Low Speed Aerodynamics

With extensive illustrations and examples, this book will be useful for senior and beginning graduate-level courses, as well as a helpful reference tool for practising engineers.

Low Speed Aerodynamics

Low-speed aerodynamics is important in the design and operation of aircraft flying at low Mach number, and ground and marine vehicles. This 2001 book offers a modern treatment of the subject, both the theory of inviscid, incompressible, and irrotational aerodynamics and the computational techniques now available to solve complex problems. A unique feature of the text is that the computational approach (from a single vortex element to a three-dimensional panel formulation) is interwoven throughout. Thus, the reader can learn about classical methods of the past, while also learning how to use numerical methods to solve real-world aerodynamic problems. This second edition has a new chapter on the laminar boundary layer (emphasis on the viscous-inviscid coupling), the latest versions of computational techniques, and additional coverage of interaction problems. It includes a systematic treatment of two-dimensional panel methods and a detailed presentation of computational techniques for three-dimensional and unsteady flows. With extensive illustrations and examples, this book will be useful for senior and beginning graduate-level courses, as well as a helpful reference tool for practising engineers.

LOW SPEED AERODYNAMICS

This book is primarily intended for the undergraduate students of aeronautical engineering and aerospace engineering.

LOW SPEED AERODYNAMICS

The book aims at explaining the fundamental principles of aerodynamics from an engineer’s point of view. Right from the beginning, it conveys a basic understanding of the behaviour of the real viscous fluid. Later, through appropriate approximations, the ideal inviscid fluid is introduced. It gives a clear exposition of the fundamentals of fluid dynamics, both viscous and inviscid, including the topic of boundary layer. The text provides introductory concepts of wind tunnel and measurements to give a balanced overview of the subject so that the students are exposed to experiments and laboratory practices at the outset. It emphasises the physics of various aspects of the fluid flow phenomenon so that the reader develops a ‘physical feel’ of the subject. This book is primarily intended for the undergraduate students of aeronautical engineering and aerospace engineering. KEY FEATURES • Use of a large number of flow visualisation photographs for illustration • Use of a large number of innovative diagrams • Adequate number of worked-out examples at the end of almost all the chapters • A set of exercise problems at the end of every chapter

Thrust Induced Effects on Low Speed Aerodynamics of Fighter Aircraft Langley 4 By 7 Meter Tunnel

Results of NASA Langley has conducted wind-tunnel investigations of several fighter configurations conducted to determine the effects of both thrust vectoring and spanwise blowing are reviewed.

Thrust Induced Effects on Low Speed Aerodynamics of Fighter Aircraft   Langley 4  By 7 Meter Tunnel

Results of NASA Langley has conducted wind-tunnel investigations of several fighter configurations conducted to determine the effects of both thrust vectoring and spanwise blowing are reviewed. A recent joint NASA/Grumman Aerospace Corporation/U.S. Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to examine the effects of spanwise blowing on the trailing-edge flap system. This application contrasts with the more familiar method of spanwise blowing near the wing leading edge. Another joint program among NASA/McDonnell Aircraft Company/U.S. Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory investigated the effects of reverse thrust on the low-speed aerodynamics of an F-15 configuration. The F-15 model was fitted with a rotating van thrust reverser concept which could simulate both in-flight reversing for approach and landing or full reversing for ground roll reduction. The significant results of these two joint programs are reported. Banks, D. W. and Quinto, P. F. and Paulson, J. W., Jr. Langley Research Center NASA-TM-83277, NAS 1.15:83277 RTOP 505-42-23-01

Low speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 17 percent thick Airfoil Section Designed for General Aviation Applications

"An investigation was conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the low-speed two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 17-percent thick airfoil designed for general aviation applications.

Low speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 17 percent thick Airfoil Section Designed for General Aviation Applications

"An investigation was conducted in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the low-speed two-dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of a 17-percent thick airfoil designed for general aviation applications. The results are compared with a typical older NACA 65 series airfoil section. Also, a comparison between experimental data and predictions, based on a theoretical method for calculating the viscous flow about the airfoil, is presented. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range from 0.10 to 0.28 and an angle-of-attack range from -10° to 24°. Reynolds numbers, based on the airfoil chord, were varied from about 2.0x106 to 20.0x106. The results of the investigation indicate that maximum section lift coefficients increased rapidly at Reynolds numbers from about 2.0x106 to 6.0x106 and attained values greater than 2.0 for the plain airfoil and greater than 3.0 with a 20-percent-chord split flap deflected 60°. Stall characteristics were generally gradual and of the trailing-edge type either with or without the split flap. At a lift coefficient of 1.0 (climb condition) the section lift-drag ratio increased from about 65 to 85 as the Reynolds number increased from about 2.0x106 to 6.0x106. Maximum section lift coefficients were about 30 percent greater than that of a typical older NACA 65 series airfoil section and the section lift-drag ratio at a lift coefficient of 0.90 was about 50 percent greater. Agreement of experimental results with predictions based on a theoretical method which included viscous effects was good for the pressure distributions as long as no boundary-layer flow separation was present, but the theoretical method predicted drag values greatly in excess of the measured values."--P. [1].