his marriage and then departs with Laura at once for to the home of his friend Augustus and Augustus’ wife, Sophia. Buy a copy to keep reading!

Love and Friendship and Other Early Works

Love and Friendship and Other Early Works

A collection of juvenile writings, including: Love and Friendship (sic), Lesley Castle, The History of England, Collection of Letters, and Scraps. According to Wikipedia: "Jane Austen (1775 – 1817) was an English novelist whose realism, biting social commentary and masterful use of free indirect speech, burlesque and irony have earned her a place as one of the most widely read and most beloved writers in English literature. Austen lived her entire life as part of a small and close-knit family located on the lower fringes of English gentry. She was educated primarily by her father and older brothers as well as through her own reading. The steadfast support of her family was critical to Austen's development as a professional writer. Austen's artistic apprenticeship lasted from her teenage years until she was about thirty-five years old. During this period, she experimented with various literary forms, including the epistolary novel which she tried and then abandoned, and wrote and extensively revised three major novels and began a fourth. From 1811 until 1815, with the release of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1815), she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published after her death in 1817, and began a third, which was eventually titled Sanditon, but died before completing it."