Magnificat Puns

50 Brain Teasers for Cat Lovers and Others Nan Clark. MAGNIFICAT PUNS 50 Brain Teasers for Cat Lovers and Others ;./“' , ' a > 4 ' ' 3 '§ ; W' , "MWci WWI-1“ with Ca'toons by Eric Brake MAGNIFICAT PUNS MAGNIFICAT PUNS (50 Brain Teasers ...

Magnificat Puns

MAGNIFICAT PUNS gives new meaning to the word PURRseverance. --Joan O'Brien, Andover, VT PURRsonally speaking, I had lots of fun trying to figure out these brain teasers. --Barbara Murray, Mesa, AZ MAGNIFICAT PUNS accomplished its PURRPUSS of making me laugh. --Joe Martz, New York City I found the puns to be very CATchy. --Pat Chaplain, Easton, MD We hope to PURRsuade everyone we know to buy this book! --Fritz and Mary Kautz, Mahwah, NJ

Christopher Smart s English Lyrics

Hebrew again as 'El', God.43 Smart's pun invests his vision of a verbal world with true significance. ... We can see this shapeshifting in play with Smart's identification of the Jubilate as 'my MAGNIFICAT' (B43).

Christopher Smart s English Lyrics

In the first full-length study of Christopher Smart’s translations and the place and function of translation in Smart’s poetry, Rosalind Powell proposes a new approach to understanding the relationship between Smart’s poetics and his practice. Drawing on translation theory from the early modern period to the present day, this book addresses Smart's translations of Horace, Phaedrus and the Psalms alongside the better-known religious works such as Jubilate Agno and A Song to David. Five recurrent threads run throughout Powell’s study: the effect of translation on the identity of a narrative voice in a rewritten text; the techniques that are used to present translated texts to a new literary, cultural and linguistic readership; performance and reading contexts; the translation of great works as an attempt to achieve literary permanence; and, finally, the authorial influence of Smart himself in terms of the overt religiosity and nationalism that he champions in his writing. In exploring Smart’s major translation projects and revisiting his original poems, Powell offers insights into classical reception and translation theory; attitudes towards censorship; expressions of nationalism in the period; developments in liturgy and hymnody; and the composition of children’s books and school texts in the early modern era. Her detailed analysis of Smart’s translating poetics places them within a new, contemporary context and locality to uncover the poet's works as a coherent project of Englishing.

Mania and Literary Style

The Magnificat thus serves to “magnify” not only God, but also, and above all, the dispossessed. ... For I pray the Lord Jesus to translate my MAGNIFICAT into verse and represent it.73 Both the wordplay and the levelling sense of ...

Mania and Literary Style

This study analyzes 'enthusiastic' writing from the Ranters to Swift, and explores madness and sanity in literature.

Poets of Sensibility and the Sublime

For I pray the Lord Jesus to translate my MAGNIFICAT into verse and represent it . ... or from one species to another ; and ( 3 ) the pun on Magnificat which turns the word into a compound ( Magnifi - cat ) and so establishes fully the ...

Poets of Sensibility and the Sublime

A collection of critical essays on English poetry during the Age of Sensibility and the Sublime, the half-century between the death of Alexander Pope in 1744 and the death of Robert Burns in 1796.

ELH Essays for Earl R Wasserman

For I pray the Lord Jesus to translate my MAGNIFICAT into verse and represent it . ... or from one species to another ; and 3. the pun on Magnificat which turns the word into a compound ( Magnifi - cat ) and so establishes fully the ...

ELH Essays for Earl R  Wasserman

"Earl R. Wasserman began his association with ELH in 1943, serving first as editor and then as senior editor until his death in March 1973. The following essays, written by friends, colleagues, and former students, were presented to honor his memory"--Preface, pg.vii.

Mocking Bird Technologies

On puns, see Hartman, “Christopher Smart's 'Magnificat ... The pun is Smart's: “Let Bedan rejoice with Ossifrage—the bird of prey and the man of prayer” (B 54). 49. From A 104 to B122 all the birds rejoice with only three exceptions: ...

Mocking Bird Technologies

Contributors: Madeleine Brainerd, Joe Conway, Fraser Easton, Christopher GoGwilt, Shari Goldberg, Melanie D. Holm, Sarah Kay, Kaori T. Kitao, Holt V. Meyer, Isabel A. Moore, Fawzia Mustafa, Gavin Sourgen.​ Mocking Bird Technologies brings together a range of perspectives to offer an extended meditation on bird mimicry in literature: the way birds mimic humans, the way humans mimic birds, and the way mimicry of any kind involves technologies that extend across as well as beyond languages and species. The essays examine the historical, poetic, and semiotic problem of mimesis exemplified both by the imitative behavior of parrots, starlings, and other mocking birds, and by the poetic trope of such birds in a range of literary and philological traditions. Drawing from a cross-section of traditional periods and fields in literary studies (18th-century studies, romantic studies, early American studies, 20th-century studies, and postcolonial studies), the collection offers new models for combining comparative and global studies of literature and culture. Editors Christopher GoGwilt is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Fordham University. He is the author of The Passage of Literature: Genealogies of Modernism in Conrad, Rhys, and Pramoedya (Oxford, 2011), The Fiction of Geopolitics: Afterimages of Culture from Wilkie Collins to Alfred Hitchcock (Stanford, 2000), and The Invention of the West: Joseph Conrad and the Double-Mapping of Europe and Empire (Stanford, 1995). Melanie D. Holm is Assistant Professor of the English Department and Graduate Program of Literature and Criticism at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. She also teaches in the university’s Women’s and Gender Studies program. Her scholarly focus is on eighteenth-century literature and skepticism. Contributors Madeleine Brainerd taught at Washington University in St. Louis and at Excelsior College. Since 2004 she has taught therapeutic yoga and medical qi gong in New York City, at the Integral Yoga Institute, Kenshikai Dojo, Gouverneur Hospital, and other venues. She studies histories of yoga’s intersections with ecological in/justice, animality, and affect theory. Joe Conway is an Assistant Professor of American Literature at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. His articles have appeared or are scheduled to appear in the journals Women’s Studies, Early American Literature, and Nineteenth-Century Contexts. He is currently at work on a monograph about the social life of antebellum money that charts how discourses of noneconomic phenomena such as medicine, race, nationalism, and aesthetics informed nineteenth-century debates about what constitutes good money. Fraser Easton is Associate Professor of English, University of Waterloo, Canada. A specialist in eighteenth-century literature, he has published on Jane Austen, Daniel Defoe, Maria Edgeworth, and Christopher Smart, as well as on newspaper records and historical accounts of passing women in the eighteenth century. Shari Goldberg is Assistant Professor of English at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She is the author of Quiet Testimony: A Theory of Witnessing from Nineteenth-Century American Literature (Fordham, 2013). She has also published essays on silence, politics, and personhood in American literature. Her current research focuses on late-nineteenth-century models of mind and person in narrative and psychological writing. Sarah Kay teaches French and Medieval Studies at New York University. She has written widely on medieval literature across languages, genres, and periods; her work combines the study of medieval texts, especially troubadour songs, with philosophical and theoretical inquiry. Her two most recent books are Parrots and Nightingales: Troubadour Quotations and the Development of European Poetry (2013) and Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries (2017). Kaori Kitao (William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Art History, Emerita, Swarthmore College) taught art history at Swarthmore College from 1966 to 2001. She was born in Tokyo and studied architecture at UC Berkeley and art history at Harvard. Her main specialization is Italian renaissance and baroque art; she has also taught courses in cinema history, material culture, urban studies, and Japanese architecture. Holt V. Meyer is Professor of Slavic Studies at Erfurt University. He is the author of Romantische Orientierung (1995) and numerous articles and has co-edited the collections Juden und Judentum in Literatur und Film des slavischen Sprachraumes. Die geniale Epoche (1999), Inventing Slavia (2005), Schiller: Gedenken—Vergessen—Lesen (2010), and Gagarin als Archivkörper und Erinnerungsfigur (2014). He is co-editor of the new book series Spatio-Temporality. Practices—Concepts— Media (De Gruyter). He is currently working on a book about the official Stalinist Pushkin celebrations of 1949. Isabel (Annie) Moore completed her Ph.D. in comparative literature at the University of California–Irvine. From 2011 to 2013, she held a postdoctoral fellowship in English at the University of Victoria. She has published on Contemporary Irish and Canadian poetry, and her book project is titled The Ends of Lyric Life: A Theory of Biopoetics. Fawzia Mustafa is Professor of English and African and African American Studies at Fordham University. She also teaches in the university’s Comparative Literature and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies Programs. The author of V. S. Naipaul (1995), she has published numerous articles on postcolonial literature and development. Gavin Sourgen is Visiting Assistant Professor of English at the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College of Florida Atlantic University. He completed his D.Phil. at Balliol College (Oxford) in 2013, concentrating on the transitional poetics of Lord Byron’s verse, and has published on Byron, Coleridge, and romantic aesthetics in general.

Bach

a Magnificat of his own. ... The word Magnificat opens the text, which, according to the gospel of Luke, Mary sang upon learning that she would give birth ... The musical pun was used by composers of psalms from Monteverdi to Vivaldi.

Bach

"Bach is an entirely new volume in the "Master Musicians" series, replacing the old entry by Malcolm Boyd with updated coverage of the composer's life and works. Tracing the composer's biography from origins in Thuringia to mastery as cantor and music director at Leipzig, the book sets Bach in the cultural context of early modern Europe. Family life, social structure, and court culture are among the topics examined from the perspective of contemporary approaches to history. Bach's work as student, organist, music director, and teacher is considered alongside his compositions, with discussions of representative examples from all the major categories, including concertos, cantatas, chamber music, and pieces for harpsichord and for organ. In addition to a handy list of works and other useful reference matter included in every volume of the series, this book is also accompanied by an online supplement that offers a glossary, a guide to further reading, and audio versions of the numerous music examples"--

Geoffrey Hartman

The Fate of Reading When Christopher Smart writes in Jubilate Agno, “For I pray the Lord Jesus to translate my MAGNIFICAT into verse and represent it,” the pun (magnifi-cat) alluding to the “magnification' of the cat Jeoffrey and of the ...

Geoffrey Hartman

`The critic explicitly acknowledges his dependence on prior words that make his word a kind of answer. He calls to other texts "that they might answer him."' Geoffrey Hartman is the first book devoted to an exploration of the `intellectual poetry' of the critic who, whether or not he `represents the future of the profession', is a unique and major voice in twentieth-century criticism. Professor Atkins explains clearly Hartman's key ideas and places his work in the contexts of Romanticism and Judaism on which he has written extensively. In Geoffrey Hartman he provides a valuable introduction to a major critical voice who has called into question our assumptions about the distinction between commentary and imaginative literature.

The Music of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach

The Magnificat was originally in E-flat (BWV 243a); the familiar D-major version (BWV 243) dates from 1732–35, ... The reuse of the opening music for the “Sicut erat” (As it was in the beginning) was an old music-rhetorical pun, ...

The Music of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach

Of the four sons of J. S. Bach who became composers, Carl Philipp Emanuel (1714-88) was the most prolific, the most original, and the most influential both during and after his lifetime. This first full-length English-language study critically surveys his output, examining not only the famous keyboard sonatas and concertos but also the songs, chamber music, and sacred works, many of which resurfaced in 1999 and have not previously been evaluated. The book also outlines the composer's career from his student days at Leipzig and Frankfurt (Oder) to his nearly three decades as court musician to Prussian King Frederick "the Great" and his last twenty years as cantor at Hamburg. Focusing on the composer's choices within his social and historical context, the book shows how C. P. E. Bach deliberately avoided his father's style while adopting the manner of his Berlin colleagues, derived from Italian opera. A new perspective on the composer emerges from the demonstration that C. P. E. Bach, best known for his virtuoso keyboard works, refashioned himself as a writer of vocal music and popular chamber compositions in response to changing cultural and aesthetic trends. Supplementary texts and musical examples are included on a companion website. David Schulenberg is professor of music at Wagner College and teaches historical performance at the Juilliard School. He is the author of The Music of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (University of Rochester Press, 2010).

William Byrd

Ascension Mass of the Ascension 25-29 Magnificat antiphon, second Vespers 30 Whitsun Mass of Pentecost 31-36 Magnificat antiphon, first Vespers 37 ... The play on the name 'Peter' is wholly in keeping with the puns Byrd and other people ...

William Byrd

This is the first comprehensive study of William Byrds life (1540-1623) and works to appear for sixty years, and fully takes into consideration recent scholarship. The biographical section includes many newly discovered facts about Byrd and his family, while in the chapters dealing with his music an attempt is made for the first time to outline the chronology of all his compositions. The book begins with a detailed account of Byrd's life, based on a completely fresh examination of original documents, which are quoted extensively. Several previously known documents have now been identified as being in Byrds hand, and some fresh holographs have been discovered. A number of questions such as his parentage and date of birth have been conclusively settled. The book continues with a survey of Byrds music which pays particular attention to its chronological development, and links it where possible to the events and background of his life. A series of appendices includes additional texts of important documents, and a summary catalogue of works. A bibliography and index complete the book. Besides musical illustrations there is a series of plates illustrating documents and places associated with Byrd.

The Playfulness of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Hopkins puns on “asleep unawakened” (resting, dead), “blow” (gale, stroke), “hurls off” (speeds ahead, ... Hopkins's next poem was “The May Magnificat,” 10 written a month later in May 1878, after he had moved to Stonyhurst College.

The Playfulness of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Renowned Hopkins expert Joseph J. Feeney, SJ, offers a fresh take on Gerard Manley Hopkins which shakes our understanding of his poetry and his life and points towards the next phase in Hopkins studies. While affirming the received view of Hopkins as a major poet of nature, religion, and psychology, Feeney finds a pervasive, rarely noticed playfulness by employing both the theory of play and close reading of his texts. This new Hopkins lived a playful life from childhood till death as a student who loved puns and jokes and wrote parodies, comic verse, and satires; as a Jesuit who played and organized games and had "a gift for mimicry;" and most significantly, as a poet and prose stylist who rewards readers with unexpected displays of whimsy and incongruity, even, strikingly, in "The Wreck of the Deutschland," "The Windhover," and the "Terrible Sonnets." Feeney convincingly argues that Hopkins's distinctive playfulness is inextricably bound to his sense of fun, his creativity, his style, and his competitiveness with other poets. In unexpected images, quirky metaphors, strange perspectives, puns, coinages, twisted syntax, wordmusic, and sprung rhythm, we see his playful streak burst forth to adorn those works critics consider his most brilliant. No one who absorbs this book's radical readings will ever see and hear Hopkins's poetry and prose quite the way they used to.

Latin Church Music In England 1460 1575

John Browne , almost certainly a scholar at Eton , also used the “ Regali ex progenie ' plainsong in his four - part Stabat virgo mater Christi , conceivably with the same pun in mind . Fayrfax's Regali Mass and Magnificat had a third ...

Latin Church Music In England  1460 1575


The Oxford Handbook of Theology Sexuality and Gender

These are not jokes or puns. ... Sometime in the sixth century, St Benedict's Rule prescribed the Magnificat at Vespers and ... The Magnificat is Mary's song in Luke about her motherhood, and Psalm 110 became God's song about 'his', ...

The Oxford Handbook of Theology  Sexuality  and Gender

Selected essays draw on reason as a distinct source of theology, discussing evolutionary biology and behavioural genetics, psychology, anthropological research, philosophical research, and queer theory. It examines the history of theologies of sexuality and gender, with close analysis of the Bible and the Christian tradition.

The Animal Claim

... Lamb/ lamb in, 136; “Let” lines of, 139–41; as “MAGNIFICAT,” 136, 144; on passion, 133–34; publication of, 147; puns in, 141–42; The Task compared to, 153; translation references in, 144–45 justice: Arendt on, 183; political, 54–55, ...

The Animal Claim

During the eighteenth century, some of the most popular British poetry showed a responsiveness to animals that anticipated the later language of animal rights. Such poems were widely cited in later years by legislators advocating animal welfare laws like Martin’s Act of 1822, which provided protections for livestock. In The Animal Claim, Tobias Menely links this poetics of sensibility with Enlightenment political philosophy, the rise of the humanitarian public, and the fate of sentimentality, as well as longstanding theoretical questions about voice as a medium of communication. In the Restoration and eighteenth century, philosophers emphasized the role of sympathy in collective life and began regarding the passionate expression humans share with animals, rather than the spoken or written word, as the elemental medium of community. Menely shows how poetry came to represent this creaturely voice and, by virtue of this advocacy, facilitated the development of a viable discourse of animal rights in the emerging public sphere. Placing sensibility in dialogue with classical and early-modern antecedents as well as contemporary animal studies, The Animal Claim uncovers crucial connections between eighteenth-century poetry; theories of communication; and post-absolutist, rights-based politics.

Early Music Review

I liked the opening ' pun ' : you think you are hearing an introduction to a Basque folk carol and instead it leads to ... Sweelinck Gaude et laetare ; Tallis Magnificat as ; Victoria Alma redemptoris mater a5 This doesn't fully warrant ...

Early Music Review


Devotional Interaction in Medieval England and its Afterlives

... recalling the Magnificat ('Magnificat anima mea Dominum, et exsultavit spiritus meus in Deo salvatore meo, ... This carol's burden puns on the idea of Jankyn singing to Mary, with Alison, with the Mass Ordinary chant Kyrie eleyson.

Devotional Interaction in Medieval England and its Afterlives

The interdisciplinary volume Devotional Interaction in Medieval England and its Afterlives examines the interaction between medieval English worshippers and the material objects of their devotion, with chapters that extend the temporality of objects and buildings beyond the Middle Ages.

Staging Contemplation

Because of the familiarity of the Latin Magnificat even to Latin-illiterate audiences, hearers of this scene, ... Through the formal and linguistic structures of the acrostic, the puns, and code-switching, the Mary plays stage how ...

Staging Contemplation

What does it mean to contemplate? In the Middle Ages, more than merely thinking with intensity, it was a religious practice entailing utter receptiveness to the divine presence. Contemplation is widely considered by scholars today to have been the highest form of devotional prayer, a rarified means of experiencing God practiced only by the most devout of monks, nuns, and mystics. Yet, in this groundbreaking new book, Eleanor Johnson argues instead for the pervasiveness and accessibility of contemplative works to medieval audiences. By drawing together ostensibly diverse literary genres—devotional prose, allegorical poetry, cycle dramas, and morality plays—Staging Contemplation paints late Middle English contemplative writing as a broad genre that operated collectively and experientially as much as through radical individual disengagement from the world. Johnson further argues that the contemplative genre played a crucial role in the exploration of the English vernacular as a literary and theological language in the fifteenth century, tracing how these works engaged modes of disfluency—from strained syntax and aberrant grammar, to puns, slang, code-switching, and laughter—to explore the limits, norms, and potential of English as a devotional language. Full of virtuoso close readings, this book demonstrates a sustained interest in how poetic language can foster a participatory experience of likeness to God among lay and devotional audiences alike.

Annual

In pursuing this line of enquiry , synoptic puns become evident as soon as we start to translate the Synoptic Gospels back into Hebrew . Luke 1 , 46. In the Magnificat the first stich begins with μeyaλóvel which can only be the ...

Annual


Annual of the Swedish Theological Institute

In pursuing this line of enquiry , synoptic puns become evident as soon as we start to translate the Synoptic Gospels back into Hebrew . Luke 1 , 46. In the Magnificat the first stich begins with payahúvel which can only be the ...

Annual of the Swedish Theological Institute