Mark Twain as a Literary Artist

Seeming to agree with Mr. Brooks's comment that Mark Twain's interest was confined to the “purely or mainly verbal ... Mark Twain was, at first, an attempt to determine whether he was a “conscious” or an “unconscious” literary artist.

Mark Twain as a Literary Artist

Mark Twain has been the subject of violent disagreement among critics. Most of them have believed that he was an “unconscious artist,” working by impulse. Mark Twain as a Literary Artist shows that Mark Twain was much more the conscious craftsman than is generally believed. Here is revealed Twain’s violent mental conflict, a logical dilemma, which forced much of his work into distorted patterns of thought and structure. Through years of practice he evolved methods to achieve detachment through techniques such as speaking through the lips of Huckleberry Finn or some other childlike person; placing satiric scenes far off in time or space; diminishing the human race to microscopic proportions so that its wrongs could be treated with detachment; and reducing life to a dream in which the greatest wrongs become tolerable because they seem unreal. Mark Twain as a Literary Artist is a mature, thorough, and revealing reassessment of the mind and methods of one of the most controversial figures in American literature.

Mark Twain as a Literary Artist

Here is revealed Twain’s violent mental conflict, a logical dilemma, which forced much of his work into distorted patterns of thought and structure.

Mark Twain as a Literary Artist

Mark Twain has been the subject of violent disagreement among critics. Most of them have believed that he was an “unconscious artist,” working by impulse. Mark Twain as a Literary Artist shows that Mark Twain was much more the conscious craftsman than is generally believed. Here is revealed Twain’s violent mental conflict, a logical dilemma, which forced much of his work into distorted patterns of thought and structure. Through years of practice he evolved methods to achieve detachment through techniques such as speaking through the lips of Huckleberry Finn or some other childlike person; placing satiric scenes far off in time or space; diminishing the human race to microscopic proportions so that its wrongs could be treated with detachment; and reducing life to a dream in which the greatest wrongs become tolerable because they seem unreal. Mark Twain as a Literary Artist is a mature, thorough, and revealing reassessment of the mind and methods of one of the most controversial figures in American literature.

On Mark Twain

The Sober Affirmation of Mark Twain's Hadleyburg Clinton S. Burhans , Jr. 10 SAY THAT Twain's finest and most significant works would probably ... 3 Gladys Bellamy , Mark Twain at a Literary Artist ( Norman , Oklahoma , 1950 ) , pp .

On Mark Twain

“This volume on Twain is among the first in a series of critical appraisals of American authors, 'The Best from American Literature,' which reprints articles from the pages of that prestigious journal. . . . This amounts to a fascinating portrait of Samuel Clemens as author/performer/reformer/husband-man and public figure, thereby profiling the evolution of literary opinion and arbitration of an emerging canon. “Overall, this valuable entry in the process of recollecting our past scholarship amounts to a most useful overview of American literary study. More important, the Twain selections represent an acutely balanced chronology of a complex talent. This volume and those following should be invaluable additions to academic collections.”—Choice

The Art Humor and Humanity of Mark Twain

"Doctoral Dissertations in American Literature,” American Literature, Vol. IV (January, 1933 ). 438Information about first appearances and first editions of Mark Twain's writings is provided in the following: Johnson, ...

The Art  Humor  and Humanity of Mark Twain

Mark Twain is revealed here in an entirely new autobiographical light from his own writings as they reflect his career, his thinking, and his humor. This volume captures the grandeur that distinguishes Mark Twain as, in the words of George Bernard Shaw, “by far the greatest American writer.” Made up of short stories and excerpts from Twain’s principal works, this collection demonstrates Twain’s artistry in handling anecdotes, tales, description, and characterization; the fervency of his ethical convictions; his effective use of irony, satire, burlesque, and caricature; and his essential humanity. By arranging the materials in chronological order and weaving them together with critical commentary, the editors present the many facets of Mark Twain’s experience and his dynamic personality with greater continuity than in previous collections of Twain’s writings. Here is the optimism of the young Mark Twain responding to the rough and rugged vitality of the mid-nineteenth-century American scene, and the skepticism and pessimism of the older Mark Twain reacting to the American democratic experiment of the late nineteenth century.

Routledge Revivals Mark Twain as a Literary Comedian 1979

Bellamy, Gladys C. Mark Twain as a Literary Artist. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1950. ———. “Mark Twain's Indebtedness to John Phoenix,” American Literature, XIII (March, 1941), 29–43. Benson, Ivan. Mark Twain's Western Years.

Routledge Revivals  Mark Twain as a Literary Comedian  1979

Originally published in 1979, Mark Twain as a Literary Comedian looks at how Mark Twain addressed social issues through humour. The Southwest provided the subject for much of Twain’s writing, but the roots of his style lay principally in north-eastern humour. In the mid-1800s the northern United States underwent social changes that reflected in the writing of the literary humourists like Twain. Sloane argues that he used humour to describe conditions in the emerging middle-class urban experience and express his American vision and that Twain’s views on the human, social, and political conditions, presented through his fictional characters, elevated the use of literary humour in the American novel.

Reader s Guide to Literature in English

A.O.J. COCKSHUT Twain , Mark 1835-1910 American novelist , essayist , and short - story writer Bellamy , Gladys , Mark Twain as a Literary Artist , Norman : University of Oklahoma Press , 1950 Bloom , Harold ( ed . ) ...

Reader s Guide to Literature in English

First Published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Mark Twain Under Fire

When the first uniform edition of Twain's works appeared in 1899—a significant marker of an author's literary ... One of the most artistic things in the book—and that Mark Twain is a literary artist of a very high order all who have ...

Mark Twain Under Fire

Tracks the genesis and evolution of Twain's reputation as a writer, revealing how and why the writer has been "under fire" since the advent of his career.

Study Guide to The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain

The book is valuable as a starting point for study of Mark Twain. The Brooks-DeVoto debate has been summarized ... LITERARY ARTISTRY Studies of Mark Twain as a literary artist are getting more plentiful. Gladys Bellamy's Mark Twain as ...

Study Guide to The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain

A comprehensive study guide offering in-depth explanation, essay, and test prep for Mark Twain’s The Prince and the Pauper, the author’s first attempt at historical fiction. As a novel of the nineteenth-century, the story of The Prince and the Pauper continues to live on through video games, movies, TV shows, and books. Moreover, the novel presents timelessly relevant themes of justice and judgement, identity, and, society and class. This Bright Notes Study Guide explores the context and history of Mark Twain’s classic work, helping students to thoroughly explore the reasons it has stood the literary test of time. Each Bright Notes Study Guide contains: - Introductions to the Author and the Work - Character Summaries - Plot Guides - Section and Chapter Overviews - Test Essay and Study Q&As The Bright Notes Study Guide series offers an in-depth tour of more than 275 classic works of literature, exploring characters, critical commentary, historical background, plots, and themes. This set of study guides encourages readers to dig deeper in their understanding by including essay questions and answers as well as topics for further research.

Mark Twain American Humorist

For instance, Gladys Carmen Bellamy argued in Mark Twain as a Literary Artist (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press: 1950) that Mark Twain's humor evidenced clear literary artistry, which implies that popular humor springs forth from ...

Mark Twain  American Humorist

Mark Twain, American Humorist examines the ways that Mark Twain’s reputation developed at home and abroad in the period between 1865 and 1882, years in which he went from a regional humorist to national and international fame. In the late 1860s, Mark Twain became the exemplar of a school of humor that was thought to be uniquely American. As he moved into more respectable venues in the 1870s, especially through the promotion of William Dean Howells in the Atlantic Monthly, Mark Twain muddied the hierarchical distinctions between class-appropriate leisure and burgeoning forms of mass entertainment, between uplifting humor and debased laughter, and between the literature of high culture and the passing whim of the merely popular.

The Literary Reputation of Mark Twain from 1910 to 1950

1 " Alden in the Bookman, though enthusiastic over Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, denied Mark Twain the title of artist : " The art which premeditatively determines the scope of its venture so that one sees at every step the curvature ...

The Literary Reputation of Mark Twain from 1910 to 1950


Mark Twain as Critic

By far the most satisfying exhibition of the comic artist at work is Walter Blair's Mark Twain & Huck Finn (Berkeley, Calif., 1960). Explication of his theories of composition and literary art may be found in several articles: George W.

Mark Twain as Critic

The evidence presented in this book challenges the view that Twain was not a serious student of the craft of writing; he possessed the combination of sensitivity and judgment that all great critics have.

Study Guide to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

Wagenknecht's third edition includes a “Commentary on Mark Twain Criticism and Scholarship since 1960” as well as a bibliography. ... LITERARY ARTISTRY Studies of Mark Twain as a literary artist are getting more plentiful.

Study Guide to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

A comprehensive study guide offering in-depth explanation, essay, and test prep for Mark Twain's The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the best-selling of Twain’s work. As a novel written in 1876, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer follows the antics of a young boy during his childhood on the Mississippi River. Moreover, Twain examines the carefree spirit of children, manipulation, and race in this lighthearted novel through the use of imagery and symbolism. This Bright Notes Study Guide explores the context and history of Twain’s classic work, helping students to thoroughly explore the reasons it has stood the literary test of time. Each Bright Notes Study Guide contains: - Introductions to the Author and the Work - Character Summaries - Plot Guides - Section and Chapter Overviews - Test Essay and Study Q&As The Bright Notes Study Guide series offers an in-depth tour of more than 275 classic works of literature, exploring characters, critical commentary, historical background, plots, and themes. This set of study guides encourages readers to dig deeper in their understanding by including essay questions and answers as well as topics for further research.

The Life of Mark Twain

Wonham, Mark Twain and the Art of the Tall Tale, 110; W. D. Howells, “Recent Literature,” Atlantic Monthly 29 (June 1872): 754–55; MTHL, 10–11; Roughing It, iv, 376. 12. SLC's famous essay “Fenimore Cooper's Literary Offenses” (1895) ...

The Life of Mark Twain

The second volume of Gary Scharnhorst’s three-volume biography chronicles the life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens between his move with his family from Buffalo to Elmira (and then Hartford) in spring 1871 and their departure from Hartford for Europe in mid-1891. During this time he wrote and published some of his best-known works, including Roughing It, The Gilded Age, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, A Tramp Abroad, The Prince and the Pauper, Life on the Mississippi,Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. Significant events include his trips to England (1872–73) and Bermuda (1877); the controversy over his Whittier Birthday Speech in December 1877; his 1878–79 Wanderjahr on the continent; his 1882 tour of the Mississippi valley; his 1884–85 reading tour with George Washington Cable; his relationships with his publishers (Elisha Bliss, James R. Osgood, Andrew Chatto, and Charles L. Webster); the death of his son, Langdon, and the births and childhoods of his daughters Susy, Clara, and Jean; as well as the several lawsuits and personal feuds in which he was involved. During these years, too, Clemens expressed his views on racial and gender equality and turned to political mugwumpery; supported the presidential campaigns of Grover Cleveland; advocated for labor rights, international copyright, and revolution in Russia; founded his own publishing firm; and befriended former president Ulysses S. Grant, supervising the publication of Grant’s Memoirs. The Life of Mark Twain is the first multi-volume biography of Samuel Clemens to appear in more than a century and has already been hailed as the definitive Twain biography.

The New Mark Twain Handbook

The Literary Apprenticeship of Mark Twain concludes with a chapter on the fulfillment of the artist in Huckleberry Finn. 14. DeVoto called Grattan's essay on Mark Twain “the finest treatment of him in print” (Mark Twain's America, 218).

The New Mark Twain Handbook

This authors of this useful handbook, originally published in 1985, not only summarise Mark Twain scholarship, but also evaluate, in much detail, the various contributions. Each chapter includes a thorough annotated bibliography. This title also includes a comprehensive chronological table of the significant events in Mark Twain’s Life, including the publication dates of his works. This title will be of interest to students of American Literature.

Mark Twain s Ethical Realism

Gladys Bellamy , Mark Twain as a Literary Artist , 155. Harold Kolb , The Illusion of Life : American Realism as a Literary Form , 48. Donald Pizer , Realism and Naturalism in Nineteenth - Century American Literature , 4 , 7 . 2.

Mark Twain s Ethical Realism

Mark Twain's Ethical Realism is the only work that looks specifically at how Twain blends ethical and aesthetic concerns in the act of composing his novels. Fulton conducts a spirited discussion regarding these concepts, and his explanation of how they relate to Twain's writing helps to clarify the complexities of his creative genius.

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain

Mark Twain as a Literary Artist. Norman: U of Oklahoma P. 1950. Branch, Edgar Marquess. The Literary Apprentiteship of Mark Twain. Urbana: U of Illinois P, 1950. . "'My Voice Is Still for Setchell': A Background Study of 'Jim Smiley and ...

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain

"A model reference work that can be used with profit and delight by general readers as well as by more advanced students of Twain. Highly recommended." - Library Journal The Routledge Encyclopedia of Mark Twain includes more than 700 alphabetically arranged entries that cover a full variety of topics on this major American writer's life, intellectual milieu, literary career, and achievements. Because so much of Twain's travel narratives, essays, letters, sketches, autobiography, journalism and fiction reflect his personal experience, particular attention is given to the delicate relationship between art and life, between artistic interpretations and their factual source. This comprehensive resource includes information on: Twain’s life and times: the author's childhood in Missouri and apprenticeship as a riverboat pilot, early career as a journalist in the West, world travels, friendships with well-known figures, reading and education, family life and career Complete Works: including novels, travel narratives, short stories, sketches, burlesques, and essays Significant characters, places, and landmarks Recurring concerns, themes or concepts: such as humor, language; race, war, religion, politics, imperialism, art and science Twain’s sources and influences. Useful for students, researchers, librarians and teachers, this volume features a chronology, a special appendix section tracking the poet's genealogy, and a thorough index. Each entry also includes a bibliography for further study.

The Mark Twain Encyclopedia

... 69 Blindman's World and Other Stories , The , 69 ; Dr. Heidenhoff's Process , 69 ; Equality , 69 ; Looking Backward , 69 ; Mrs. Ludington's Sister , 69 Bellamy , Gladys Carmen , 39 , 386 Mark Twain as a Literary Artist , 660 Bellay ...

The Mark Twain Encyclopedia

A reference guide to the great American author (1835-1910) for students and general readers. The approximately 740 entries, arranged alphabetically, are essentially a collection of articles, ranging significantly in length and covering a variety of topics pertaining to Twain's life, intellectual milieu, literary career, and achievements. Because so much of Twain's writing reflects Samuel Clemens's personal experience, particular attention is given to the interface between art and life, i.e., between imaginative reconstructions and their factual sources of inspiration. Each entry is accompanied by a selective bibliography to guide readers to sources of additional information. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Centenary Reflections on Mark Twain s No 44 the Mysterious Stranger

in Mark Twain as a Literary Artist. norman: university of oklahoma Press, 1950. berkove, lawrence i. “Mark twain's Mind and the illusion of freedom.” special issue, Journal for the Study of the Humanities: Language & Culture ...

Centenary Reflections on Mark Twain s No  44  the Mysterious Stranger

In this first book on No. 44 in thirty years, thirteen especially commissioned essays by some of today's most accomplished Twain scholars cover an array of topics, from domesticity and transnationalism to race and religion, and reflect a variety of scholarly and theoretical approaches to the work. This far-reaching collection considers the status of No. 44 within Twain's oeuvre as they offer cogent insights into such broad topics as cross-culturalism, pain and redemption, philosophical paradox, and comparative studies of the "Mysterious Stranger" manuscripts. All of these essays attest to the importance of this late work in Twain's canon, whether considering how Twain's efforts at truth-telling are premeditated and shaped by his own experiences, tracing the biblical and religious influences that resonate in No. 44, or exploring the text's psychological dimensions. Several address its importance as a culminating work in which Twain's seemingly disjointed story lines coalesce in meaningful, albeit not always satisfactory, ways. An afterword by Alan Gribben traces the critical history of the "Mysterious Stranger" manuscripts and the contributions of previous critics. A wide-ranging critical introduction and a comprehensive bibliography on the last century of scholarship bracket the contributions. Close inspection of this multidimensional novel shows how Twain evolved as a self-conscious thinker and humorist--and that he was a more conscious artist throughout his career than has been previously thought. Centenary Reflections deepens our understanding of one of Twain's most misunderstood texts, confirming that the author of No. 44 was a pursuer of an elusive truth that was often as mysterious a stranger as Twain himself.

Mark Twain Unsanctified Newspaper Reporter

Scholars have neglected this initial period since two extended analyses were published in 1950: Gladys Bellamy's Mark Twain as a Literary Artist and Edgar Branch's Mark Twain's Literary Apprenticeship. Even the unpublished manuscripts ...

Mark Twain  Unsanctified Newspaper Reporter

Before Mark Twain became a national celebrity with his best-selling The Innocents Abroad, he was just another struggling writer perfecting his craft-but already "playin' hell" with the world. In the first book in more than fifty years to examine the initial phase of Samuel Clemens's writing career, James Caron draws on contemporary scholarship and his own careful readings to offer a fresh and comprehensive perspective on those early years-and to challenge many long-standing views of Mark Twain's place in the tradition of American humor. Tracing the arc of Clemens's career from self-described "unsanctified newspaper reporter" to national author between 1862 and 1867, Caron reexamines the early and largely neglected writings-especially the travel letters from Hawaii and the letters chronicling Clemens's trip from California to New York City. Caron connects those sets of letters with comic materials Clemens had already published, drawing on all known items from this first phase of his career-even the virtually forgotten pieces from the San Francisco Morning Call in 1864-to reveal how Mark Twain's humor was shaped by the sociocultural context and how it catered to his audience's sensibilities while unpredictably transgressing its standards. Caron reveals how Sam Clemens's contemporaries, notably Charles Webb, provided important comic models, and he shows how Clemens not only adjusted to but also challenged the guidelines of the newspapers and magazines for which he wrote, evolving as a comic writer who transmuted personal circumstances into literary art. Plumbing Mark Twain's cultural significance, Caron draws on anthropological insights from Victor Turner and others to compare the performative aspects of Clemens's early work to the role of ritual clowns in traditional societies Brimming with fresh insights into such benchmarks as "Our Fellow Savages of the Sandwich Islands" and "Jim Smiley and His Jumping Frog," this book is a gracefully written work that reflects both patient research and considered judgment to chart the development of an iconic American talent. Mark Twain, Unsanctified Newspaper Reporter should be required reading for all serious scholars of his work, as well as for anyone interested in the interplay between artistic creativity and the literary marketplace.