New Essays on Maria Edgeworth

Chapter 4 Maria Edgeworth and the ' True Use of Books ' for Eighteenth - Century Girls Kathleen B. Grathwol In the beginning of the eighteenth - century , Lady Mary Wortley Montagu famously summarized Lord Lyttleton's ' Advice to a Lady ...

New Essays on Maria Edgeworth

Devoted to the varied writings of the influential novelist, children's author, and educator, this collection combines postcolonial, historical, and gender criticism to offer fresh readings of Edgeworth's novels, stories, letters, and educational texts. The collection will be invaluable to established scholars working in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century literature, women's studies, and children's literature, as well as to students encountering Edgeworth for the first time.

Maria Edgeworth s Art of prose fiction

Butler, Harold Edgeworth and Harriet Jessie Butler, The Black Book of Edgeworthstown, 1585-1817 (London, Faber & Gwyer, 1927). Butler, Harold Edgeworth, “Sir Walter Scott and Maria Edgeworth. Some Unpublished Letters”, Modern Language ...

Maria Edgeworth s Art of prose fiction


Maria Edgeworth and Abolition

Britton, Jeanne “Theorizing Character in Maria Edgeworth's Belinda,” Nineteenth-Century Literature 67, no. 4 (Spring 2013): 433–56. Butler, Marilyn Maria Edgeworth: A Literary Biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1972.

Maria Edgeworth and Abolition

This Palgrave Pivot offers new readings of Maria Edgeworths representations of slavery. It shows how Edgeworth employed satiric technique and intertextual allusion to represent discourses of slavery and abolition as a litmus test of character one that she invites readers to use on themselves. Over the course of her career, Edgeworth repeatedly indicted hypocritical and hyperbolic misappropriation of the sentimental rhetoric that dominated the slavery debate. This book offers new readings of canonical Edgeworth texts as well as of largely neglected works, including: Whim for Whim, "The Good Aunt", Belinda, "The Grateful Negro", "The Two Guardians", and Harry and Lucy Continued. It also offers an unprecedented deep-dive into an important Romantic Era woman writers engagement with discourses of slavery and abolition. Robin Runia is Associate Professor of English at Xavier University of Louisiana, USA. She has published numerous articles and chapters exploring gender and race in the literature of the long eighteenth century.

The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part II

A memoir of Maria Edgeworth, with a selection from her letters, by the late Mrs Edgeworth; edited by her children. Not published. (London 1867) vol. 1, p. 73. Quoted in M. Pollard, 'Maria Edgeworth's The Parent's Assistant,' The Book ...

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part II

Presents scholars, students and general readers with the major fiction for adults, much of the best of juvenile fiction, and a selection of the educational and occasional writings of Maria Edgeworth.

Servants and Paternalism in the Works of Maria Edgeworth and Elizabeth Gaskell

Their careers are nearly contiguous; Gaskell published her first novel, Mary Barton (1848), one year before Edgeworth 's death.2 It appears that the two never met, though Edgeworth was a close friend of Gaskell's cousin, Henry Holland, ...

Servants and Paternalism in the Works of Maria Edgeworth and Elizabeth Gaskell

Writing during periods of dramatic social change, Maria Edgeworth and Elizabeth Gaskell were both attracted to the idea of radical societal transformation at the same time that their writings express nostalgia for a traditional, paternalistic ruling class. Julie Nash shows how this tension is played out especially through the characters of servants in short fiction and novels such as Edgeworth's Castle Rackrent, Belinda, and Helen and Gaskell's North and South and Cranford. Servant characters, Nash contends, enable these writers to give voice to the contradictions inherent in the popular paternalistic philosophy of their times because the situation of domestic servitude itself embodies such inconsistencies. Servants, whose labor was essential to the economic and social function of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British society, made up the largest category of workers in England by the nineteenth century and yet were expected to be socially invisible. At the same time, they lived in the same houses as their masters and mistresses and were privy to the most intimate details of their lives. Both Edgeworth and Gaskell created servant characters who challenge the social hierarchy, thus exposing the potential for dehumanization and corruption inherent in the paternalistic philosophy. Nash's study opens up important avenues for future scholars of women's fiction in the nineteenth century.

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth

Volume 2 Maria Edgeworth. Return to Edgeworthstown—Literary work and reading: Early Lessons, Harry and Lucy—Walter Scott and Joanna Baillie—Death of Lord Londonderry—Visit to Scotland—Edinburgh: Evening at Sir Walter Scott's—Sir Walter ...

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth

Reproduction of the original: The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth by Maria Edgeworth

The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part II Vol 12

30–2; Clíona Ó Gallchoir, 'Maria Edgeworth's Revolutionary Morality and the Limits of Realism' Colby Quarterly 2000 (36), 87–99. 32. Perera, p. 34. 33. For full bibliographical details of these and related editions, see B. C. Slade, ...

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part II Vol 12

Presents scholars, students and general readers with the major fiction for adults, much of the best of juvenile fiction, and a selection of the educational and occasional writings of Maria Edgeworth. MARIA EDGEWORTH was born in 1768. Her first novel, Castle Rackrent (1800) was also her first Irish tale. The next such tale was Ennui (1809), after which came The Absentee, which began life as an unstaged play and was then published (in prose) in Tales of Fashionable Life (1812), as were several of her other stories. They were followed in 1817 by the last of her Irish tales, Ormond. Maria Edgeworth died in 1849. Edited with an introduction and notes by Marilyn Butler.

Works of Maria Edgeworth

Maria Edgeworth. You might have exhibited him a captive in your chains- honourable he would have thought them , and so would any other man of taste and sense - but you preferred to the grati- fication of vanity the certainty of not ...

Works of Maria Edgeworth


The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part I Vol 8

Mrs Frances Edgeworth records Morellet's reciprocal admiration of Edgeworth: [Mr. E] has excellent spirits and has had the pleasure of seeing many people of literature and merit eager to be introduced to Maria whose name is as well ...

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part I Vol 8

This book shows how Maria Edgewoth drew on her knowledge of the life of writings of James Harrington in composing that tale. It serves to draw in a more local reference: Florence Court Demesne in County Fermanagh was built around 1750 and originally named for Florence Wrey, wife of Sir John Cole. MARIA EDGEWORTH was born in 1768. Her first novel, Castle Rackrent (1800) was also her first Irish tale. The next such tale was Ennui (1809), after which came The Absentee, which began life as an unstaged play and was then published (in prose) in Tales of Fashionable Life (1812), as were several of her other stories. They were followed in 1817 by the last of her Irish tales, Ormond. Maria Edgeworth died in 1849. Edited with an introduction and notes by Marilyn Butler.

The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part II Vol 10

Quoted in M. Pollard, 'Maria Edgeworth's The Parent's Assistant,' The Book Collector, vol. 20, no. 3 (Autumn 1971), pp. 347–51. See pp. 348–9. Evenings at Home; or, The Juvenile Budget Opened (London: Joseph Johnson, 1792–6) 6 vols., ...

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part II Vol 10

Presents scholars, students and general readers with the major fiction for adults, much of the best of juvenile fiction, and a selection of the educational and occasional writings of Maria Edgeworth. MARIA EDGEWORTH was born in 1768. Her first novel, Castle Rackrent (1800) was also her first Irish tale. The next such tale was Ennui (1809), after which came The Absentee, which began life as an unstaged play and was then published (in prose) in Tales of Fashionable Life (1812), as were several of her other stories. They were followed in 1817 by the last of her Irish tales, Ormond. Maria Edgeworth died in 1849. Edited with an introduction and notes by Marilyn Butler.

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth Complete

Maria Edgeworth Augustus J. C. Hare. that's not all, sir; one day, please your honour, I rode him out in a hurry to a fair, and he lay down with me in the ford, and I lost my fair." ***** For the last few years Mrs. Elizabeth ...

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth  Complete

In her later years Miss Edgeworth was often asked to write a biographical preface to her novels. She refused. "As a woman," she said, "my life, wholly domestic, can offer nothing of interest to the public." Incidents indeed, in that quiet happy home existence, there were none to narrate, nothing but the ordinary joys and sorrows which attend every human life. Yet the letters of one so clear-sighted and sagacious—one whom Macaulay considered to be the second woman of her age—are valuable, not only as a record of her times, and of many who were prominent figures in them: but from the picture they naturally give of a simple, honest, generous, high-minded character, filled from youth to age with love and goodwill to her fellow-creatures, and a desire for their highest good. An admirable collection of Miss Edgeworth's letters was printed after her death by her stepmOther and lifelong friend, but only for private circulation. As all her generation has long since passed away, Mr. Edgeworth of Edgeworthstown now permits that these letters should be read beyond the limits of the family circle. An editor has had little more to do than to make a selection, and to write such a thread of biography as might unite the links of the chain. AUGUSTUS J.C. HARE. In the flats of the featureless county of Longford stands the large and handsome but unpretentious house of Edgeworthstown. The scenery here has few natural attractions, but the loving care of several generations has gradually beautified the surroundings of the house, and few homes have been more valued or more the centre round which a large family circle has gathered in unusual sympathy and love. In his Memoirs, Mr. Edgeworth tells us how his family, which had given a name to Edgeworth, now Edgeware, near London, came to settle in Ireland more than three hundred years ago. Roger Edgeworth, a monk, having taken advantage of the religious changes under Henry VIII., had married and left two sons, who, about 1583, established themselves in Ireland. Of these, Edward, the elder, became Bishop of Down and Connor, and died without children; but the younger, Francis, became the founder of the family of Edgeworthstown. Always intensely Protestant, often intensely extravagant, each generation of the Edgeworth family afterwards had its own picturesque story, till Richard Edgeworth repaired the broken fortunes of his house, partly by success as a lawyer, partly by his marriage, in 1732, with Jane Lovell, daughter of a Welsh judge. Their eldest son, Richard Lovell Edgeworth, was born in 1744, and educated in his boyhood at Drogheda School and Dublin University. Strong, handsome, clever, ingenious, and devoted to sports of every kind, he was a general favourite. But his high spirits often led him into scrapes. The most serious of these occurred during the festivities attendant on his eldest sister's marriage with Mr. Fox of Fox Hall, at which he played at being married to a young lady who was present, by one of the guests dressed up in a white cloak, with a door-key for a ring. This foolish escapade would not deserve the faintest notice, if it had not been seriously treated as an actual marriage by a writer in the Quarterly Review.

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth

Maria Edgeworth Augustus John Cuthbert Hare. SUMMARY OF VOLUME II 339 Return to Ireland - Reading and letters : Mrs. Hemans , Blanco White , Dr. Holland , Walter Scott -- Death of Anna Edge- worth - Death of Mrs. Barbauld - Visit of Sir ...

The Life and Letters of Maria Edgeworth


Works of Maria Edgeworth Practical education 1825

Maria Edgeworth. attempted immediately to apply to practice such of their ideas as we have thought useful ; but whilst we have used the thoughts of others , we have been anxious to avoid mean plagiarism , and wherever we have borrowed ...

Works of Maria Edgeworth  Practical education  1825


Works of Maria Edgeworth Harrington Ormond 1825

Maria Edgeworth. The second tale , Ormond , is the story of a young gentle- man , who is , in some respects , the reverse of Vivian . The moral of this tale does not immediately appear , for the au- thor has taken particular care that ...

Works of Maria Edgeworth  Harrington  Ormond  1825


Works of Maria Edgeworth Early lessons 1825

Maria Edgeworth. Loud squalls of children interrupted Rosamond . The girl quickly turning to open the back door , a tribe of crying chil- dren rushed in , stretching out their dirty hands , and scream- ing , " Mary ! Mary !

Works of Maria Edgeworth  Early lessons  1825


The Absentee an Interpretation an Analysis of Maria Edgeworth s Novel

Maria Edgeworth was born in 1767 in Oxfordshire.1 Her father was an absentee landlord.2 Her mother died when she was six, so she grew up with her father and several stepmothers. At the age of fifteen, Maria Edgeworth settled in Ireland, ...

 The Absentee   an Interpretation   an Analysis of Maria Edgeworth s Novel

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 1,3, University of Paderborn, 5 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: The following term paper deals with Maria Edgeworth's novel The Absentee. Written in 1812, it is the author's third book about Irish life. As all three novels it refers to her own life, this paper begins with a short biography, which reveals this connection. The next section of the paper is about Ireland in the nineteenth century, the setting of The Absentee, which clarifies the historical background. In the following section the novel is summarized briefly. After that, the classification of the novel, gives the reasons, why it is considered a regional novel. One aspect of Irish regional novels is treated in more detail in the chapter that follows: the language of The Absentee. After these chapters, which analyze the novel, it is interpreted. Three different approaches of interpretation are used; the novel as a love story, the novel as a regional novel and the educational aspects in it.

The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part I Vol 4

Lady Mary Vivian arrived almost as soon as the newspaper that brought this intelligence: with her came a new set of thoughts, all centering in the notion of her son's consequence in the ... 242 [227/9] WORKS OF MARIA EDGEWORTH: VOLUME 4.

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part I Vol 4

This book presents a selection of the educational and occasional writings of Maria Edgeworth. It shows how Maria Edgeworth familiarised herself with the remarkably acute, closely-observed treatises and essays of the true Renaissance man, Francis Bacon. MARIA EDGEWORTH was born in 1768. Her first novel, Castle Rackrent (1800) was also her first Irish tale. The next such tale was Ennui (1809), after which came The Absentee, which began life as an unstaged play and was then published (in prose) in Tales of Fashionable Life (1812), as were several of her other stories. They were followed in 1817 by the last of her Irish tales, Ormond. Maria Edgeworth died in 1849. Edited with an introduction and notes by Marilyn Butler.

Works of Maria Edgeworth Tales of fashionable life 1826 v 7 Patronage 1825

Maria Edgeworth. Mrs. Sidney had been in the habit of living a great deal in what is called the world , and in the best company ; and though , since his death , she had lived in retirement , Miss Sidney had received an education , which ...

Works of Maria Edgeworth  Tales of fashionable life  1826    v  7  Patronage  1825


The Works of Maria Edgeworth Part I Vol 7

'Lady Mary Pembroke, my niece,' - said Mrs Hungerford - Her ladyship was followed by Mr Barclay — Count Altenberg seemed in a fair way to have all his doubts satisfied. - But, in the hurry of his mind, he had almost forgot to ask for ...

The Works of Maria Edgeworth  Part I Vol 7

This book explores British society and discriminates between its people and their lifestyles, investigates English politics, and addresses the objections of the medical and legal professions. MARIA EDGEWORTH was born in 1768. Her first novel, Castle Rackrent (1800) was also her first Irish tale. The next such tale was Ennui (1809), after which came The Absentee, which began life as an unstaged play and was then published (in prose) in Tales of Fashionable Life (1812), as were several of her other stories. They were followed in 1817 by the last of her Irish tales, Ormond. Maria Edgeworth died in 1849. Edited with an introduction and notes by Marilyn Butl

Maria Edgeworth

Miss Edgeworth has her own shrewd comments to make upon it all , and describes with much amusement- " the ... Noteworthy enough , yet to the student of Irish social life there are facts to be remembered about Mary Martin which are even ...

Maria Edgeworth