Gender Gap

Now available in paperback with a new introduction by the authors, this accessible volume integrates work from a variety of fields, applying a new paradigm to research on gender differences.

Gender Gap

Let's face it, say Barash and Lipton: Males and females, boys and girls, men and women are different. To be sure, these differences are often heightened by distinctions in learning, cultural tradition, and social expectation, but underpinning them all is a fundamental difference that derives from biology. Throughout the natural world, males are those creatures that make sperm; females make eggs. The oft-noticed "gender gap" derives, in turn, from this "gamete gap." In Gender Gap, Barash and Lipton (husband and wife, professor and physician, biologist and psychiatrist) explain the evolutionary aspects of male-female differences. After describing the theory underlying the evolutionary explanation of male-female differences-in accessible, lay-person's language-they show how it applies to specific examples of animal behavior. Then, they demonstrate comparable male-female differences in the behavior of human beings cross-culturally, as well as within the United States. Barash and Lipton apply this approach to male-female differences in sexual inclinations, propensities for violence, parenting styles, and childhood experiences. They invoke much work within the traditional social sciences, such as psychology, anthropology, and sociology, which have typically ignored biological factors in the past. Part of the highly successful revolution in scientific thought has been the recognition that evolutionary insights can illuminate behavior, no less than anatomy and physiology. This new discipline, sometimes called "sociobiology" or "evolutionary psychology," promises to help us make sense of ourselves and of our most significant others, shedding new light on what it means to be male or female. Now available in paperback with a new introduction by the authors, this accessible volume integrates work from a variety of fields, applying a new paradigm to research on gender differences. David P. Barash holds a Ph.D. in zoology and is professor of psychology and zoology at the University of Washington, where he has taught since 1973. He has been especially active in the growth and development of sociobiology as a scientific discipline and has received numerous grants and awards. Barash is the author of more than 170 technical articles, and 20 books. Judith Eve Lipton received her M.D. degree from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and completed her residency in psychiatry at the University of Washington. She is the founder and president emerita of the Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility, and Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, specializing in women's health.

The Great Sex Divide

Illustrated by charts & diagrams, this is useful as an up-to-date textbook for psychology classes, but is still eminently readable for the lay person. Social & political implications of identified differences are discussed.

The Great Sex Divide

Prominent University of London psychologist surveys the result of scientific studies of psychological differences between males & females, & discusses the social & political limitations thereof. Explores traditional stereotypes while revealing new information derived from controlled research. Illustrated by charts & diagrams, this is useful as an up-to-date textbook for psychology classes, but is still eminently readable for the lay person. Social & political implications of identified differences are discussed. This book will be of value not only to psychologists, marriage counselors & medical practitioners, but also to all interested in the feminist movement, affirmative action questions, sex relations, family behavior & the sociology of the family. Order from Scott-Townsend Publishers, Box 34070 N.W., Washington, D.C. 20043 or by telephone to (202) 371-2700 or FAX (202) 371-1523.

Why Believe in Male Female Differences

Differences between males and females has been an intellectual point of contention and misunderstanding for decades.

Why Believe in Male Female Differences

Differences between males and females has been an intellectual point of contention and misunderstanding for decades. The confusion has been fueled by debates in the academic community. Agreement or consensus has not come forth. This little easy to read book presents compelling reasons why it is better to believe that there are meaningful male female differences and understanding these differences will benefit both men and women.

Male Female

Now in a third edition, the authoritative classic text Male, Female evaluates both foundational and recent scholarship on the evolution of human sex differences, including how males and females differ in modern contexts.

Male  Female

"The questions of how and to what extent the sexes differ are long standing and controversial. In this authoritative classic, David C. Geary provides a comprehensive evaluation of these questions based on the principles of evolution, particularly sexual selection. Using an evolutionary framework, Geary describes how human sex differences are similar to those found in other species and how the expression of these differences is uniquely human. The principles of sexual selection such as female choice and male-male competition explain sex differences in parenting, mate choices, ways of competing for mates, social-political preferences, development, and brain and cognition. Far from being one-sided in the nature-versus-nurture debate, an evolutionary framework can easily incorporate the influence of experience and cultural context on the development and expression of sex differences. Thoroughly updated and expanded, this third edition includes a chapter on sex differences that emerge in modern contexts, such as differences in occupational choices and variation in sexual orientation, gender identity, and relationships. Scholars from a wide range of sciences have much to learn from this monumental volume"--

Male female Differences

Male female Differences


Gender and Personality

Gender and Personality


Gender Gap

Gender Gap


The Essential Difference

Does it really all just come down to our upbringing? In The Essential Difference, leading psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen confirms what most of us had suspected all along: that male and female brains are different.

The Essential Difference

We all know the opposite sex can be a baffling, even infuriating, species. Why do most men use the phone to exchange information rather than have a chat? Why do women love talking about relationships and feelings with their girlfriends while men seem drawn to computer games, new gadgets, or the latest sports scores? Does it really all just come down to our upbringing? In The Essential Difference, leading psychologist Simon Baron-Cohen confirms what most of us had suspected all along: that male and female brains are different. This groundbreaking and controversial study reveals the scientific evidence (present even in one-day-old babies) that proves that female-type brains are better at empathizing and communicating, while male brains are stronger at understanding and building systems-not just computers and machinery, but abstract systems such as politics and music. Most revolutionary of all, The Essential Difference also puts forward the compelling new theory that autism (and its close relative, Asperger's Syndrome) is actually an example of the extreme male brain. His theory can explain why those who live with this condition are brilliant at analyzing the most complex systems yet cannot relate to the emotional lives of those with whom they live. Understanding our essential difference, Baron-Cohen concludes, may help us not only make sense of our partners' foibles, but also solve one of the most mysterious scientific riddles of our time.

Male female Differences in Work Experience Occupation and Earnings

Table K. Proportion of Male - Female Earnings Differential Accounted for by Differences in the Mean Values of the Independent Variables ( Based on coefficients for males ) Not high school graduates High school graduates Characteristic ...

Male female Differences in Work Experience  Occupation  and Earnings


Male female Differences in Labor Market Outcomes During the Early Transition to Market

Taking the difference in wages between the male and female earnings functions in (1), one can obtain: (3) d, = (XMI - XF, )pMl + (0MI - 6FI )aMl , where ΘFt = (wFt - XF,PMt)/crMt. The numerator of 9Ft is the difference between the wage ...

Male female Differences in Labor Market Outcomes During the Early Transition to Market