Making the Mummies Dance

Inside The Metropolitan Museum Of Art

Making the Mummies Dance

The former director of the famed New York museum recounts his activities at the art world's pinnacle, from wooing important patrons to battling for acquisitions.

False Impressions

False Impressions

The former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art examines the world of art forgery, from ancient times to the present, sharing anecdotes about some of the costliest, most embarrassing forgeries ever, as well as the motives of the fakers

Art For Dummies

Art For Dummies


Greatest Works of Art of Western Civilization

Greatest Works of Art of Western Civilization

A former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York chooses the 111 works of art--culled from the entire history of Western civilization--that have influenced him most, reproduced in full-color and complemented by his interpretations. Tour.

Pharma

Greed, Lies, and the Poisoning of America

Pharma

Award-winning journalist and New York Times bestselling author Gerald Posner traces the heroes and villains of the trillion-dollar-a-year pharmaceutical industry and uncovers how those once entrusted with improving life have often betrayed that ideal to corruption and reckless profiteering—with deadly consequences. Pharmaceutical breakthroughs such as anti­biotics and vaccines rank among some of the greatest advancements in human history. Yet exorbitant prices for life-saving drugs, safety recalls affecting tens of millions of Americans, and soaring rates of addiction and overdose on pre­scription opioids have caused many to lose faith in drug companies. Now, Americans are demanding a national reckoning with a monolithic industry. Pharma introduces brilliant scientists, in-corruptible government regulators, and brave whistleblowers facing off against company exec­utives often blinded by greed. A business that profits from treating ills can create far deadlier problems than it cures. Addictive products are part of the industry’s DNA, from the days when corner drugstores sold morphine, heroin, and cocaine, to the past two decades of dangerously overprescribed opioids. Pharma also uncovers the real story of the Sacklers, the family that became one of America’s wealthiest from the success of OxyContin, their blockbuster narcotic painkiller at the center of the opioid crisis. Relying on thousands of pages of government and corporate archives, dozens of hours of interviews with insiders, and previously classified FBI files, Posner exposes the secrets of the Sacklers’ rise to power—revelations that have long been buried under a byzantine web of interlocking companies with ever-changing names and hidden owners. The unexpected twists and turns of the Sackler family saga are told against the startling chronicle of a powerful industry that sits at the intersection of public health and profits. Pharma reveals how and why American drug com­panies have put earnings ahead of patients.

Contemporary Perspectives on the Detection, Investigation and Prosecution of Art Crime

Australasian, European and North American Perspectives

Contemporary Perspectives on the Detection, Investigation and Prosecution of Art Crime

In the world of law enforcement art and antiquity crime has in the past usually assumed a place of low interest and priority. That situation has now slowly begun to change on both the local and international level as criminals, encouraged in part by the record sums now being paid for art treasures, are now seeking to exploit the art market more systematically by means of theft, fraud and looting. In this collection academics and practitioners from Australasia, Europe and North America combine to examine the challenges presented to the criminal justice system by these developments. Best practice methods of detecting, investigating, prosecuting and preventing such crimes are explored. This book will be of interest and use to academics and practitioners alike in the areas of law, crime and justice.

The Exhibitionist: Living Museums, Loving Museums

The Exhibitionist: Living Museums, Loving Museums

In the great tradition of Thomas Hoving’s national bestseller, Making The Mummies Dance, the fascinating memoir by the curator who breathed life into museums At once a field guide on how to appreciate museums—and the art within its walls—and an ebullient and entertaining memoir, renowned museum director Karl Katz’s The Exhibitionist shows how he made museums inviting, educational, living and vibrant. In his endeavors to make museums contemporary and relevant, Katz travels the globe: as an archaeologist in the newly-formed state of Israel to his covert entry, using forged documents, into the overly anti-Semitic Egypt of the late 1950s, through the New York City of the ‘60s and ‘70s and into the present day. A man who always stood up for the museum visitor, Katz takes readers through his brilliant and accomplished life. A book for readers of history, art criticism, collectors, curators, administrators and students, The Exhibitionist is filled with a wide range of discussions both cultural and personal. Katz shows readers how Biblical archaeology played a crucial role in the cause of Israel nationalism, while also recounting his time trying to bring broadcast television and home-video technology to museums in the 1980s. Perfect for anyone who has ever been captivated by a well-curated exhibit.

Summer in the City

John Lindsay, New York, and the American Dream

Summer in the City

Summer in the City takes a clear look at John Lindsay’s tenure as mayor of New York City during the tumultuous 1960s, when President Lyndon Johnson launched his ambitious Great Society Program. Providing an even-handed reassessment of Lindsay’s legacy and the policies of the period, the essays in this volume skillfully dissect his kaleidoscope of progressive ideas and approach to leadership—all set in a perfect storm of huge demographic changes, growing fiscal stress, and an unprecedented commitment by the federal government to attain a more equal society. Compelling archival photos and a timeline give readers a window into the mythic 1960s, a period animated by civil rights marches, demands for black power, antiwar demonstrations, and a heroic intergovernmental effort to redistribute national resources more evenly. Written by prize-winning authors and leading scholars, each chapter covers a distinct aspect of Lindsay’s mayoralty (politics, race relations, finance, public management, architecture, economic development, and the arts), while Joseph P. Viteritti’s introductory and concluding essays offer an honest and nuanced portrait of Lindsay and the prospects for shaping more balanced public priorities as New York City ushers in a new era of progressive leadership. The volume’s sharp focus on the controversies of the Mad Men era will appeal not only to older readers who witnessed its explosive events, but also to younger readers eager for a deeper understanding of the time. A progressive Republican with bold ideals and a fervent belief in the American Dream, Lindsay strove to harness the driving forces of modernization, democratization, acculturation, inclusion, growth, and social justice in ways that will inform our thinking about the future of the city. -- Mike Wallace, Pulitzer Prize–winning coauthor of GothamDick Ravitch, Former Lieutenant Governor of New York, 2009–2010

Tutankhamun

The Untold Story

Tutankhamun

Part history, part detective story, this book recounts the brief life and reign of the boy Pharaoh Tutankhamun.