Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script

Illustrated with 133 maps, Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script by David Holm, surveys the traditional character script of the Zhuang and related peoples in southern China and northern Vietnam, and discusses regional variation in ...

Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script

Illustrated with 133 maps, Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script by David Holm, surveys the traditional character script of the Zhuang and related peoples in southern China and northern Vietnam, and discusses regional variation in relation to dialect, native chieftaincies, ritual masters, migration, and military garrisons.

Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script

in the Ancient Chu Dialect]. Zhongguo yawén PF' 331 4, 378-381. Zheng Yl'qing 55%? (1988). ']ingxi fangkuai Zhuangzi shlxi' fififijiiégaiigzttfi [A Tentative Analysis of the Zhuang Square Character Script in ]ingxi].

Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script

Illustrated with 133 maps, Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script by David Holm, surveys the traditional character script of the Zhuang and related peoples in southern China and northern Vietnam, and discusses regional variation in relation to dialect, native chieftaincies, ritual masters, migration, and military garrisons.

Sinography The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script

“A typology of readings of Chinese characters in traditional Zhuang manuscripts.” Cahiers de Linguistique – Asie Orientale 38 (2): 245–292. Holm, David. 2013. Mapping the Old Zhuang character script: A vernacular writing system from ...

Sinography  The Borrowing and Adaptation of the Chinese Script

In Sinography, Zev Handel provides a comprehensive comparative analysis of the ways in which the Chinese-character script evolved as it was adapted to write other languages of Asia, including Korean, Vietnamese, Japanese, Zhuang, Khitan, and Jurchen.

The Brigands Song Serving in the Army of A Native Chieftain

If we compare the script here with the forty-five texts and locations surveyedin MappingtheOldZhuangCharacterScript ... something discussed in the Conclusion to Mapping the Old Zhuang Script.181 Among the forty-five locations surveyed, ...

The Brigands  Song  Serving in the Army of A Native Chieftain

The Brigands’ Song is a unique testimony to the experiences of ordinary men – and women – during wartime in pre-modern China.

Hanvueng The Goose King and the Ancestral King

In this text, there is a also much smaller layer of readings which date back to the period of Old Chinese or correspond to Old Chinese ... 90 See Holm, Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script, passim. For an annotated edition of a text ...

Hanvueng  The Goose King and the Ancestral King

The Hanvueng epic, a narrative of enmity between two royal step-brothers, is a ritual text recited when there is fraternal feuding, death by violence, outbreaks of smallpox, or other such disasters. The theme is one that resonates deeply in the Tai societies on the periphery of the Chinese empire.

Language Standardization and Language Variation in Multilingual Contexts

Holm, D. (2008) The old Zhuang script. In A. Diller, J. Edmondson and Y. Luo (eds) The Tai-Kadai Languages (pp. 415–428). London: Routledge. Holm, D. (2013) Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular Writing System from ...

Language Standardization and Language Variation in Multilingual Contexts

This important contribution to the sociolinguistics of Asian languages breaks new ground in the study of language standards and standardization in two key ways: in its focus on Asia, with particular attention paid to China and its neighbours, and in the attention paid to multilingual contexts. The chapters address various kinds of (sometimes hidden) multilingualism and examine the interactions between multilingualism and language standardization, offering a corrective to earlier work on standardization, which has tended to assume a monolingual nation state and monolingual individuals. Taken together, the chapters in this book thus add to our understanding of the ways in which multilingualism is implicated in language standardization, as well as the impact of language standards on multilingualism.

Chinese Linguistics

'The Old Zhuang Script', in A. V.N. Diller, J.A. Edmondson and Y. Luo (eds.), The Tai-Kadai Languages. London: Routledge, 415–28. Holm, David (2013). Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular Writing System from Southern ...

Chinese Linguistics

This volume provides a broad introduction to Chinese linguistics. It offers an accessible synthesis of the most relevant topics in the field both for researchers and scholars on China studies and for linguists, including those with little or no previous knowledge of Chinese.

Languages scripts and Chinese texts in East Asia

Mapping the old Zhuang character script: a vernacular writing system from southern China (Leiden: Brill). Hong Sönp'yo 2006. Myöng Ch'ongdae sūhaksö iii sihak chisik kwa Choson hugi hoehwaron iii pyöndong, in Hong Sönp'yo et al., eds, ...

Languages  scripts  and Chinese texts in East Asia

Chinese Writing and the Rise of the Vernacular in East Asia is a wide-ranging study of vernacularization in East Asia - not only China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam, but also societies that no longer exist, such as the Tangut and Khitan empires. Peter Kornicki takes the reader from the early centuries of the common era, when the Chinese script was the only form of writing and Chinese Buddhist, Confucian, and medical texts spread throughout East Asia, through the centuries when vernacular scripts evolved, right up to the end of the nineteenth century when nationalism created new roles for vernacular languages and vernacular scripts. Through an examination of oral approaches to Chinese texts, it shows how highly-valued Chinese texts came to be read through the prism of the vernaculars and ultimately to be translated. This long process has some parallels with vernacularization in Europe, but a crucial difference is that literary Chinese was, unlike Latin, not a spoken language. As a consequence, people who spoke different East Asian vernaculars had no means of communicating in speech, but they could communicate silently by means of written conversation in literary Chinese; a further consequence is that within each society Chinese texts assumed vernacular garb: in classes and lectures, Chinese texts were read and declaimed in the vernaculars. What happened in the nineteenth century and why are there still so many different scripts in East Asia? How and why were Chinese texts dethroned, and what replaced them? These are some of the questions addressed in Chinese Writing and the Rise of the Vernacular in East Asia.

Heritage and Religion in East Asia

Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular Writing System from Southern China. Leiden: Brill, Handbuch der Orientalistik series. Holm, David. 2019. “Literate Shamanism: The Priests called Then among the Tày in Guangxi and ...

Heritage and Religion in East Asia

Heritage and Religion in East Asia examines how religious heritage, in a mobile way, plays across national boundaries in East Asia and, in doing so, the book provides new theoretical insights into the articulation of heritage and religion. Drawing on primary, comparative research carried out in four East Asian countries, much of which was undertaken by East Asian scholars, the book shows how the inscription of religious items as "Heritage" has stimulated cross-border interactions among religious practitioners and boosted tourism along modern pilgrimage routes. Considering how these forces encourage cross-border links in heritage practices and religious movements in China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan, the volume also questions what role heritage plays in a region where Buddhism, Taoism, and other various folk religious practices are dominant. Arguing that it is diversity and vibrancy that makes religious discourse in East Asia unique, the contributors explore how this particularity both energizes and is empowered by heritage practices in East Asia. Heritage and Religion in East Asia enriches understanding of the impact of heritage and religious culture in modern society and will be of interest to academics and students working in heritage studies, anthropology, religion, and East Asian studies.

Letters Without Capitals Text and Practice in Kim Mun Yao Culture

“Some Variant Characters in a Traditional Zhuang Manuscript: A New Angle on the Chinese Script.” Bulletin of the Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities. 78: 125–172. Holm, David. 2013. Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular ...

Letters Without Capitals  Text and Practice in Kim Mun  Yao  Culture

In Letters without Capitals: Texts and Practices in Kim Mun (Yao) Culture, Jacob Cawthorne demonstrates how the Chinese script is not only central to Kim Mun (Yao) cultural and religious practices, but also that it is an active vehicle for Kim Mun self-expression and community representation.

Physiognomy in Ming China Fortune and the Body

Unlike its counterpart, the physiognomy of things, which can be traced back to earlier traditions, character physiognomy did not appear as an independent category in the ... 109 See David Holm, Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script ...

Physiognomy in Ming China  Fortune and the Body

In Physiognomy in Ming China: Fortune and the Body, Xing Wang provides an extensive reading of the Ming (1368-1644 C. E.) texts of a well-known body divination technique ‘xiangshu’ (physiognomy), and investigates its unique ‘somatic cosmology’ in Ming religious and intellectual context.

The Languages and Linguistics of Mainland Southeast Asia

Mapping the Old Zhuang character script. A vernacular writing system from southern China. Leiden & Boston: Brill. Honts, Mary. 1979. Cases and clauses in Lao. Southeast Asian Linguistics Studies No. 4, 17–37.

The Languages and Linguistics of Mainland Southeast Asia

The handbook will offer a survey of the field of linguistics in the early 21st century for the Southeast Asian Linguistic Area. The last half century has seen a great increase in work on language contact, work in genetic, theoretical, and descriptive linguistics, and since the 1990s especially documentation of endangered languages. The book will provide an account of work in these areas, focusing on the achievements of SEAsian linguistics, as well as the challenges and unresolved issues, and provide a survey of the relevant major publications and other available resources. We will address: Survey of the languages of the area, organized along genetic lines, with discussion of relevant political and cultural background issues Theoretical/descriptive and typological issues Genetic classification and historical linguistics Areal and contact linguistics Other areas of interest such as sociolinguistics, semantics, writing systems, etc. Resources (major monographs and monograph series, dictionaries, journals, electronic data bases, etc.) Grammar sketches of languages representative of the genetic and structural diversity of the region.

Translation re Creation

“Oral Traditional Aesthetics and Old English Poetry”. In Medialität und mittelalterliche insulare Literatur, edited by Hildegard L.C. ... Kunming: Yunnan minzu chubanshe. Holm, David. 2013. Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A.

Translation re Creation

This book is a historical study of European-language translations of Naxi ritual manuscripts, the ritual literature of a small ethnic group living in southwest China’s Yunnan Province. The author discusses the translations into European languages (in English, French and German) from the late 19th century to the second half of the twentieth century, revealing a history of fragmentary yet interconnected translation efforts in the West. By exploring this network, he shows how translation can be understood as a metonymic “recreation” of textual worlds. As Naxi manuscripts are semi-oral texts representing an oral-formulaic tradition, their translation involves a metonymic relay of partial incorporations from manuscript/image to reading/spoken language. Therefore, the book engages in a series of textual excavations to uncover the previously occluded contemporaneous readings that would have led to the translations we can consult today, particularly in an attempt to understand how the Naxi literature has become part of Ezra Pound’s Cantos. Scholars in the field of ethnic minority literature in China and translation studies will find this book beneficial, and it will make new contributions to comparative literature between the East and West.

The Sino Tibetan Languages

Holm, David (2013) Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular Writing System from Southern China, Leiden: Brill. Karlgren, Bernard (1957) Grammata Serica Recensa, Bulletin 29. Stockholm Museum of Far Eastern Antiquities.

The Sino Tibetan Languages

There are more native speakers of Sino-Tibetan languages than of any other language family in the world. Our records of these languages are among the oldest for any human language, and the amount of active research on them has multiplied in the last few decades. Now in its second edition and fully updated to include new research, The Sino-Tibetan Languages includes overview articles on individual languages, with an emphasis on the less commonly described languages, as well as descriptions and comments on the subgroups in which they occur. There are overviews of the whole family on genetic classification and language contact, syntax and morphology, and also on word order typology. There are also more detailed overview articles on the phonology, morphosyntax, and writing system of just the Sinitic side of the family. Supplementing these overviews are articles on Shanghainese, Cantonese and Mandarin dialects. Tibeto-Burman is reviewed by genetic or geographical sub-group, with overview articles on some of the major groups and areas, and there are also detailed descriptions of 41 individual Tibeto-Burman languages, written by world experts in the field. Designed for students and researchers of Asian languages, The Sino-Tibetan Languages is a detailed overview of the field. This book is invaluable to language students, experts requiring concise, but thorough, information on related languages, and researchers working in historical, typological and comparative linguistics.

Language Power and Hierarchy

... Mapping the Old Zhuang Character Script: A Vernacular Writing System from Southern China. Leiden: Brill. Hu, A. and Hu, L. (2011), 'Dierdai Minzu Zhengce: Cuijin Minzu Jiaorong Yiti He Fanrong' ['Second generation Minzu policies: ...

Language Power and Hierarchy

Shunning polemicism and fashioning a new agenda for a critically informed yet practically orientated approach, this book explores aspects of multilingual education in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Amongst other issues, it also looks at the challenges associated with bilingual and trilingual education in Xinjiang and Tibet as well as the mediation between religion and culture in multi-ethnic schools, covering these issues from a range of perspectives - Korean, Uyghur, Tibetan, Mongolian and Yi. The PRC promotes itself as a harmonious, stable multicultural mosaic, with over 50 distinct ethnic groups striving for common prosperity. Beneath this rhetoric, there is also inter-ethnic discord, with scenes of ethnic violence in Lhasa and Urumqi over the last few years. China has a complex system of multilingual education - with dual-pathway curricula, bilingual and trilingual instruction, specialised ethnic schools. This education system is a lynchpin in the Communist party state's efforts to keep a lid on simmering tensions and transform a rhetoric of harmony into a critical pluralistic harmonious multiculturalism. This book examines this supposed lynchpin.

Language Rights in a Changing China

A National Overview and Zhuang Case Study Alexandra Grey. Guo, Rongxin. 2013. ... Sawloih cuengh gun 壮汉词汇[Zhuang Han dictionary]. ... Mapping the old Zhuang character script: A vernacular writing system from southern China.

Language Rights in a Changing China

China has had constitutional minority language rights for decades, but what do they mean today? Answering with nuance and empirical detail, this book examines the rights through a sociolinguistic study of Zhuang, the language of China’s largest minority group. The analysis traces language policy from the Constitution to local government practices, investigating how Zhuang language rights are experienced as opening or restricting socioeconomic opportunity. The study finds that language rights do not challenge ascendant marketised and mobility-focused language ideologies which ascribe low value to Zhuang. However, people still value a Zhuang identity validated by government policy and practice. Rooted in a Bourdieusian approach to language, power and legal discourse, this is the first major publication to integrate contemporary debates in linguistics about mobility, capitalism and globalization into a study of China’s language policy. The book refines Grey’s award-winning doctoral dissertation, which received the Joshua A. Fishman Award in 2018. The judges said the study “decenter[s] all types of sociolinguistic assumptions." It is a thought-provoking work on minority rights and language politics, relevant beyond China.

Hua i Hs eh Chih

... it is quite unusual for two Chinese characters to be used in this way to represent a single syllable in Zhuang , though this is common enough in the vernacular scripts of Kam and Hmong in Guizhou , and occasionally found in the Old ...

Hua i Hs  eh Chih

Contains bibliographies and book reviews.

Language Education in China Policy and Experience from 1949

The effects of political changes, language backgrounds and various motivations for learning, at both the national and individual levels, are vividly presented in this composite story of China and learners in China.

Language Education in China   Policy and Experience from 1949

Language Education in China: Policy and Experience from 1949 is unprecedented as a comprehensive study of the multilingual circumstances in China. It tracks policy changes in the learning of Chinese, foreign languages and minority ethnic languages in China since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. On the basis of survey and interview data, the experiences of different age cohorts of learners are presented as "windows" to the realities of language education policy implementation over the last half century. The effects of political changes, language backgrounds and various motivations for learning, at both the national and individual levels, are vividly presented in this composite story of China and learners in China.

Form Macht Differenz

Form  Macht  Differenz


Historical Dictionary of the Peoples of the Southeast Asian Massif

Historical Dictionary of the Peoples of the Southeast Asian Massif offers hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on approximately 200 groups; the six countries where they reside, their leaders, and their political, economic, social ...

Historical Dictionary of the Peoples of the Southeast Asian Massif

Dwelling in the highlands of Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma (Myanmar), and southwest China are hundreds of ethnic groups. Some tribes number barely more than one hundred, others millions. Combined, their population tallies 80 million more than any of the countries (with the exception of China) they inhabit, yet in each region they are designated and treated as "minorities." Forced into the highlands while their enemies occupy the more fertile lowlands, this relegation, coupled with the fact that they are little known abroad and at home, has jeopardized their way of life and cultural distinctions. Historical Dictionary of the Peoples of the Southeast Asian Massif offers hundreds of cross-referenced dictionary entries on approximately 200 groups; the six countries where they reside, their leaders, and their political, economic, social, cultural, and religious traits. The chronology identifies important events, and the introduction examines both the diversities and similarities of the groups' ethnicities, languages, religious practices, and customs. The bibliography provides resources for further reading.