Management of World Heritage Sites Cultural Landscapes and Sustainability

This book highlights the challenges and trends resulting from the relationship between tourist motivations, World Heritage Sites and local cultural uniqueness.

Management of World Heritage Sites  Cultural Landscapes and Sustainability

This book highlights the challenges and trends resulting from the relationship between tourist motivations, World Heritage Sites and local cultural uniqueness. With a special focus on Portugal and Brazil, several chapters refer to international cultural heritage experiences and destinations in Belgium, Cuba, Croatia, Italy, Japan, South Africa, Spain and Turkey. The volume shows that there is some crossover between tangible and intangible cultural heritage, and explores themes such as festivals and events, marketing, branding, sustainability, authenticity, preservation, wine tourism, ethnic tourism, religious tourism, literary tourism, museology and garden tourism. It will appeal to readers interested in tourism management, quality of the tourist offer, tourism heritage products, and characteristics of the tourism demand in the scope of cultural heritage.

Managing Cultural Landscapes

One of our deepest needs is for a sense of identity and belonging. A common feature in this is human attachment to landscape and how we find identity in landscape and place.

Managing Cultural Landscapes

One of our deepest needs is for a sense of identity and belonging. A common feature in this is human attachment to landscape and how we find identity in landscape and place. The late 1980s and early 1990s saw a remarkable flowering of interest in, and understanding of, cultural landscapes. With these came a challenge to the 1960s and 1970s concept of heritage concentrating on great monuments and archaeological locations, famous architectural ensembles, or historic sites with connections to the rich and famous. Managing Cultural Landscapes explores the latest thought in landscape and place by: airing critical discussion of key issues in cultural landscapes through accessible accounts of how the concept of cultural landscape applies in diverse contexts across the globe and is inextricably tied to notions of living history where landscape itself is a rich social history record widening the notion that landscape only involves rural settings to embrace historic urban landscapes/townscapes examining critical issues of identity, maintenance of traditional skills and knowledge bases in the face of globalization, and new technologies fostering international debate with interdisciplinary appeal to provide a critical text for academics, students, practitioners, and informed community organizations discussing how the cultural landscape concept can be a useful management tool relative to current issues and challenges. With contributions from an international group of authors, Managing Cultural Landscapes provides an examination of the management of heritage values of cultural landscapes from Australia, Japan, China, USA, Canada, Thailand, Indonesia, Pacific Islands, India and the Philippines; it reviews critically the factors behind the removal of Dresden and its cultural landscape from World Heritage listing and gives an overview of Historic Urban Landscape thinking.

World Heritage Conservation

This book provides an overview of the convention through an interdisciplinary approach to conservation.

World Heritage Conservation

The UNESCO World Heritage Convention has become one of the most successful UN instruments for promoting cultural diplomacy and dialogue on conservation of cultural and natural heritage. This book provides an overview of the convention through an interdisciplinary approach to conservation. It shows that based on the notion of outstanding universal value and international cooperation for the protection of heritage, the convention provides a platform for sustainable development through the conservation and management of heritage of significance to humanity. With increasing globalization of heritage, World Heritage Conservation is reviewed as an emerging interdisciplinary field of study creating new opportunities for inclusive heritage debate both locally and globally, requiring common tools and understanding. With over a thousand properties inscribed on the World Heritage List, from biologically diverse sites such as the Central Amazon Conservation Complex to the urban landscape of the metropolis of Rio de Janeiro, the book will help students, researchers and professionals in the identification, protection, conservation and presentation of World Heritage. Targeted at a diversity of disciplines, the book critically describes the strategies for implementing the convention and the processes of heritage governance for sustainable development.

Cultural Landscapes of South Asia

This volume focuses on the notion of cultural landscape as a medium integrating multiple forms of heritage and points to a new paradigm for conservation practices in the South Asian context.

Cultural Landscapes of South Asia

Winner of the Environmental Design Research Association's 2018 Achievement Award The pluralism of South Asia belies any singular reading of its heritage. In spite of this diversity, its cultural traditions retain certain attributes that are at their core South Asian—in their capacity to self‐organize, enact and reinvent cultural memories, and in their ability to retain an intimate connection with nature and landscape. This volume focuses on the notion of cultural landscape as a medium integrating multiple forms of heritage and points to a new paradigm for conservation practices in the South Asian context. Even though the construct of cultural landscape has been accepted as a category of heritage, its potent use in heritage management in general and within the South Asian context in particular has not been widely studied. The volume challenges the prevalent views of heritage management in South Asia that are entrenched in colonial legacies and contemporary global policy frameworks.

Managing Cultural Heritage Sites in Southeastern Europe

The CHERPLAN project (CHERPLAN stands for “Enhancement of Cultural Heritage through Environmental Planning and Management") aims to provide a strong basis for ensuring compatibility and synergy between cultural heritage conservation and ...

Managing Cultural Heritage Sites in Southeastern Europe

The CHERPLAN project (CHERPLAN stands for “Enhancement of Cultural Heritage through Environmental Planning and Management") aims to provide a strong basis for ensuring compatibility and synergy between cultural heritage conservation and socioeconomic growth by fostering the adoption of a modern environmental planning approach throughout southeast Europe (SEE). The aim of environmental planning is to integrate traditional urban/spatial planning with the concerns of environmentalism to ensure sustainable development; when innovatively applied to cultural heritage sites, environmental planning’s comprehensive perspective can be regarded as composed of three spheres: the built and historical environment, the socioeconomic and cultural environment, and the biophysical environment. In this regard, this publication, as one of the results of the CHERPLAN project, addresses vital parts of cultural heritage management. It provides the basic framework defined by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), and guidelines for twenty specific management issues composed of a thematic introduction, recommendations, and good-practice examples. Thus, the publication provides practical information on the application of environmental planning in SEE, some of it developed within CHERPLAN pilot projects and some of it defined through the experiences of other cultural heritage sites. In both cases, recommendations and good-practice examples present local traditional knowledge and experience that has been developed through successful management practices in the past. The publication aims to assist cultural heritage site managers in their everyday decisions by supporting them with firm technical knowledge and specific instructions on how to react in a given situation. In this regard, it could support the recently issued World Heritage Resource Manual on Managing Cultural World Heritage, which was published by UNESCO in November 2013. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Knjiga Upravljanje območij s kulturno dediščino v Jugovzhodni Evropi, kot eden od rezultatov projekta CHERPLAN, naslavlja ključna vprašanja upravljanja območij s kulturno dediščino. Predstavlja osnovni okvir, ki sta ga na tem področju izoblikovala Unesco in ICOMOS, ter usmeritve za dvajset različnih izzivov upravljanja, kjer vsakega pospremimo z uvodom, priporočili in primeri dobrih praks. Knjiga tako zagotavlja praktične informacije za uveljavljanje okoljskega planiranja na območjih s kulturno dediščino v Jugovzhodni Evropi, pri čemer je bil del priporočil pripravljen znotraj pilotnih območij, del pa smo jih prevzeli od drugje. V obeh primerih predstavljajo priporočila in dobre prakse preverjena lokalna znanja, saj so jih v opisanih primerih uspešno uporabili. Projekt CHERPLAN – Krepitev kulturne dediščine z okoljskim načrtovanjem in upravljanjem – je bil namenjen zagotavljanju sinergij med ohranjanjem kulturne dediščine in družbenoekonomskim razvojem, s posebnim poudarkom na razvoju in uporabi okolju prijaznih skupnih pristopov in novih tehnik v načrtovanju in upravljanju območij s kulturno dediščino v Jugovzhodni Evropi. Običajno se na tovrstnih območjih pojavlja navzkrižje interesov med sistemom zaščite kulturne dediščine, ki lokalnemu okolju postavlja določene omejitve, ter potrebo lokalnega okolja po razvoju in modernizaciji. Namen projekta je bil tako tradicionalne načine planiranja nadgraditi z okoljskimi elementi ter na ta način zagotavljati celostno načrtovanje območij s kulturno dediščino. Knjiga je namenjena upravljavcem območij s kulturno dediščino in naj bi jim pomagala pri vsakodnevnih odločitvah s tehničnim znanjem in praktičnimi nasveti, kako se odzvati v konkretni situaciji. Tako lahko knjiga dopolnjuje leta 2013 izdani priročnik Unesca o upravljanju območij s kulturno dediščino (World Heritage Resource Manual on Managing Cultural World Heritage).

World Heritage Sites

This book reviews the important interrelations between the industry, local communities and conservation work, bringing together the various opportunities and challenges for a destination.

World Heritage Sites

Heritage is a growing area of both tourism and study, with World Heritage Site designations increasing year-on-year. This book reviews the important interrelations between the industry, local communities and conservation work, bringing together the various opportunities and challenges for different destinations. World Heritage status is a strong marketing brand, and proper heritage management and effective conservation are vital, but this tourism must also be developed and managed appropriately if it is to benefit a site. As many sites are located in residential areas, their interaction with the local community must also be carefully considered. This book: - Reviews new areas of development such as Historic Urban Landscapes, Intangible Cultural Heritage, Memory of the World and Global Geoparks. - Includes global case studies to relate theory to practice. - Covers a worldwide industry of over 1,000 cultural and natural heritage sites. An important read for academics, researchers and students of heritage studies, cultural studies and tourism, this book is also a useful resource for professionals working in conservation, cultural and natural heritage management.

Cultural Landscapes of Universal Value

This important step has led to enhanced international and national recognition. The present volume aims to contribute to enhanced protection and management of cultural landscapes around the world.

Cultural Landscapes of Universal Value

Cultural landscapes are at the interface between nature and culture. They represent the permanent interaction between humans and their environment, shaping the surface of the earth. With the rapid social and economic development cultural landscapes belong to the most fragile and threatened sites on earth. Adapted protection and proper management is urgently needed. Since 1992 outstanding cultural landscapes can be protected under the World Heritage Convention. Thus, the World Heritage Convention is the first international legal instrument recognizing and safeguarding this type of property for future generations. This important step has led to enhanced international and national recognition. The present volume aims to contribute to enhanced protection and management of cultural landscapes around the world. It furthermore highlights in a truly interdisciplinary approach some of the most outstanding cultural landscapes of universal value in their geocultural and environmental context.

World Heritage Sites and Tourism

This volume, drawing upon a wide range of international cases relating to some 33 World Heritage Sites, reveals the multiple dimensions of the relations that exist between the sites and local communities.

World Heritage Sites and Tourism

Not all World Heritage Sites have people living within or close by their boundaries, but many do. The designation of World Heritage status brings a new dimension to the functioning of local communities and particularly through tourism. Too many tourists accentuated by the World Heritage label, or in some cases not enough tourists, despite anticipation of increased numbers, can act to disrupt and disturb relations within a community and between communities. Either way, tourism can be seen as a form of activity that can generate interest and concern as it is played out within World Heritage Sites. But the relationships that World Heritage Sites and their consequent tourism share with communities are not just a function of the number of tourists. The relationships are complex and ever changing as the communities themselves change and are built upon long-standing and wider contextual factors that stretch beyond tourism. This volume, drawing upon a wide range of international cases relating to some 33 World Heritage Sites, reveals the multiple dimensions of the relations that exist between the sites and local communities. The designation of the sites can create, obscure and heighten the power relations between different parts of a community, between different communities and between the tourism and the heritage sector. Increasingly, the management of World Heritage is not only about the management of buildings and landscapes but about managing the communities that live and work in or near them.

World Heritage and Sustainable Development

This book is key reading for all heritage professionals interested in developing a better understanding of the new Sustainable Development policy. It is also essential reading for scholars and students working in the area.

World Heritage and Sustainable Development

In 2015, the General Assembly of State Parties to the World Heritage Convention passed a ground-breaking Sustainable Development policy that seeks to bring the World Heritage system into line with the UN’s sustainable development agenda (UNESCO 2015). World Heritage and Sustainable Development provides a broad overview of the process that brought about the new policy and the implications of its enactment. The book is divided into four parts. Part I puts the policy in its historical and theoretical context, and Part II offers an analysis of the four policy dimensions on which the policy is based – environmental sustainability, inclusive social development, inclusive economic development and the fostering of peace and security. Part III presents perspectives from IUCN, ICOMOS and ICCROM – the three Advisory Bodies to the World Heritage Committee, and Part IV offers ‘case study’ perspectives on the practical implications of the policy. Contributions come from a wide range of experienced heritage professionals and practitioners who offer both ‘inside’ perspectives on the evolution of the policy and ‘outside’ perspectives on its implications. Combined, they present and analyse the main ideas, debates and implications of the policy change. This book is key reading for all heritage professionals interested in developing a better understanding of the new Sustainable Development policy. It is also essential reading for scholars and students working in the area.

Perceptions of Sustainability in Heritage Studies

Mit Beiträgen von Francesco Bandarin, Minja Yang und Mechthild Rössler Die Welt im 21.

Perceptions of Sustainability in Heritage Studies

With contribiutions Francesco Bandarin, Minja Yang and Mechthild Rössler This publication is the fourth in the Heritage Studies series and aims to reflect upon the many dimensions of sustainability and sustainable development within the Heritage Studies discourse. Sustainability as a concept and sustainable development as a goal are presented in official policies within UNESCO's understanding of heritage, in its paradigmatic reflections and in the diversity of theories and methods, including many different and sometimes conflicting understandings of sustainability within this discourse. Thus, the contributors to this publication discuss sustainability as it directly concerns the potential of different approaches to World Heritage and Intangible Heritage. The inclusion of the four dimensions of sustainability - environmental, economic, social and cultural - into the Heritage Studies discourse opens a new perspective on the discourse itself.

Going Beyond

This volume looks at sustainable protection and sustainable use of cultural and natural heritage, particularly in view of the current challenges of the 21st century.

Going Beyond

This volume looks at sustainable protection and sustainable use of cultural and natural heritage, particularly in view of the current challenges of the 21st century. For more than 40 years the World Heritage Convention has regulated the protection of the cultural and natural heritage of humankind, particularly in that heritage shall be protected if it is threatened by modern development. The international community has also adopted sustainability and sustainable development, as objectives to facilitate the protection of cultural and natural heritage. Sustainable heritage protection and use must therefore be preserved in the face of the global challenges it faces and must be perceived in terms of societal, political and corresponding economic paradigms.

The Protected Landscape Approach

The traditional patterns of land use that have created many of the world's cultural landscapes contribute to biodiversity, support ecological processes, provide important environmental services, and have proven sustainable over the ...

The Protected Landscape Approach

The traditional patterns of land use that have created many of the world's cultural landscapes contribute to biodiversity, support ecological processes, provide important environmental services, and have proven sustainable over the centuries. Protected landscapes can serve as living models of sustainable use of land and resources, and offer important lessons for sustainable development. Examples of these landscapes and the diverse strategies needed to maintain this essential relationship between people and the land are provided.

Managing World Heritage Sites

This text considers all of these aspects in arriving at solutions for site management principles. In 12 chapters and 5 case studies it covers issues such as WHS designation, marketing, visitor management, revenue generation and management.

Managing World Heritage Sites

World Heritage Sites are some of the most recognised locations around the world. They include natural sites such as the Grand Canyon and the Great Barrier and cultural ones such as the Pyramids at Giza, the Walled City of Baku in Azerbaijan and the Historic Centre of Riga in Latvia. The responsibility to manage them successfully and ensure that the resources are not damaged by visitors, war or environment is therefore vital. Managing World Heritage Sites covers the management issues encountered at cultural and natural UNESCO World Heritage Sites). WHS sites are high profile and as their designation states they are unique. They are often government owned and subject to political debate, they have iconic status and are therefore crucial to national tourism industries, and often involve a large number of stakeholders within their management structures. This text considers all of these aspects in arriving at solutions for site management principles. In 12 chapters and 5 case studies it covers issues such as WHS designation, marketing, visitor management, revenue generation and management. Each chapter will examine the management issues associated with managing heritage within the WH Sites, making clear use of management practices to apply the theory. Managing World Heritage Sites: • Includes international case studies such as World Heritage Sites in the Americas, Machupicchu, Stonehenge, Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves of Australia, Megalithic Temples of Malta.• Is authored by an international contributor team of well known and respected experts in this field • Has a user friendly and logical structure including aims, introduction, case study, conclusion, references and websites and examples best practice. • 5 specific case study chapters including a location map, an explanation of key issues, conclusion, and questions for self-study

Landscapes for the World

This book provides an accessible introduction to these globally significant landscapes. Peter Fowler asks why these places matter to all of us.

Landscapes for the World

The best of the world's cultural landscapes - the results of humanity's interaction with the environment over millennia - are a legacy of enormous importance, comparable with great archaeological monuments and works of art. Since 1992 the international community has begun to define, identify, designate and protect these special places, through UNESCO's World Heritage Programme, which now inscribes World Heritage landscapes as well as World Heritage sites. This book provides an accessible introduction to these globally significant landscapes. Peter Fowler asks why these places matter to all of us. In this book he explores the ideas, iconography and values which have inspired the UNESCO programme; visits all of the 38 landscapes designated in the period 1992-2003: places such as the Tongariro volcano in New Zealand, the Portuguese port wine region of Alto Douro and the rice-growing Cordilleras in the Philippines; explores the complex politics involved in designation; places Britain's landscape heritage in its global context. Two World Heritage landscapes have been designated so far in Britain - Blaenavon and Kew Gardens. St Kilda and the Lake District are under consideration; and provides, with its discussion of landscape management issues, an essential text for heritage and nature conservation practitioners and students. This is a book which emphasises the universality of cultural landscapes. They reflect the myriad lifeways of humanity across the globe and through time, and the best of them are all equally worthy of conservation. Peter Fowler is now a consultant, writer and painter, based in London and Languedoc. He was formerly Secretary to the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England), and Professor of Archaeology at Newcastle University. He has been closely involved with the selection of landscapes appropriate for World Heritage inscription.

African Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management

This book seeks to place African cultural heritage studies and conservation practices within an international and modern world discourse of conservation by presenting its varied themes and topics that are important for the development of ...

African Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management

For a long time, resource conservationists have viewed environmental conservation as synonymous with wilderness and wildlife resources only, oblivious to the contributions made by cultural and heritage resources. However, cultural heritage resources in many parts of the developing world are gradually becoming key in social (e.g. communities’ identities and museums), economic (heritage tourism and eco-tourism), educational (curriculum development), civic (intergenerational awareness), and international resources management (e.g. UNESCO). In universities, African cultural heritage resources are facing a challenge of being brought into various academic discourses and syllabi in a rather reactive and/or haphazard approach, resulting in failure to fully address and research these resources’ conservation needs to ensure that their use in multiple platforms and by various stakeholders is sustainable. This book seeks to place African cultural heritage studies and conservation practices within an international and modern world discourse of conservation by presenting its varied themes and topics that are important for the development of the wider field of cultural heritage studies and management.

World Heritage Sites

The Decree of IPHAN No 127 of 30 April 2009 – established the designation of Brazilian Cultural Landscapes and a ... sustainable use of the environment, landscape, and natural, cultural, historical, and archaeological heritage in the ...

World Heritage Sites

A World Heritage Site is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. The main objectives were to define the World Heritage in both cultural and natural aspects; to enlist Sites and Monuments from the member countries which are of exceptional interest and universal value, the protection of which is the concern of all mankind; and to promote co-operation among all Nations and people to contribute for the protection of these universal treasures intact for future generations. This beautiful book shows off these sites, providing a brief text, and photographs for each. It is a stunning indication of the longevity and durability, culture, and spirit.

Conserving Cultural Landscapes

Table 2.1 Cultural landscapes and mixed sites Cultural Type of site Cultural site Landscape Mixed site Natural site ... in 2012: World Heritage and Sustainable Development: The Role of Local Communities.9 Traditional management and ...

Conserving Cultural Landscapes

New approaches to both cultural landscapes and historic urban landscapes increasingly recognize the need to guide future change, rather than simply protecting the fabric of the past. Challenging traditional notions of historic preservation, Conserving Cultural Landscapes takes a dynamic multifaceted approach to conservation. It builds on the premise that a successful approach to urban and cultural landscape conservation recognizes cultural as well as natural values, sustains traditional connections to place, and engages people in stewardship where they live and work. It brings together academics within the humanities and humanistic social sciences, conservation and preservation professionals, practitioners, and stakeholders to rethink the meaning and practice of cultural heritage conservation, encourage international cooperation, and stimulate collaborative research and scholarship.

Landscape and Sustainability

Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) (1998) UNESCO World Heritage Sites – A Consultation Paper on a New United ... in A. Phillips Management Guidelines for IUCN Category V Protected Areas: Protected Landscapes/ Seascapes ...

Landscape and Sustainability

This unique book addresses the issue of sustainability from the point of view of landscape architecture, dealing with professional practices of planners, designers and landscape managers. This second edition contains updated and new material reflecting developments during the last five years and comprehensively addresses the relationship between landscape architecture and sustainability. Much in the text is underpinned by landscape ecology, in contrast to the idea of landscape as only appealing to the eye or aspiring cerebrally to be fine art. Landscape and Sustainability establishes that the sustainability agenda needs a new mindset among professionals: the driving question must always be ‘is it sustainable?’ Developing theory into practice, from the global to the local scale and from issues of policy and planning through to detailed design and implementation and on to long-term maintenance and management, the contributors raise and re-examine a complex array of research, policy and professional issues and agendas to contribute to the necessary ongoing debate about the future of both landscape and sustainability.